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THE DERBY

CAMERONIAN'S WIN

A WONDERFUL DAY

EECOBD FOR 'WELSHING'

(From "The Post's" Representative.) LONDON, 4th June. . "Derby Day" was a' wonderful day for the vast multitude who went to Epsom, as [ well as for the bigger proportion of the populace who had not the opportunity of; seeing the races, for the chief event on the programme was won by the favourite. The hero of the day was Gameronian, a three-year-old, bred by the late Lord Dewar, and owned now by Mr. J. A. Dewar, a nephew. The latter made no secret of his hope that he would succeed, though this great race had always evaded his uncle. At the Press Club luncheon, held two days previously—an annual' event when owners, trainers, and jockeys are the guests of the club—Mr. Dewar invited by Mr. .Edgar Wallace, (chairman) to "tell the truth about Cameronian," said: "1 am probably the most lucky person in England to be standing in this position, hay.ing. only just embarked on a racing career, i hope Scotsmen always tell .the truth. As you probably all know, often on the Derby morning you have a hero. Mine, has been a-hero ever since the' Two Thousand Guineas. Let us hope he will not be a zero iv the evening. .He is fit and well; my trainer, to whom I. owe so much, is fit and well; Fox is -fit' and well. What does it matter about the condition of the owner?! will let you into a personal secret. It is a long time since I had a new top hat. I thought this would be an occasion on which I might spend a few shillings and buy a new. one." All along, Cameronian had been the favourite, but there were many, searchers for a good outsider, as Cameronian had.not yet publicly5 proved his ability to get the distance, about one mile and a half. He won the Two Thousand. Guineas, a mile race, and he stayed the' Newmarket course well, but students of breeding felt doubtful'because; he IB by-Pharos, who was by Pharlaris, and the best distance of horses bred from that, line has always been rather less than a mile and a naif. r .tiis dam was Una Cameron, who was by Gainsborough,,and she herself Was bred to However, Cameronian was an undoubted first, and he thus has brought off the "double"—that is he has won the Two Thousand Guineas and now the Derby, as favourite—the'first horse to achieve this since Sunstar did the;double in 1911—the war years excepted. Now he is expected to attain the ('triple crown"—namely, the St. Leger—but that will not be just yet. A FIELD OF TWENTY-FIVE. v The field was made up of twenty-five runners, each carrying nine stone, and a perfect start was made •by Captain Allison, more quickly than usual. It got away m a line. The horses, were:—Cameronian b c by Pharos—Una Cameron, by Gainsborough (Mr. J. A.; Dewar), X Fox; Orpen, b c by Solario—Harpy (Sir J. Rutherford), K. A. Jones; Sandwich, b c by Sansovino—Waffles (Lord Rosebery), 11. Wragg; Goyescas (M. M. Boussac), L. C Elliott; Gallini (Sir E. Hanmer), J. Taylor; Pomme d'Api (H.H. Aga Khan), M. Beary; Jacopo (Mr. Marshall lueld), J. Childs; ■ Armagnac (Mr.;. A. .de Rothschild), IS.I Perryman; Rose en Spleil (Lord Howard de Walden), W.1 Turtle; Estate Duty (Lt.-Col. W. Guinness),. T,. Weston; Doctor Dolittle (Mr. A. F. Bassett), H. Beasley; Abbot's Worthy (Mi-. V. T. Thompson), Joe Canty; -Shell-Trans-port (Mr. W. M. Cazalet), R. Dick; Apperley (Mr. J. P. Hornung), B. Carslake; Lemonition (Mr; B: F. Sykes), J. Leach; Lightning Star(Mr.,J. B.Leigh), J. Marshall; Knoloma. (M. R. Kahn):,Sibbritt; Sir Andrew (Mr. W,m. 'Woodward), P, Beasley; Zanoft" (Mr. Z. G. Michalmos), J. Sirett; \Cheery Lad (Mr. T. W. Blenkiron), C. Ray; Goldstream (Lord Glanely), Gordon Richards; Grindleton (Mr. J. W. Sharpies), L.'Brown; Te Hau (Mr., B; Davis), T. Burns; Te Ruru (Mr. B. Davis), F. Herbert; Reveillon (Sir G. Bullough), H. Jelliss. -. ' • .;■-.-.. ■;"■ (Mr. B. Davis withdrew Kiatere.and Pnmitif,. found, to be lame, did not come, under starter/s orders.) ■■'," , ; , THE RACE DESCRIBED. The following interesting summary of the race has been made by Mr. Meyrick Good ("Sporting Life"):— ; ! ' "The field included many good-looking colts, Doctor Dolittle and Cameronian being the "gentlemen" of the party; albeit one could not help noticing the improvement that Pomme d'Api had made. "The Whatcombe horse, Orpen, and Apperley, were'the three coolest in the parade: Primitif was missing from the parade, as he was found to be lame, and his number was withdrawn from the frame. .;■ ,\~ .-. • "After coming under Captain Allison's orders at the post they appeared to be a fairly ruly lot, though Lightning Star hung back a little, in company, with. Sandwich. They would have been dispatched at the. first attempt had rnot'Doctor Dolittle backed away,' and then Shell Transport gave some transport. "When the tapes were released/ Cameronian was into :his stride in a flash, but after. leading .from Grindleton, Gallini, Estate Duty, and Knoloma, his jockey wisely steadied him, and Grindleton was allowed to' carry on. "■' . TE RURU '"'SOON TAILED OFF. "The three slowest to leave the gate were Lightning Star, Coldstream, and .Te Ruru, and the last-named soon became tailed, off. ,When half, a mile,had been ; covered Grindleton had about a neck advantage of Gallini, with Estate Duty, Cameronian, Leinomtiou, Reveillon, Rose en Soleil, and Sir Andrew next. . Then came' Goyescas, Jacopo, Armagnac, Abbots Worthy, and Shell Transport. "Before they reached the mile starting post, Gallini had taken up the running from Rose en Soleil and Estate: Duty, .Gamer nian, on the outside, heading Armagnac, Shell Transport, Knoloma, and Sandwich. The last-named, as the first bend was made,- was crowded upon, as was Doctor Dolittle, who was twice forced on to the rails, and he was badly pocketed from that point to Tattenham Corner. "Leinonitioii, who was well placed with the leaders at the'top of the hill, began to fall back, and Grindleton dropped right out of the running as they came down the hill.. Gallini was still showing the way to Rose en Soleil, Armagnac,: Estate Duty, Cameronian, Orpen, Shell Transport, and Reveillon. Armaguac headed Rose en Soleil, and moved up second to Gallini as Tattenham Corner was approached, where Cameronian was still going easily in his stride and on the bit. GALLINI LEADS INTO STRAIGHT. "Estate Duty hereabouts lost his place, and Goyescas and Sandwich improved. "Gallini _ came into the straight just in advance of Armagnac and. Cameronian, and with Estate Duty weakening, Orpen and Goyescas went. ahead of Weston's mount. Less than a furlong in the straight, Cameronian, on a tight rein, joined Gallini, and almost immediately drew to the front, going well within himself. . ' ' ■• "Fox, riding the coolest of races, soon hud the measure of Gallini, but a quarter of a mile from home Orpen drew up on the right of the favourite and joined issue. When Fox felt for his whip Cameronian jumped to it, and fairly bounded a length in front again. . ' . "Orpen stuck gamely to his task, but Cameronian, never flinching under pressure, held on to his advantage and won a beautifully ridden and an. exciting race by three parts of, a length; a similar distance separated second and1 third. The three placed horses were clear of the rest, Goyescas finishing fourth, three lengths away. ' . ' "Then almost in a line came Gallini, half a length off, sth; Pomme d'Api, head away, 6th; Jacopo, another head behind, was 7th. After ,an interval of a length came Armagnac (ran well), Bth; Rose en Soleil, one length away, Oth; Estate Duty, always prominent, 10(*i. "Then a gap before Doctor Dolittle, badly interfered with, 11th; Abbot's Worthy, 12th; Shell Transport, not disgraced, 13th; Apperjy, never very prominent, 14th; Lemonition, who ran fairly well, was 15th. Lightning Star, who ran disappointingly, was 16th; Knoloma, ran

well for a mile, 17th; Sir. Andrew,-never conspicuous, 18th; Zanoff, 19th; ' and Reveillon, last. "Time, 2min 36 3-ssec. "Orpen, who came second, is a beautifully bred horse, and Sandwich (third) is a well-bred colt by Sansovino out of Waffles,';'the dam. of Manna. Sansovino and Manna each •wonvthe'Derby. Sandwich won the Chester Vase, and showed by doing so that he could stay a mile and a half." HAPPIEST MAN IN.THE WORLD. .The last horse to win. the Two Thousand Guineas and the Derby was Manna, in 1925. He, too, was trained by Fred Darling.- As he led' Cameronian back to the unsaddling enclosure, Mr. Dewar said: "What can 1 say that will better express my feelings than that I am the most delighted man in the world, especially as Cameronian was such a big public favourite. The cheering which the horse and rider received as they the winning post gave me great pleasure. It showed that the public appreciated his gallant effort." Although : Fox has had a long and successful association with the Turf, lie had not previously ridden a winner of the Derby.. Twenty years ago he won the One Thousand Guineas on Atmah, and last year rode Diolite to victory in the Tiyo Thousand Guineas. He will retain affectionate memories of Cameronian. Fred Darling has established a post-war record with four Derby successes, and equals that of Charles Marsh with Persimmon, Jeddah, Diamond Jubilee, and Minoru. There is still - time for him to equal the achievement of the late John Porter, who trained six Derby winners. "Orpen was beaten by a better horse." —Sir ■ John Rutherford. "Doctor Dolittle never really had a clear run."—H. Beasley, jockey. "Sandwich was beaten by the bad draw."—J. Jar vis, trainer. BOOKMAKERS HARD HIT. Nearly a hundred miles of tartan and white ribbon and huge inverted jockeys' caps hung from the ceiling were used to decorate the Savoy Restaurant, vrhere Mr. Dewar gave a party to celebrate his victory. At midnight a complete film of the Derby was shown on a tartan-bordered screen. Celebrations all1 over the West End were on the customary large scale. Backers had- a good day, but it was a record' Derby for "welshing." One estimate put the number of "welshers" as over, fifty; A number of North London racegoers, who had taken a motor-coach to the Downs, were among the victims. The favourite s victory so . badly hit' a number of bookmakers that they were linablo:;to accept bets on the last race of the meeting.- ''■•'.; ' '•■ ' The "King and Queen, the Prince of Wales, the Duke and. Duchess of York, Prince George, Princess Mary, and her. husband, the Earl of Harewood, travelled to Epsom by road. . They.left Buckingham. Palace in three cars,,followed by two oilier cars carrying members of the Royal entourage. An enormous concourse of people waited on the Downs to cheer the Royal procession as it droye along the ccmrse to the grand stand, and the crowd was exceptionally demonstrative, for not only' was it the King's first appearance at the Derby since his illness, but it was also his birthday. The King wore a black silk hat, and had a carnation in his buttonhole. The Queen wore a doye-grey coat and a powder-blue toque. •The attendance is believed to, constitute a. record. Those, in charge of the car parks declared that the road traffic had never been so heavy. The vast sums subscribed to sweepstakes had aroused even greater interest than usual in this great national racing festival. Many visitors came from France, Belgium, and Holland in air liners to see the race. ' ' "BOTTLED SUNSHINE." ' Sir E. Hanmer's Gallini was the hope of ;the North. If he had won, the stable 'considered a fine compliment would be ■paid to African lucerne. > His trainer, Mr.'/'M. Peacock, calls it "bottled sunshine." The lucerne, he states, is imported; from South Africa for the use of their horses, because it is grown under such ideal conditions as regards "sunshine,' and, so contains an abundance of vitamins. ''We mix it with English .hay," Mr. Peacock said, "but English hay does not receive' sufficient sunshine to • contain the vitamin qualities of the South African lucerne: ;We attribute a great deal of oiu\ success "to the'use of:this lucerne,-be-ca\ise(it keeps.horses fitter for a remarks ably ■;long \ : period; they carry bloom and racing fitness longer." . "The.- shining coat of the muscled-up Gallini, seen on, the spacious Middleham Moor during last week-end, was convincing proof ' that "bottled:" sunshine" had played its part in the training of this handsome son of Spion Kop" (comments '"Sporting Life"). '-..■-■.• ~■ •■ , '■.-. ■ Asked by "The Scout" ("Daily Express" race expert) if he had ever contemplated notgoing in for .racing, and .; carrying on, Miv Dewar answered: "It is like this. They leave only ,the 'crumbs' to go on with-when death ,duties are paid, and even how racing, with all its joys and big race gains, reniains to me a problem for the'future. ; ■■'■'[ '■•'>■■ ■_' V , ~ "They will know'the result in Australia and '-far-flung cornersof the world in a few minutes. I only hope my uncle has been 'looking down' on ,the kindest colt he ever bred and and nominated, and knew our triumphs quicker than that! Mr. Dewar added with some emotion. Mr. Dewar can thank Mr. Edgar Wallace's test action and the clearing of the way for the' Jockey Club "to scrap the old: nomination-void rule, otherwise Cameron-, ian could not have run: at Newmarket and ;Epsom. : . ■~■-■•. •- CAPTAIN PIRANI'S PARTY.: New Zealanders went to Epsom in. large numbers, and by all manner of ways. In these days the motor-bus is a yery popular vehicle, and a suitable one, top, when each passenger is allowed a seat inside (in case of, rain) and a seat on top. _ The latter is an excellent vantage for viewing the big race, and, if well placed, for viewing all the races. This year Captain P. C. Pirani, who directs the New Zealand Travel Bureau, had a party* who occupied two • double-deckers. ' They all returned full; of enthusiasm of the arrangements made and of the excellent time they- had spent. It had been a thrilling day, and a lucky one. ■ The New Zealanders under Captain Pirani's aegis included: Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Macalister (Wellington), Mrs. A. G. Wilson and Miss Wilson (Wanganui), the Rev. Fr: O'Meegham and the Misses O'Meegham (2),: Mrs. Margaret Flower (Dpwer Hutt), Mr. and Mrs. •U. C. Housley (Mt. Eden), Mr., Mrs., and Miss. M'lntosh, Mr. G. A. Sharman (Christchurch) and son, the Misses Nutt (2) (Christchurch), the Misses Jones (2) (Dunedin), Mr. F. Gordon, Miss J- Hutchen (Wellington), Miss L.. -M. Haius (Gveenmeadows, Hawkes Bay), Miss 1. JS.. Palmer (Wellington), _^5. Johnson Brown, Mrs. and Miss Galbraith (Auckland), Miss E. Holloway (Epsom), Mr. Green, Mr. Barber.

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Bibliographic details

THE DERBY, Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 10, 11 July 1931

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2,422

THE DERBY Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 10, 11 July 1931

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