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NEWS OF THE DAY

Holidays Eliding. The school- holidays are now almost over, and next week the majority of scholars will be back in the classrooms. Primary schools resume on Monday, and secondary schools on Tuesday. There are several private colleges whic' reopen at a later date. Victoria University College resumes classed early in March. , An, Adequate Reason. - "Is it correct that-some of tho staff have been, deprived of their morning tea?" asked Mr. B. MoTaggart at-last week's meeting of the Grey Hospital Bo&rd (reports the "Star"). ,Mr. Fraser, House* Manager: "Yes, two of the unemployed have been deprived -of it. They were taking half an Jiour over it, and making a lounge of •■ the place. The weeds were catching up on them, and if they, had stayed much longer they wouldn't have been able to find the place where they knocked off." ' The Babbits Not Depressed. ' Babbits are plentiful in Alexandra, no doubt ; owing to the poor prices which were offering for skins last season. It is considered quite within-the realms of possibility that the rabbit freezing works, which have'been closed for the past 12 years, may be opened this season. Apromifflent businessman from Dunedinj who is interested-in/tho ■rabbit industry, was in Alexandra lately making inquiries into the matter. This, would mean much to the district. Previously the general running eiponses were too hi,gh to be profitable, arid now, with the advent of electricity, profitable working is considered feasible. Boys Will be Boys. , - "The boys of to-day are not as moral as they used to be," said Mr. "J. W. Preen, at last week's meeting of tho Canterbury Board of Education, when complaining that a school garden had been robbed, involving not only tho loss of the vegetables which had been growing in it, but also of the'school repords, on which the-progress of tho children had been based (reports "The-Press"). He wanted tho matter to be given tho fullest publicity in order that the practice might bo stopped. "We used to \4e punished for robbing orchards in our time," added Mr. Preen. ".But you did it, all the same," remarked another member. There was a tendency among youngsters to-day to regard public property as their own, concluded Mr. Preen, and tho case he had roeiitionqd was detrimental to the Agricultural Department of the board.

I Good Attendance Record. In a letter which was before the Wellington Education Board to-day, the ■ headmaster of the Hastwell School, • Wairarapa, stated that the rather line : attendance of his pupils1 might bo of i interest to" the board. Of an average roll of 50.5, no fewer than 28 pupils qualified for good attendance certificates. A very large percentage of . those , qualifying walked distances up . to three miles daily. The acting-senior inspector (Mr. W. J. Boden) commented that the record was a very good one for I the class of school. ' Wainui Tunnel Work Begun. . . Work commenced on the Wainui tunnel on Monday morning. A 1 con- , tract has been let to a co-operative party of five experienced tunnellcrs, who are now feusy preparing a perpendicular rock face for the building of the portal. A terrace has been cleared i at the entrance, which is just south of the Wainui pipe line, and some dis- . tance up the face of the hill, and on this the workshops and power-house : have been erected. The plant con- ■ sists of a 90 h.p. electric motor, which ; will be used principally for compressing ' air to Tvork the drills and* for tlie con- ' crete gun for facing the' tunnel. Air i Will also be pumped fo the purpose of ! ventilation. Dining quarters and bath- , ing facilities for the men are being i constructed. It is expected that more men will be employed after Ist Feb--1 ruprj " ': School Chimneys. ' . In view of the fact that the e,himneys lat several of the primary schools in ; the Wellington district are built near ■ doorways, members of the Wellington ", Education Boiird expressed'concern to--1 day when advice .was received from the 1 Education .Department that the grant • approved on 29th July, 1931, for the j removal of pediments and chimneys likely to be dangerous in time of earthquake must be regarded as cancelled.----1 It was stated that most of the chimneys i regarded as dangerous had been altered, I but there were still some cases where attention was required. On the motion ' of Mr. T. W. McDonald, it was decided to write; to the Department pointing > out the serious position and asking for . a grant sufficient to cover the necessary -work. , • Sanders Cup Expenses. : "I think we can congratulate ourselves on having run the contest within -reasonable limits, .considering the ' times," remarked the chairman (Mr. O. ' A. tMoller) at last evening's meeting of i the Wellington Provincial Yacht and . Motor-boat Association, during; a discussion on the Sanders Cup expenses. It was reported that the actual cost of the 1 contest in cash expended was under '< £50. Mr. Moller said that on one occa- [ sion when ho was connected with a contest in another centre the cost ran into .some hundreds of pounds. The as- ! sociation's hearty thanks were accord ■ ed all who-assisted to make tho content' an outstanding success, including launch owners, motorists, business .firms, and the Harbour Board. Noxious Weeds to Hutt Valley. MI want to emphasise the danger to 'the Hutt Valley from blackberry. , The land about Hutt is too good to '. be choked by blackberry," said Mr. EL ~E. Leighton last evening at a meet- ; ing of the ■ Biver Board. He "stated that he, did not know whether there ■ was.any blackberry on the board's lands, but on Government lands and on the banks of the Waiwetu Stream . it' was becoming a pest;' "We do not , want," he sai,d, "the Hutt to become lilce lands between Nelson and West..port, which Tiave , become useless through the pest, owing to birds carrying the seeds.. The number of noxious wneds which is allowed to j thrive throughout the Hutt Valley is /terrible. Fennel and ragwort are to be found everywhere, tho. latter being thick in Strand Park. Surely tho unemployed could be put to work clearing this." Cornwell Cup Racing, Threo Takapuna class boats have ar- , rived from Lyttelton for use in the ' Cornwell Cup contest and are housed ' in 1 the Evans Bay clubhouse. One of them, the Winsome, is twenty-one years old. With six Wellington boats avail- . able ample provision has been mado ; for v the eight crews who will "be taking part in .tho racing. The widespread i interest in the contest is shown by, the fact that one of the Wellington' ljoats has been purchased by Southland with a view: to Invercargill's being represented for the first time in next year's series.! . . .. ~: '.■:■' Grant for School Maintenance. The Wellington Education Board was_ I officially notified to-day that the amount" k voted by Parliament for the1 mainten- , ance-of primary school buildpigs in the Wellington district- in 1931-32 was" 1 £8460, a reduction of £3337 below the : previous annual vote. "This is very unpleasant news," remarked the chair- : man, Mr. T. Forsyth, "but I think that ' under the present conditions we will 1 have to do the best, we can with the money. Fortunately, most of our schools are in a fair'state of maintenance. . .-. This-is going to affect us mainly during the current year." " Fewer Crossing Accidents. Though tho number of motoring ; fatalities last year was substantially ; greater than in any previous year, the level crossing fatalities were happily much fewer than for ithe preceding [ year; 13 persons were killed and 21 in.- . jured, as compared with 34 killed and .52 injured in 1930. The high figure' of 1930 'was largely accounted for Iby two very bad crossing smashes —a collision between a bus and a train at Hikurangi and a collision between a car and train at Sockburn—these two accidents resulting in* the loss of twelve ■ lives. There were;' 34 ' level crossing, accidents last year, compared with 65 mthe previous .year, and there appears ; to be good reason for believing that the ' installation of warning signals at the* ■ most dangerous crossings and the pub- : licity given' to the necessity for the i exercise of greater care' are bringing 'good-results. During the past ten ye^rs i the total, number of crossing accident deaths was ,149-. and the total number o£ persons injiir.ed \yas, 468. Practically every one .of these accidents could have been avoided by the exetfcise of , fgreater*care and caution. [ A Law "Unto Themselves. ■ When a .letter, came before the last , meeting of the (Santerbury Education Board from the Health Department, ; stating that it had been decided to i divide the Dominion into four dental i "districts, each to be under the control . of a different officer, Mr. C. S. Thomp- , son-said that he favoured the change , for the reason that dental nurses were i a : law uiot'o themselves, and should be brought under' discipline; On Mr. ! Thompson's'motion it was decided to refer the matter back to the Appointments Committee to get an expression of opinion as ,fo whether dental nurses i should be placed under the charge of , headmasters in the districts. It was i reported that Mr. A. D. Brice would l be in charge of the Canterbury, West- [ land, and Nelson district. i Where Fat Lambs Thrive. , The largest consignment of fat lambs' ' from the Waikaka Valley district, coin- . prising 34 trucks, was railed to the i works last week (says tho "Southland Times"). Although dredged land is i generally considered of little value for ' pastoral purposes,-this consignment mii eluded a very fine draft of lambs that' ■ had1 been raised on land dredged, ap- ; proximately half of which had not been stripped. The farmer consigning the . lambs stated that the best lambs on the . farm came off the dredged land, which ■ had carried over two fat lambs to the acre.

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY, Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 22, 27 January 1932

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1,638

NEWS OF THE DAY Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 22, 27 January 1932

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