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THE ASCOT MEETING

DERBY RUNNERS SUCCEED

FIVE WIN THIS YEAR

(From "The Post's" Representative.)

LONDON, 17th Juno.

Last j'ear an interesting feature of the Royal Ascot Meeting was < the fact that nine horses that had run prominently in the Derby at Epsom; a fortnight before, carried off valuable prizes at the following "Aristocratic" meeting. Students of turf history, therefore, were interested this year to find out how many of the Epsom contestants would recover backers' losses next time out. Several were gratil'yingly successful, but others gave most disappointing displays. Successful were Dastur, who was beaten at Epsom by April the Fifth, Portofino, eighth iv the Derby, in which he led till round Tattenham Corner, Totaig, sixteenth at Epsom, Andrea, seventeenth, and Cockpen, the "dark horse" of the Derby, whose lack of form then puzzled the stable and was regarded to be too bad to be true. .

Among, the continued disappointments was Miracle, the Derby third, who failed at Ascot in the Prince of Wales's Stakes (one mile, five furlongs), being beaten by Sigiri, a colt by Bruleur—Sam Ya. Miracle had every chance, for he led into the straight and was still leading a furlong from the post. There are some who think he is still physically a baby, or else that he possesses an unpleasant temperament. The fact remains that, his patrons- suffered another rebuff and they were sorely disappointed. Hesperus, too, Derby twelfth, started' favourite for the St. James's Palace Stakes, but he could come in no better than fourth, after giving an inglorious and spineless display. His second defeat is reminding people of the "Wreck of the Hesperus." One commentator observes: "He came home to port quite a long time after Andrea had berthed, following his successful voyage in the St. James's Palace. Stakes. It becomes even more difficult to realise how Basil Jarvis couldV have been deceived into thinking Hesperus was a: potential Derby winner." THE SUCCESSES. In the St. James's Palace . Stakes, of £5300, for three-year-olds, one mile, there were no; fewer than three of the Derby contestantsr-Andfea, Wyvern, Vand Hesperus, also Spenser, who had- been paid up at Epsom but was scratched. The winner was the Duke of Maryborough's Andrea. (Solario—Persuasion), with Sir L. Phillip's Wyvern (Coronach—Salamandra) a length away' second, and Mr. S. Tattersajl's Spenser (Hurstwood—Bridal Dawn) third.' Congratulating the Duke on the good fortune that has attended his colt, "The Sporting Life" remarks:—"lt is given to few owners^to win a race at the. Royal Meeting with their first runner. Andrea, r>f courie.'ig the colt that Jack Jayvis passed on to the Duke afta- he had bought the three-year-old out of the Manton stable at the sale of. the late Sir John Rutherford's horses^ Andrea 'blooded' the colour's of 'the Duke by winning the Royal Standard Stakes at Manchester, and was regarded as having an outside chance in the Derby." v .'The turn of the Aga Khan's Dastur to be first past the post came on the.second day. when he won the King Edward VII. Stakes of 2QOO eovs. for three-year-olds, run over the Swinley Course (mile and a half). 7 There were only five runners. He made his effort about a quarter of a mile from home, and'quickly drawing away won in a canter by a length. Beary rode, and P. Butters is the trainer. Dastur's victory was well deserved, for ho had been second in the Free Handicap, the Two Thousand Guineas, and the Derby. B. ROSEN'S TRIUMPH. On this day, too, Mr. V. Emmanuel's Totaig (Dawsori City—Miss Cariin, by Liniond) proved the surprise winner of the Royal Hunt Cup in a large field of thirty-one. He was skilfully ridden by n jockey unknown here, B. Kosen, the Australian lightweight, who has been riding in France, and who can go to scale at &sl 12lb. Rosen was in Bombay last winter, and a few months ago arrived in France. Getting a chance ride he won his race, and one French owner was so impressed that be at once gave him an engagement to ride for the stable. George Duller taig's* trainer) had'^heard of his abjlity, and. Bait |to Franc* for him.' He was immediately appreciated here as a 'sound horseman. The Royal Hunt Cup, £2500 additional, ig an' event of seven furlongs 155 yards, and Totaig is the first three-year-old to win the Cupduring the past eighteen years. In 1914 the winner was Lie-a-Bed. Mr. Emmanuel is an American who has patronised flat racing and steeplechasing extensively,in this country. Totaig was bred by Sir Keith Fraser, who still has some interest in him. Abbots Worthy started favourite. Totaig carried 7st 31b. He beat Kyes Frond (Grand Parade—Ciliata) syrs, 7st 61b, by two lengths, with Mr. G. Lambton's Pricket (Twelve Pointer-Pieardel), 4yrs, Bst 51b, third, and the favourite fourth. Pricket was badly drawn. Dawson City, it may be recalled, was a handsome son of Spearmint, and is now in the Transvaal. Miss Carlin, dam of Totaig, is a daughter of Limond, who, as the result of the great promise of Limosin, was sold as A stallion to New Zealand. Miss Carlin never raced. Iler previous produce are Tully Wood, winner of six races, Aspiration, a speedy two-year-old in .1929, and Glasbheinn, who won a couple of races last year and has also scored this ■year. The next Derby runner that day to retrieve his fair name—lie was always referred to as the "gentleman" of the Epsom .party—was Lord Woolavington's Cockpen (Buchan.—Margeritta), who took the five furlong Fern Hill Stakes, but only by a short head, from Mr, Macomber's colt. Clustine (Captain Cuttlo—La Mauri), with Mr. T. Richards' Miss Megance (Golden Boss—Anno of Brittany) a neck away third. Cockpen and Clustine both have brilliant speed, and the contest was an exciting one to watch. The turn of the Middleham-trained horse, Portofino, who had led for one mile and a quarter in the Epsom Classic, came on the third' afternoon at Ascot, when he gained a tremendously popular Victory in the Waterford Stakes, one mile. The trainer, D. M. Peacock, is the!doyen of the North,' and ia very popular with all racegoers. His horses are nsuajly ridden hy W. Nevett, also a popular little man. Turf enthusiasts give a great welcome to men who bring Northern-trained horses to compete with the cracks of the South. Portofino is by Sansovino from Fifine, and is owned by Mr. J. G. Thompson.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19320722.2.17.11

Bibliographic details

THE ASCOT MEETING, Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 19, 22 July 1932

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1,064

THE ASCOT MEETING Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 19, 22 July 1932

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