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DAZED BY SUCCESS

APRIL THE FIFTH'S OWNER

TVE LIVED FOR THIS"

(From "The Post's" Representative.) LONDON, 2nd June. In the long history of the Derby Stakes perhaps no man was ever more dazed with the success of his representative than was Mr. Tom Walls, as April the Fifth flashed up a furlong from the finish and settled the result in a few brief but crowded seconds. For a moment he was speechless, then the words came. "By gad!" he exclaimed. "I've lived for this." He was rushing down the stairs before the exclamation had been completed. To a "Daily Hail" representative immediately after-the race he said: "I cannot believe it is true. But did I not tell you at the London Press Club Derby luncheon on Monday that I do not joke about my horses? I told them that I thought my horse could finish second to Orwell. Orwell was not there at the finish, and my horse won." He was the centre of a great scene of enthusiasm. One of the most popular personalities in the racing world, everybody seemed to be delighted that he should have gained this wonderful triumph. Ab he was in the midst of the congratulations of his ■ friends, Brigadier H. A. Tomkinson came to him and said that the King and Queen desired to extend their personal congratulations to the trainer and part-owner of the winner. "Mr. Walls did not forget his jockey, tT,ed Lane. "Wasn't my horse wonderfully ridden?" he said. .. Tom Walls has been successful both as a ■ racehorse trainer and amateur rider, and the first big race he won was. the Liverpool Cup with Autocrat in 1927. He met with a'very'serious hunting accident last year, and recently stated ■ that he would not now be training at all had it not been for the ambitions he held regarding April the Fifth. He gave up training all horses not his own property. April the Fifth was so named because he was foaled on that?day, t and because it was also the birthday of one of his breeders, . Mr. S. McGregor. Tom Walls gave 200 guineas for, him a£ the Newmarket July sales. "Aprilthe Fifth's fitness to-day to win the Derby is perhaps due to my. illness last year," the owner remarked. "Before I was taken ill I intended to train him hard, but I gave instructions when I was laid up that he should "be treated gently: As regards the race, I was excited at-the start, but when I saw Lane well among the leading horses I knew April the Fifth would get there." . Mr. Ralph Lynn, responding to repeated calls of "Speech!" at the fall of the curtain at the Aldwyek Theatre in the eveiiing, after tlio performance of "Dirty Work," said:—"l; wish Mr. Walla could have been with us to-night, but if fiwere in his position I would-not be here either. If you want a good tip, back April the Fifth for the Leger." Calls of "Good old Tom!" and cheers greeted the remarks. . . ; . ..'.-". ,-- .. : SOME OF THE RIDERS. _ F. Lane, the rider of the winner, is a jockey of long experience, but this was his first classic victory. A mueh-ro-spected and fit man of ripe experience, he is a so., of Tom Lane, the most famous jockey in France of his period. After the race Beary,:the rider- of Dastur, said: "I had a marvellous run all through. - I was about-fifteenth up the hill, but I got a ■Wonderfill run from there, and was about sixth at Tattenham Corner. Po'rtofino was leading Firdaussi there.- Then Firdaussi took it up. A furlong and a half in t the straight 1 went to the front, and my.-horse just failed to resist April the F"th." •■;■'■- "ln the early part of the race," paid' Lane, "I was about eighth* ana three fur- i longs from home I .was sixth, with Dastur and Miracle in front of me. When- I challenged X knew it would be all right, as my horse 9taya co well." Harry Wragg, on Miracle, thought hewas second. "I would have beaten. April the Fifth, too, in a true-run race, and we shall see that in the St. Leger," he emphasised. Lane will disagree with Wragg, for he claims that it was stamina, as well as that unexpected burst of speed, which clinched matters. It was all so sudden that most people hardly realised that he had become a factor until' he was there. The sensation of the race was the astounding defeat of the favourite, Orwell, who was beaten a long way from the winning post. „ Jones said: "I was naturally disappointed, but there is no excuse to make for Orwell. . He had every chance, being given a particularly clear-run from the time that I asked him to go. out.to win the race, but I found him fading out beneath me two furlongs-from the finish.!' "I do not believe for a moment that Or 11 was got at in■• any way," said Mr. Lawsqn, his trainer. "In \my opinion, heis just/another case of a. horse not being suited to the Epsom course/ . . MR. WALLS'S CAREER. Tom Walls, racehorse trainer, actormanager,, jockey, master of hounds, racehorse owner, country, gentleman,, and, in his early days, a policeman and an enginedriver, was bred and born in the Pytchley country, and has declared himself to bo the only actor in the country who is also a "pukka" horseman. In addition to owning and riding his own horses, he has trained . them at Newmarket \ and at Epsom. Tom. Walls 'rode in his first race when he was only nine, at Ashby St. Ledgers. Then later he rode at "flapping"—galloway races—which are un- 4 registered meetings at which there are no rules of racing. '; ;■;. *. V "''.■" .■.; ' Although Tom goes to races, he very seldom bets. As he once ruefully remarked, "I have lost a lot of money, and have learned my lesson; betting is a 'mug's' game." He makes only about halt a dozen bets a year. ' He admits that he has had a lot of luck in racing, and declared that he had often won races with horses that had been almost given to him as "no good." , When Tom Walls was just a £7 a week actor uuder the late George Edwardes he would be'absent from rehearsals and late for shows—because he had gone to the races (says "The Evening News"). He was sacked several times, and he resigned several times;—just because he was racing mad. But George Edwardes—a racing man himself—took him back every time. Then came: the famous partnership with Ralph Lynn at the Aldwyeh Theatre, where success followed success. And Tom Walls was then able to set tip a permanent stable. of his own. His best horse until April the Fifth came -was Caballero, which a year or two ago put up an irritating series o£ seconds in big races. '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19320711.2.114.3

Bibliographic details

DAZED BY SUCCESS, Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 9, 11 July 1932

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1,145

DAZED BY SUCCESS Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 9, 11 July 1932

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