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NEWS OF THE DAY

Yesterday in Parliament.

There was a ' three-and-a-half hour sitting of the House of Representatives yesterday afternoon, when the National Expenditure Adjustment Bill was read a third time and passed, three weeks after ,its introduction. The third reading speeches from the Opposition benches detailed the proceedings in Committee, and emphasised the Labour viewppint that the measure would aggravate rather than alleviate the economic situation. The Minister of Internal Affairs (the Hon. A. Hamilton) outlined the estimated reductions, in fixed charges which would follow' the passage of the Bill and quoted the latest figures prepared by the Government Statistician, showing that there had be-en a substantial decline in the cost of living in the last two years. A spirited defence of the Government's policy was made by the Prime Minister (the Eight Hon. G. W. Forbes), who accused the Labour Party of endeavouring to make capital out of the position. The Minister of Finance (the Hon. W. Downie Stewart) made a statement promising to afford the taxpayers breathing space and, as an alternative to further exhausting the country 's • taxable capacity, indicated that he had made an arrangement with the banks to obtain £2,500,000 by hypothecation of reserves invested in Discharged Soldiers' Settlement Mortgages. The House adjourned until 2.30 p.m. on Tuesday, when it will consider the TraoTe Agreement. (New Zealand and Canada) Ratification Bill. Ball Hut Extensions. Additions are being made to the Ball Hut, on the Tasman Glacier, states the " Christchureli Times.' ? Carpenters from the Hermitage have been at work on the hut for several days, and their task is bow almost finished. The length of the hut has been increased substantially. Where there were only two tiers of single bunks, visitors to this year's winter sports will find three, a third tier having been built into the old hut and the extension having a triple set built in. This new triple set comprises twentiy-f our bunks, making provision fop accommodation of a total of sixty, sleepers. '

Economy Commission's Report. The Prime Minister announced last night that an extension of a month has been granted the National Expenditure Commission for the preparation of its final report. Originally the Commission was required to submit an interim report by Ist March and a final report by Ist May; the main report is now to be completed by Ist June. Cosmic Radiations. Observations of the powerful radiations -which come to the earth through outer space, for the results of which the scientific world is eagerly waiting, were made by Professor Arthur H. Compton at the Ball Hut last weekend (states the "Christchurch Times"). Professor Compton, distinguished American physicist, personally superintended the transport of nearly four hundredweight of scientific instruments through hampering soft snow to thespot on the Ball Pass, 7000 feet above sea level, where the.observations were taken. The instruments, in packs averaging- fifty pounds each, were carried Up and down in relays by a party of eight, led by guides Alf. Brustad and Vie. Williams. On Saturday night, all the instruments were at the hut, and on Sunday the scientists, including Professor P. "W. Burbidge, of Auckland University College, and Dr. C. M. Foeken, Lecturer in Physics at Otago University, climbed to the Ball Pass, where readings were made. The party spent Sunday night at the Ball Hut, and on Monday the instruments were carried back through the soft snow to The- Hermitage. The guides agreed that the transport of'the equipment was the most difficult task ever undertaken on the Tasman Glacier. The laborious journeys, both up and down, were accomplished without mishap of any sort. It is hoped that when Professor Compton returns to Wellington he willgive a public lecture on cosmic radiations. Statue of Captain Cook. The statue of Captain James Cook, which has been presented to the city by Mr. M. F. Barnett, of Christchureh, and for which the sculptor is Mr. W. T. Trethewey, is nearing completion, states "The Press." On Wednesday a meeting of the committee was held to. arrange details in connection with the unveiling ceremony. It was reported that it was expected that' the statue would be ready, to be erected in two months. It is hoped that His Excellency, the Governor-General, Lord Bledisloe, .will be able to officiate at the unveiling ceremony, and the Mayor (Mr. D. G. Sullivan, M.P.) is to lie asked to approach His Excellency on tEe subject. A sub-committee- was set to- make suggestions as to the inscription for the pedestal. Salmon Fisheries. ■ The efforts to establish Atlantic and quinnat salmon in. the Wanganul Eiver are referred to in. the annual report of the Wanganui Acclimatisation Society. "It is. to be regretted," says the report, "that the effort to establish Atlantic salmon in the Wanganui Eiver has not been successful. The local society subsidised by a grant the establishment of a hatchery on the river near Taumarunui in 1923, and eyed Ova have been hatched out and liberated every. year since then, but there has been no authentic case -of a sea run. salmon having returned to the river. Possibly the main reason for the nonsuccess is due to the higher temperature of_ our^ river waters." Begarding quinnat salmon, the report states; "While Atlantic salmon have not been the success hoped for quinnat salmon have done particularly well and the council of the society is now investigating the question whether it would be desirable to have/an effort made to 'intensively stock the river with quinnat. If the investigations are satisfactory, it is proposed that the society should make a monetary grant toward this object. While the quinnat. has not the same sporting value as the Atlantic salmon, still it is an edible fish of first-class quality and provides good sport for anglers. Pish of 401b. in weight and more have been taken in the South Island and one or two smaller specimens have already been caught in the Wanganui Eiver. This salmon is not a true homer like the Atlantic salmon and those in a position to know state that the Wanganui Eiver is eminently suitable • for the establishment of the quinnat." Irish Free State. The Irish Free State will not be a Eepublie for many years to come, if at all, according to the Eev. Father P. J. Cooney, of Lyttelton (states the "Christchurch Times"). Father Cooney stated on Tuesday that the strong move by Mr. de Valera for the abolition of the Oath and the formation of an Irish Eepublie was purely a question of political parties, and was not of a serious nature at all.- Mr. de Valera, he said, had no mandate from the people of the Free State for the formation af a republic. If the wording of the Oath of allegiance to the British Empire were changed, continued Father Cooney, it would not make much difference. The people of the Free State were not worrying about a republic, and it was not on that political plank that .Mr. de Valera was elected. The Cosgrave party had shown neglect in certain directions, particularly in, regard to the working people, and Mr. de Valera's success at the-polls was really due to that failing, in the previous Government, and not to any popular outcry for a republic. Mr. de Valera was clamouring for abolition of the Oath because that cry was popular with a few. Father Cooney considered that the .formation of a Republic would not affect in the least Irishman who were domiciled in New Zealand or elsewhere. Those Irishmen, had come to the Dominion as British subjects, and as long as they elected to stay here they would have the right to be citizens of the British Empire.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19320430.2.56

Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY, Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 24, 30 April 1932

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1,277

NEWS OF THE DAY Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 24, 30 April 1932

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