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SLOW WORK

HEAVYWEIGHT WRESTLING

KOOLMAN BRILLIANT

Making his first appearance in a wrestling ring for six years, Ike Robin, the well-known Maori wrestler, who elnims the heavyweight championship of Australasia, attempted to "come ' back" in the Town Hall last night. He was a little too ambitious. Against Peter Limutkin he did not show anything which would give hope of his performing creditably against a visiting wrestler approaching his own weight. Robin certainly won, hut that was all, and the match can best be written down as just, another eifort on the part of the Wrestling Union to give a local man a chance to prove his worth. If the "big" match of the night was a failure, a preliminary professional contest between Anton Koolman, of Wellington, and Len Naylor, of Auckland, was not. To use au Americanism, this pair "stole the show." They turned in as bright and as spectacular a bout as has been seen in Wellington for a long time, and during the three rounds they were in the ring they bad the audience cheering continually. Koolman produced some of the cleverest wrestling that has yet been seen in the local ring. Against an opponent who played right up to him, he amazed the fair-sized audience with his agility and versatility, winding up a brilliant display by incapacitating his man. Although shaded by Koolman, Naylor also gave a fine exhibition of speedy, skilful wrestling, and Wellington enthusiasts will want to see more of him. THE BIG MEN. Ttobin, who was carrying plenty of condition, weighed 17st 121b, to Limutkin's Hst 31b, and very early it was apparent that the latter did not want to get to close quarters with the big Maori. For long periods they played for openings in the referee's hold, while the audience invited them to do something. Once Robin managed to secure a headlock, but Limutkin slipped out, and when in one of their few visits to the mat they rolled under the ropes the referee (Anton Koolman) made them go back to the centre and Limutkin kneel on the floor. While on top of his man Robin nearly turned him Over with an arm. roll, but he had to give lip at the gong. Ponderously the pair moved around the ring and the audience became more and more caustic about their futile efforts. As an exhibition of grunting, groaning, tugging, and shoving the match reached a high level; as a display of wrestling it did not. At length in the third round Robin managed to roll Limutkin over and resting his 17st 121b on him obtained a fall. It was the only one, for the fourth round had just started when Limutkin Came up from under the ropes where he had bean shoved by Robin, complaining that his thumb had been put out of joint. Koolman urged him into it, but Limutkin did not relish the idea, and the bout was awarded to Robin. DASHING MIDDLEWEIGHTS. In preliminary contrast to the heavyAnton Kdolman (list)'and Leu Naylor (list 81b)-.started.og- with a great rattle. At the gbng Naylor rushed across i the ring, but Koolman; dodged, and immediately had the crowd cheering when he lifted Naylor clean ,in /the air 'with a headlock. Thereafter; they-dived and tumbled -around, the ring: in - the ■• liveliest possible fashion. Flying tackles and "dumps'' were frequently • brought into ;play, and each,man made attempts to put the other over the. ropes. The wrestling was really high class, and the crowd throughout, the round was hi a high state of excitement. Just befbre the gong went the referee wab hooted for breaking the men when.they were in an interesting position, .and he made matters worse .for himself. by trying to explain his action... .The. .crowd let themselves go vocally.' ..... •■-./ ~•..;■■';. ■ ■, ; ,

"Submit,".. cried i Koolman ' early in thfi second. round, .as. he. worked at an arm !rck, but Naylor. stuck to. it,- arid; working clear, he gave Koolman a ■ .painful few mimrtesxteff was 6n all the -way,., Ko6lman?s ■■ ■variety of holds and:the- adroit way- in which he applied them repeatedly; calling fbrthMoud applause. Naylor was never,:far..behind, and the audience, was highly delighted with the spectacular work. ' ' Naylor opened the third round with another rush,' but .Koolman ■ was' quickly on top of him. Grasping Naylor-in"a body hold he stood up, bringing his '.opponent over his head, and thenielkon his back. Naylor coming over too, to land head first on the floor. ..The-throwvknown as the back suplex throw was wonderfully effective, • for it knocked :.Naylor: unconscious and Koolman .easily, piniied him. The Aucklander , gamely attempted to come out for the fourth round, but'he fell headlong to the floor, and for some unknown- reason the referee commenced to count him out. After reaching fifteen, howeverj. he changed his mind and gave the, match to Koolman. Both men were deservedly applauded' when they left the ring. Naylor, who had a slight touch of: concussion, recovered later. AMATEUR BOUTS. . L. .Drew (Bst 91b) and 'K. Groves (?st 71b) showed some nice wrestling for two rounds,'and then the former started, in earnest in the thij-d to get the only fall with a body scissors and arm roll. After three streauous rounds in which neither man could obtain a definite advantage the referee declared the match between R. Allan (list 4lb) and-H. R. Godfrey (list 101b) a draw.

Mr. F. Rawlinson refereed the amateur bouts and the Koohnan-Naylor contest.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19320719.2.158

Bibliographic details

SLOW WORK, Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 16, 19 July 1932

Word Count
898

SLOW WORK Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 16, 19 July 1932

Working