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FOR THE GAMES

AMATEUJI BOXEJiS

THREE BOYS CHOSEN

PURDIE, LOWE

THOMAS

At a ineeliiin of the New Zealand Boxing Council this week il. was decid-

Ed tv Humiliate three amateur boxers to represent New Zealand at tho Olympic Games, which are to bo hold in Los Angeles next year. The three boys chosen, by the council's selection committee are Bert Lowe, of Duucdin, Harold Thomas, of Wellington, and Bob Purdie, of Auckland.

The selection of the three bo,\ s named was generally considered likely after the last New Zealand amateur championships held in Ashburton in August. At those championships the New Zealand Council had three representatives watching the performances with a view to reporting to tho council on boys whom it was considered were up to Olympic standard. The three gentlemen were Messrs. Karl Stewart, of Wellington, Neil M'Lean, of Auckland, and Jack Kilmartin, of Dunedin. The boysj who have now been nominated, were easily the most outstanding performers at tho championships, and the selectors were unanimous in each choosing the same boys in their separate reports to tho council.

The selection of these-throe boxers, however, is not an unqualified one, and flic council has made a. provision that the chances of the boys making the trip to the, Games depends upon whether they retain their present form. They have nut been nominated for any particular weights, and it is quite' likely, as was the caso with Ted Morgan at the last Olympic Games, that the present nominees (or two of them at any rate) will liavo to each light.in weights above those in which they are now champions of New Zealand.

Undoubtedly the selectors' lirst choice must have been Bert Lowe, the youthful Dunedhi welterweight. For two years' in succession Lowo has won the New Zealand championship at his weight, and it is casting no reflection on the other two.boys to say that ho has the most chance of success at the Games. Ho carries a knock-out punch in both hands, and both at Ashburton and at Palmerston North last year ho won the majority of his bouts by knocking his opponent out. In the ring Lowe's style is not very pretty, but it is effective enough, and lie shows great ability in being able to work his man into a position for a deciding punch. Since the last championships Lowe has grown into a middle-weight, and if he goes to the Games it is almost certain that ho will box in this division.

In Harold Thomas Wellington has a worthy representative, for he, too, has won a title at the New Zealand championships in the past two years. Thomas is a fast and scientific lightweight boxer whoso speed and particularly fast and at times vicious two-handed hitting mako him a very hard man to boat. He has been boxing in public competition for just on six years, and his experience has often stood to him. Possibly better than any other amateur boxer in .Now Zealand at present, Thomas is able to work out a plan for defeating an opponent, and put it into operation in tho ring.

The last of the trio, Bob Purdlo, bears a name which is pronounced tho same as that of an earlier New Zealand Olympic Games representative, and liko his namesake the present contender for Games honours lias established a reputation as a fast, pretty, scientific boxer. As a stylist Purdio is worth watching, for everything he does is done correctly. In the opinion of some judges hia lack of a really heavy punch, one which would knock down or knock out another boxer, will militate against the Auckland boy's success at tho Games; but Purdio has given good evidence that ho can punch hard enough when the opportunity offers, although generally ho concentrates inoro on beating his opponent on points than in knocking him out. Purdie won tho feathei1-weight championship in 1930 and 1931. At Palmcrston North in 1930 he was awarded the Jamioson Belt for being the most scientific boxer, an honour which fell to Harold Thomas this year.

The thrco boys are all young, and there can bo no doubt that should they eventually roach tho Games, they will worthily uphold the sporting traditions of the country, both in and out of tho ring.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19311021.2.102

Bibliographic details

FOR THE GAMES, Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 97, 21 October 1931

Word Count
714

FOR THE GAMES Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 97, 21 October 1931

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