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RACE SEEN IN LONDON

WINNER'S BREEDING

TELEVISION EXPERIMENT

(Eeceived 2nd June, 1 p.m.)

LONDON, Ist June. The, television experiment with the Derby was successful. Two thousand people, in the Victoria Theatre saw the race on the screen from the start to the finish, and finally saw three horses pass the post. Everything was easily visible.

NEW ZEALAND INTEREST

(By "Rangatira.")

Although cable advice received two days ago showed that April the Fifth had recently come into fairly strong favour for the Derby, no one would have placed him among the first twenty or thirty selections a couple of months ago. Even the day before the Two Thousand Guineas was run (27th April) he was quoted at the rank outside price of the fourteen probable starters for that classic, his price then being a hundred to one, with Hesperus next above him at sixty-six to one. . He ran unplaced, so that it is evident he must have burst into the form that enabled him to win yesterday's Derby only during the last month.

As far as reports to hand show April the Fifth had not previously won a race, though he probably scored' in one or two events during May. As a two-year-old he started three times, for a sixth at his first outing, and outside the first ten horses in his other two. This season, prior to contesting the Guineas, his only start was in the Birmingham Stakes, a handicap over one mile, run on 31st March, in which he finished strongly into, fourth place behind Zarette (a filly by Sansovino), Cider Prince, and Wellington. On that occasion he was burdened with only 7.11. ' ' . INTERESTINGLY' BRED COLT. His breeding is interesting, as it will be seen from the following particulars that he comes from the Bruce Lowe Number 18 family, which has easily the most successful record in the New Zealand Derby. The family has never been reckoned of special account in England. He is a brown colt by Crag an Eran from Sold Again, and was bred by Mr. 6. S. L. Whitelaw. Sent up to the yearling sales in 1930, he was bought

by Mr. S. McGregor on behalf of his present owner, the actor-trainer, Mr. Tom "Walls, for 200 guineas. Sold Again, his dam, is given as a 1920 bay mare by Call o> tho Wiids (son of Polymelus) from Market, by Marcovil (son of Marco and grandson of Barcaiaine) from Fairmile, by Common (son of Isonomy) from Lady Clarendon, by Hampton from Summer Evo, by Stockwell. She was bred by Lord Ellersmere', and is a member of the No. 18 family. The branch of the No. 18 family to which Sold Again (and therefore April the Fifth) belongs is that established early last century by the Snap mare Signora. , Its most notable representatives in New Zealand have been Multiform and Uniform, both winners of the New Zealand Derby. The family has been more successful in the Derbies here through other branches, and it easily takes first place with its winners. Of the seventy-three New Zealand Derbies that have been decided, for instance, fourteen have come from the No. 18 family, the No. 14 family being second with eight winners. Most of the winners other than Uniform and Multiform have come through the branch established by the Young Belgrade mare. This branch, besides, has been responsible for such great horses in this country as Trenton and Sir Hercules. Flora Melvor and Frailty are two of the early imported mares who did so much to establish the line here. SIRE SECOND IN,,DERBY. April the Fifth's sire, Crag an Eran, is a full brother in blood to Buchan, being a bay horse by Sunstar (Sundridge— Amphion—Speculum) from Maid of the Mist, by Cyllene (grandson of Bend Or) from Sceptre, by Persimmon (son of St. Simon) from Ornament, by Bend Or from Lily Agnes, by Marearoni. He was bred in 1918 by Lord Astor, and belongs to the No. 16 family, recognised as one of the best male lines. In 1929, when he got April the Fifth, he was standing at 200 guineas. It may be noted that in five removes of this sire's pedigree there is no direct No. 18 blood, so that the nick that produced April the Fifth is probably not of No. 18 blood.

Crag an Eran won the Two Thousand Guineas in 1921, wa3 second beaten by a neck to Humorist in the Derby, and was fourth in the St. deger. in the Derby hi ■ drew the outside mark, so his performance was on a par with the winner's. His only other starts that season were in the St. James Palace Stakes and the Eclipse Stakes,-ioth of which he won in a canter. As a twor year-old he had started, twice, being second with top weight in the Salisbury Foal Stakes. He was retired after contesting tfte St. Leger, with stake winnings amounting to £15,345. Horses he has left include (besides April the Fifth) Eagle Eock, Sea Crag, Abadan, Mon. Talisman' (good winner in France), and Lavinia (good winner in Austria). >

The owner of April the Fifth, Mr. T. Walls, had not previously won a nlassic. At about this time last year he was very seriously ill, and was sevaral months in recovering. His first appearance on a racecourse last season was at Gatwick in September to. see April the Fifth run sixth in his first race. On that occasion he watched the races from his car, which he had been allowed to have driven on to the centre of the course behind the winning post v He started three horses during the afternoon, and viewed them with a sea telescope. He is very popular with owners, other trainers, and jockeys, and no doubt his victory in the Derby yesterday would have been most enthusiastically received. \

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19320602.2.57.4

Bibliographic details

RACE SEEN IN LONDON WINNER'S BREEDING, Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 129, 2 June 1932

Word Count
971

RACE SEEN IN LONDON WINNER'S BREEDING Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 129, 2 June 1932

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