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EXPELLED BY PARTY

A NEW INDEPENDENT

MR. BLACK CHANGES OVER

"THE ONLY ATTITUDE"

Summary expulsion from the United Party is the penalty Mr. G. C. Black (Motueka) has paid for his voto with the Labour Party against the Government yesterday afternoon on the question of according urgency to the second reading of the Finance Bill. Mr. Black has accepted the position philosophically and thrown in his lot with the Independent group.

"Mr. Black's vote against tho Government on tho motion moved by myself claiming urgency for the passage of the second reading of tho Finance Bill," said the Prime Minister (the Right Hon. G. W. Forbes) in referring to the matter late last night, "can only be regarded as a dofinite indication that he no longer desires to support the United Party, which he was returned at the last election to do. An adverso vote, if carried against tho Government on a matter affecting its control of the business of Parliament, must bo accepted as a vote of no-con-fidence and would necessitate its resignation. Under those circumstances, I, as loader of the party, can only accept his decision and regret the parting of the ways." Mr. Black subsequently issued tlie following statement: "I have found it uecessary to disagree with the proposals of the Government as outlined in the Finance Bill at present before Parliament to meet the financial situation. I object also to this important matter being forced through tho House without the fullest consideration. Because I have adopted this attitude, the only attitude a genuine supporter of the late Prime Minister could adopt, the present leader has elected to decree that I am no longer a member of the United Party. I am consequently compelled to take my place on the Independent benches, but neither the attitude of Mr. Forbes nor my place on the Independent benches alter in tho slightest my democratic principles." Last evening Mr. Black, who has hitherto shared a back bench on the United sido of the House, removed to a rear place near the other Independents. NOT UNEXPECTED. Mr. Black's defection from the United ranks was not unexpected, marking as it does tho culmination of a series of differences that member has had with the Government since the illness and death of Sir Joseph Ward. The youngest member in a House of eighty, Mr. Black gained further prominence by receiving at tho bands of Sir Joseph Ward the Junior Whipship of the party, j but this position he voluntarily relinquished shortly before tho death of the late Prime Minister. The first serious clash with Cabinet centred round the appointment of the present clerk of the House of Representatives, Mr. Black vigorously criticising the method of appointment and publicly taking the Act-ing-Prime Minister to task. There was a strong impression current when the United Party met to elect a successor to Sir Joseph Ward that Mr. Black was definitely opposed to the selection of Mr. Forbes, and was prepared to support the nomination of tho Hon. 11. Atmore, the present Minister of Education. Following Mr. Forties's election to the leadership, Mr. Black was not again chosen Junior Whip, tho appointee on this occasion being Mr. E. F. Healy (Wairau). A strong supporter of railway construction in the South Island, Mr. Black did not welcome the recess decision of Cabinet to cease work on the Midland railway, and no doubt more will be heard from him on this subject before the session ends. It is understood also that apart from his view of the fin-ancial-proposals of the Government now before the House, and his declaration that he would oppose tho second reading of the Finance Bill, Mr. Black considered that individual members of the party should have been consulted before the Prime Minister made his Press announcement in the matter. ALTERED STATE OF PARTIES. The state of the parties, as a result of Mr. Black's defection, is now as follows: — United ~5 Reform ~' Labour 20 Independents " Country Party 1 The Independent members are: Mr. Speaker (the Hon. Sir Charles Statham), Mr. J. S. Fletcher (Grey Lynn), Mr. W. J. Poison (Stratford), Mr. C. A. Wilkinson (Egmont), Mr. J. I. Hogan (Rangitikei), Mr. W. D. Lysnar (Gisborne), and Mr. G. C. Black (Motueka). "EXCOMMUNICATED." The rift in the party lute was mentioned- by Mr. P. Fraser (Labour, Wellington Central) in the early hours of this morning, when referring to the fact that Mr. Black was one of those who voted against the United Party on the Prime Minister's motion for urgency. "He is not a member now," uitei^eetcd a Reform member. Mr. R. Semple (Labour, Wellington East): "He has been excommunicated." Mr. Fraser: "I have no official knowlodge as to whether ho is still a member of the United Party or not. He backed up his opinions and voted for them. I have no official knowledge of what has happened. I expect we will find it in the Press." Mr. Black had taken up au independent stand after severing his connection, or being severed from his connection with the United Party. In the opinion, of Mr. Fraser the incident was a continuation of the disintegration of the United Party. '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19310321.2.68

Bibliographic details

EXPELLED BY PARTY, Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 68, 21 March 1931

Word Count
863

EXPELLED BY PARTY Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 68, 21 March 1931

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