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ENGLISH YOUNGSTERS

ANOTHER VINTAGE YEAR?

SEASONS THREE BEST

Although last year is generally recognised as having been ii vintage year for two-year-olds in England, bays the "Special Commissioner" iv the "Sporting Life," this year's lot arc oven more impressive, and he mentions Cliifctine, Cockpen, arid tho unnamed .Gainsborough—Golden Hair colt as among the best youngsters he can lemember having secu out in auy July. All have been winners, and are certain to make next year's classics interesting *if they train on right. CLUSTINE'S CLAIM. Clustine is a son of the Dei by winner Captain Cuttle, who, like Call -..Boy and Coronach, claims Hurry On as his sire, and is out of La Mauri, a three-parts sister-in-blood to the' Two Thousand Guineas winner Tctratema. being by his grandsire, Koi Uerode, out of an ownsister—La Maula—to his dam Scotch Gift. La Maula, who was by Symington out o£ Mauud, by the Prince of Wales' Stakes winner Tarporley, was bred by the late Mr. 'li. Kennedy, of the Straffan Station Stud, and was sold by him to Mr. "Atty" Fersse at the December sales of 1910 for 1200gns. She was then ■ seven years old, and was bought by the Stockbridge trainer, apparently because of her relationship to. the.dam of the Guiueas winner. She ran eight times without a bracket upon the racecourse, and bad done little in the, paddockii. For Mi-. Persse she ■ bt'ed La Mauri to Roi Uerode, and this filly was sold to the Apia Khan as n .yearling at the Second July Sales of 1923 for 560gns. Appearing only as a two-year-old, La' Mauri ran three times, and after winning the Somerville. StaKes and running second to 'Diomedea iii tho Saxham Stakes, went to the paddocks, wheto she has produced Nijinski ' (winner of this year's London Cup and Irish Oaks), Aveline, La Boni, and now Olustine. Clustine first saw daylight in Ireland, and «as-sold by the Aga Khan to his present owner,' Mr. A. K. Macomber, at the last Deauville Yearling Sales for SOO guineas. A grandly made colt, with plenty ok' scope and reach, ho will, if all goes well, be one to think about iv connection with next year's classic events. , His next appearance will probably be in the Clearwell Stakes in October. -SON OF BUCHAN. Passing on to Cockpen. Here there is a chestnut son of Buchan, a son- of Simitar that ran second to Grand' Parade in the Derby of 1919, out of Margeritta. a Charles O'Mallcy mare, whoso third dam was Sisterlike, a daughter of Ladas from Sister Lucy, the dam a!s6 of Lucinda and the Biennial Stakes winner Brother Bill. Sistcrlike, who was bred by the ,late Lord Roscberry^ never appeared upon- a racecourse, but at the,stud produced such winners as Stornoway and. Sebastian, and also Cirencester, a daughter of Cicero that never ran, but in the paddocks became the dam of Corinium, . Montrcuil. and Coucy before being exported to Argentina, Coucy passed from her breeder's (Lord Londonderry) hands into the possession of Mr. IS, Bellaney, who was responsible for the production, of Margeiitta, a mare that he sold to Lord Woolavington as a yearling for lO.'Ugns, and who as a two-year-old was reckoned to be the second best filly of-her year on account of her successes in the Queen 'Mary Stakes,- the I'ulbournc Stakes, and three other events, valued at £6027. Going to the paddocks in 1935, Margeritta foaled Finola in 1926, Maid Margaret in 1927, a chestnut filly by Captain Cuttle in 1928, and Cockpen. in This season Cockpen has appeared twice and has won both his races with consummate ease. ~ His pedigree does not read to be quite sound enough to be' that of a really great horse, but there is no doubt about his brilliance, and much more should, be beard of him.' GOLDEN HAIR COLT. One whose' breeding is more attractive probably than' Coekpen's is the Gainsborough—Golden Hair colt, who has floored in hia last two attempts and was third at his only other appearance. Golden Hair was bred by Mr. Gilbert Robinson—of Bracket fame—and was by Golden Sun (a son of Sundridge) from Tendril, by St. Simon from Sweetwater, by Hampton. The female line here is of the No. 10 family, which has been rather in the shade for the last few years, but it mußt be lemembeied that Tendril produced such.useful winners as Daughter of the Vine and Springshoot, and that, though never brilliant, Golden Hair won good races when under the charge of Roy Pope, of Royston^ Sold originally as a, yearling by Mr. Robinson for 500gns, Golden Hair won a maideu- race at Manchester in her first season, and as a three-year-old earned brackets at Lanark,- Newmarket, and Liverpool. Nothing came her way as a four-year-old, and at the end of 1925 she was sold to Sir Alec Bkck at the Newmarket Second October Sales for 800gns. '■„ . This purchase was apparently made on> behalf of Mrs. X!. Clayton, as under her came Golden Hair appeared in the December Sales catalogue of 3927 and was gold to Lord Furnesi for 4400gns. She had then been covered,l by Tetratema, but provedbarren, and at the next mating, to Gainsborough, produced ,the present colt, who made 3000gns as a yearling at the last Doncaster Sales. I

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Bibliographic details

ENGLISH YOUNGSTERS, Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 62, 10 September 1931

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877

ENGLISH YOUNGSTERS Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 62, 10 September 1931

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