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SENSATIONAL DERBY

ORWELL FAILS TO STAY

APRIL THE FIFTH'S WIN

■ (From "The Post's" Representative.) •. LONDON, 2nd June. . Tor the second time in i'urf history an Epsom-trained horse has won the Derby Stake?,, about one mile and a ; half, run over the Epsom course. The first time . it was Sir G. Heatheote's Amato as long ago at 1838.. The second time—this year— it was Mr. Tom Walls's April the Fifth; a. brown colt by Craig an Jiran.: l'iom Sold Again,.by Call o' the Wild. : ■ April the Fifth's victory .was popular indeed iv.that Mr. Walls, the well-known actor., of 'clever, farces, is a tremendous fe-ounte with the' theatre-going public, and all the .people iri the vicinity of the course we're "on" the winner. But.it was not; a .popular win, because 'the Majority 'of people the world (over had pinned • their; faith to Mr. W. :M. ;O. - Singer's'lovely horse, Orwell, known last year as the Golden Hair colt; trained at the fashionable Manton stable presided over by. Mr. J. Lawson. The only doubt about Orwell was whether he would stay the distance of*-a. rather difficult course,; i"or ; all his longest and very important Vicr .tories had been over one mile. : To quote the "Times's" racing expert:—. ' • ' "J. must admit that there was a time ■last" season when I wondered if so fast ■;a colt as Orweir could stay a mile and 'T-ahalf. If. he'were able to stay that dis- >; •tante^then I could not help "thinking that s.;'*here /was\«p.exceptionally: good and outi;standing colt. At .Manton, where he is , trained,; there is faith iri his capacity to .stay a 'mile..and a half. Further, he is .bred; to -do. bo on his sire's side; and • 'Gainsborough has shown himself to be a sire. The only assumption .'i-js ■ that 'Orwell is an exceptionally good ? fcolt,"! the;- life of' ■whom we sec only * too <s.seldomi'*-It is. said by peoplel who should ? know iribst about him that he is the best 'Horse there, "has - been...at Manton since vßayardo f.(who, incidentally, was: beaten f ift. the Derby of 1909, the winner. being f. Bang Edward's Minoru). That Orwell .'.'Kaa Retained his form of the Two ThotK ■ saiic[;: Guineas, and indeed improved on" ■vit,;is;suggested by the fact that in theft | ,;last. gallop' Orwell finished a very long I '/■way in front of Spenser, who was fifth j -an -the Two Thousand Guineas. I really I i'do not pee»why we should consider further ithie claims of those colts in to-day's race. ."•■■■who were beaten by Orwell at jvewmar-i v.ket."' - "•■■■■ .*. *- " * ■*.■■ : ■■-..■• -'■ -

Horses that- had - already covered.'one' mile and a half included Apul the Fifth, Miracle, Royal, Dancer, and, Cockpen. Orwell had satisfied his trainer m a spin of one mile and three furlongs with the recent" winner, Creme Brulce. All the sporting writers had been busy. for weeks championing tho cause of Orwell, and seeing nothing to beat him, provided his stamina were assumed. The horse had done in training everything that his stable had asked, he had an excellent character reputation, and latest bulletins declared: "All's -well with Orwell." So why not Orwell. But, alack and alas, when the race was finishing the pitiful cry went up, "Where k Orwell.'" Hundreds of thousands of people had everything on him, but he came in a sorry ninth. / TWENTY-ONE STARTERS. There were twenty-one starters, io the field was not unwieldy. They wero Apul the Fifth, Lord Koseberj's Miracle, the Aga Khan's Dastur and Firdaus&i, Mr. X, Esmoad's Royal Dancer, Mr. It. S.> Croker*« Celebrator and Corey, Mr. J. G' Thompson's Portofino (the hope of the Korth of Kngland), Mr. Somerville Tattersall'a Spenser, Mr. P. Haldane's Buckle, il. M. Boussac's Hesperus, Sir '!>.' I'hillipps' Wyvern, Prince Aly Khau's Jackdaw the Second, Mr. ,C. C. Hall's Bacchus, Mr. V. Emmanuel's Totaig, the Duke of Marlborough's Andrea, Lord s Woolavington's Cockpen (generally ieferred to as "the* gentleman o£ the party"), Mr. W. Littauer's Jiweh (j French-bred horse), Mr. C. Gulliver's Summer Planet, and Mrs. Gulliver's Peter Planet. It seemed to be the unanimous opinion of all present at the annual Press Club Derby luncheon, held a few days previously, that Orwell was already first past the post, so it remained only for the other owners to express their hopes of attaining places. Among those present ■was Mr. Walls, who, in his racing affairs, Jikes to be taken seriously, and ■who expressed the opinion that aftct Ins horse's iiinning in the Two Thousand Guineas hf1 saw no reason why he should not, and every, reason why ho should, finish in the first three, and ho continued -to say * over and over again later thai dwell hjs the only horse that -would tiouble his own beautiful colt. In a Sunday paper 'he told countless thousands of leadeia: "Remember . . . April the Fifth is not a joke. It may come to pass that Apul "the Fitth will deserve to be leuained June the First as a tubute to his running in the Derby." A tramer who was hopehil oF beating vOrwell was F Bailing with Loid Woolavington's Cockpen. His doubt was whether Cockpen would beat Apul the Fifth. Since April the Fifth ran m the Two Thousand Guineas he had shown icmarkable improvement in form, and his owner had become so keen on his chance that he was almost inclined to rule out Orwell. It was in the Derby Trial Sweepstakes on 21st May that April the Fifth showed of what he was really made Tins race ■was over a mile and a half, so thuo was no doubt that ho could' stay the Derby distance. April the Fifth is> a son of Craig an Eran, who ran second m the Derby of 1921 after having won the Guineas. "I think my horse is the bct>t place bet in. the race," said tho owner, and I'red Lane (jockey)1 declared- "April tbo Fifth greatly pleased me liy the niannci in which he -won at Lingfield.' THE RACE DESCRIBED. The weather •was ideal, tho &un shone, going was peifect,! and the stait -was admirable. Visibility m«, howe\ei, .not too good, it being difficult to distinguish some of the colours. Cockpen was the first to show in fiont, but he soon dropped bade and g;ue way to Portofino, who made the running Onlookers could discern 'Miracle, Bacchus', «nd Andiea well placed, uhile Oiwoll was sufficiently handy to w in it he had been good enough. ■'Poitofino was still m hont going down the lull round Tattonham Corner into the "straight, into which ho -wats followed by Ijastur and Muaclc Soon atter the straight was, reached Poitofino was beaten and fell back, Icmng Dastur in front, followod by Mnacle Half-way up the stiamht Orwell dialJenged on thf outside, and loi a moment it seemed that he would diaw Away 115 Jie had done in the \,ilo foi t!ic Two thousand Guineas, anil -nonld win with oase. But no sootier, had lie taken his place than Jie wijs in trouble, and Jones took his whip to him These nab, unfortunately, no reply, and dwell w-as Tieaten because1 he' could not stay the distance. When Orwell was bealrn it seemed that the winner would be Dabtur, who w.is then leading and Iqoked as if holding Miracle. Suddenly, about a fuilong from the. unish. April the Fifth, who had alw jj b been well placed, came with a rush and in a moment the race was over, for April the Fifth sailed past Miracle and Dastur and won easily by three-<niarters of <t length. Dastur beat Miracle by a short head for second place,, and then came Roj'al Dancer fourth. Time, 2min 43 l-ssec OBWEUL'S FAILURE. "Hotspm" ("Daily Telegraph' J .-urns up the position.— 'It *all boils, ('own to this lli< brst stayer won—a hoisc, too. with a fine burst of speed. Why dwell and Hesperus shonld have been such f.ulmct, is bejond me to explain. Certainly it- elabmalc pre-

cautions to shield the iavourito from evildoers counted for anything, then Orwell was unmolested. Commonsense, indeed, tells us that. He was so firm in-..the betting.. .'Not the-slightest'weakness was indicated 'there. Not even the big sweepstakes _brought about any lengthening of his - price, as had at one . time seemed likely. . Orwell had. made an entry into the-vpaddqek- in a sheet- which' covered almost! the whole of his handsome "figure. Walkiug .on either side were half-a-dozen ijiiards, ,with a mounted policeman' heading the procession. Mr. Gerald Deane, of tlie Maiiton stable, and the trainer, Joe Lawson", were in close attendance.. This■unusual- procession, the need . for which cannot be doubted, in face of the rumours and thrpats of attack, only broke up for the-time; being,as the\ horse, ali-eady saddled at Mrs. Tom Sherwood's, place across1, the Downs, was taken " into the parade-ring: Even' there he was walked well away fro)n the ripgside. In tlie parade' on the course there was a guard on either sider of him. : Orwell was not 'nobbled.' ■ •

. "A-word or two more about April the ■Fifthl H- is a grand and encouraging thing-that the greatest of all prizes should have gone to .a man. so •\yorthy, who has trained 'and owned horses because 'he loved doing so and for the pleasure they gave Win, and who has only been able in pursuit of this honour to maintain a small;stable. ; .....'.. .'. v *-'■;'•'" v . "

,-':-:"After- nearly a hundred years it has been demonstrated .that a 'Derby winner can ; be ; ,trained at Epsom. For until April tlieyFifth'.cam'S—he was' practically unheard bf little inoi-e than a month ago— there .-had, .been. ..only: one Epsom-trained winner J ofrthe -Derby. That -was Amato, who in',lß3B 'made his first acquaintance with a racecourse when he won the Derby. He 'rieyer ran;again,, and his: bones-':are buried -in the plantation between .; The Durdans and the Epsom paddock: Only once before,has ah owner-trainer -"won the Derby.' That was Chevalier Ginistrelli, with Signorinetta. Thank goodness, the world has '-much more cause for rejoicing over the result t<>-day. . . .-.

"My narrative would not be complete ivithoitt. paying a sincere compliment to the jockey, Fred Lane. His greatest contemporary 'could not haVe done better, because it required quick thinking, resource, and first-class[ability, to get April the Fifth.;^ Extricated from an awkward position into,- the; winning, one. ■ .Lane .lias been.rather;neglected of late; but his-luck1 ti)rned;;"(iuite recently- and 'he has now gaiiied-the-summit of a: long -and. honoiirable.careerJ*i>-;: ;i-.'•■"..."•.:.;':.'v-■.'-■' ...'■■ ■. ■. V- "

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19320706.2.29.1

Bibliographic details

SENSATIONAL DERBY, Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 5, 6 July 1932

Word Count
1,712

SENSATIONAL DERBY Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 5, 6 July 1932

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