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ACCIDENT AT WASHDYKE

The unfortunate accidents in flat races at both the Ashburton and Ooraldine meetings last month were followed by finother mishap fit Waslidyke on Saturday (states the '"Press"). The field for the Tycho Hack Handicap had covered a furJong when Rosewood, cm the rails, stumbled and fell, and before she could rise, Congo, who was glow away, crashed over Jier. N. Dwyer, rider of Rosewood, escaped injury, but L. Pratt, rider of Congo, and apprenticed to E. J. Ellis, suffered a. broken thigh.

An inquiry was Inter instituted by <he stewards, who were satisfied that the tall of Rosewood wag quite accidental. It is satisfactory to note that in each of the ihree accidents cited, the cause was found to be unavoidable, find not due in any ■way to negligent or faulty horsemanship.

CAMERONIAN'S DEFEAT

SENSATION IN ST. LEGER

"LITERALLY WENT MAD"

(From "The Post's" Representative.)

LONDON, ]lth September.

The Turf sensation of Doncaster week was the defeat of Cameronian in the St. Leger. The winner of the Derby and the Two Thousand Guineas was favourite, and was expected to attain the "triple crown," but he finished last. It was such a bad last that it was obvious something unusual had happened to the colt, and, examined by a veterinary surgeon immediately after the race, he was found to have a temperature of 103. One of the racing correspondents who was at Doncaster for the meeting reports that Cameroniau fought for his head on the way to the post, and ho pulled so hard that he went further than the others before his jockey (F. Fox) could stop him and return to the starting gate. He was impetuous from the start, and Fox had great difficulty in restraining him. Fox had no chance (o ride a waiting race, for Cameronian would not let him, and the best that the jockey could do was to make him stay in fourth place for the first six furlongs. At half-way he ran up to second behind Sir Andrew', and was not more, than a length behind that horse when they reached the straight. Immediately the turn had been made he wavered in his course and collapsed. .From that point the field passed him one by one, and he finished over a hundred yards behind the winner, Lord PJosebery's Sandwich, second in the Derby. Open, owned by Sir John Rutherford, was beautifully ridden by J. Childs, and got on terras with Sir Andrew, but two furlongs from the end Sandwich (H. Wragg up) raced past him in irresistible mariner and won by four lengths. Sir Andrew was beaten by a length for second place by Orpen, and then came Convoy (Mr. 'A. E. Cox), followed by Khorshecd (H. H. Aga Khan) and Salaam (Lord Derby). The time, Sruin 11 l-ssec, was the slowest since Book Law's year. The-distance of the St. Leger is about 1 mile 6 furlongs 132 yards. Lord Kosebery is the senior steward of the Jockey Club this year, and this was his first classic success. Sandwich was bought as a yearling by him for 3600 guineas. He is a son of Waffles, dam of Slanna, the Derby winner of 1925. As for Cameronian, Fox said: "It was obvious when I got him to the post that there was something wrong. He was very upset aud kicked Orpcn. lie then literally went mad, ran himself right out, and was completely done with after turning into the straight."

F. Darling, the Bcekhampton trainer, was much disappointed. He said: "There are various causes for horses going suddenly wrong in this way, and I put no sinister construction whatever upon the occurrence. Thefb is no question of the horse's having been got at, or anything'of "that kind. It was all bo unexpected, for we had come to regard Cameronian as one of the most sober horses in- training. Here he was like a horse possessed."

Lord Kosebery> naturally, was overwhelmed with .congratulations. After the excitement was "over he called .Wragg from the weighing-room to receive the congratulations of Mr. J. J. Maher, the breeder of Sandwich. Mr. Maher (remarks "The Sporting Life") has achieved notable successes as a breeder. He bred Caligula, who wou the St. Leger, Manna, the Derby winner, St. Louis, the winner of the Two Thousand Guineas, and the feclipse winner, Royal Minstrel. Lord Roseber^.has-^Wia : jrß'"beleii"-a'le'ffe'at'l)elicvci1 in the staying? powers: of Sandwich, ■ but he remarked:'"! am' not altogether surprised that h? has not been pleasing those who have' witnessed his gallops of late, as he is such a lazy horse at home and needs the excitement of a race to rouse him."1 The horse is trained;.by /J. L. Jarvis, at Newmarket.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19311021.2.19.4

Bibliographic details

ACCIDENT AT WASHDYKE, Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 97, 21 October 1931

Word Count
782

ACCIDENT AT WASHDYKE Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 97, 21 October 1931

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