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IN THE RING

Sir "Aeneas"

STILL GOING STRONG TOMMY FAIRHALL EVERGREEN

NEWS AND NOTES

An excellent example of what clean living and steady training will do for a boxer is Tommy Fairhall, still the best welterweight in Australia. Fairhall was considered to be at his best when and shortly after ho was in New Zealand about six years ago. He is Australia's oldest active pugilist, but for all that ho can still more than hold his own with auy contenders for his crown. A shell of his former self, ho outguessed, out-punched, and out-gained tho youthful Wally Hancock at Leichhardt Stadium, and retained his title by an indomitable display of dour courage, a willingness to gamble with punches, a mentality dominating the fight, and an ego standing strong when his physique deserted him (writes Jack Elliott in tho "Referee"). Ho was ripe for the knock-out at least six times during the contest; almost too weary to lift his arms over the last five sessions; but there you arc, he's still the king. Hancock suffered the usual wounds over his eyes, and was handicapped over the last half of tho fight. But if ever he was to be champion again )w had his chance on Friday, for Fairhall was as a child against a few stiff punches after the tenth round. ■ Hancock. opened the fight as in a dream, wound up his left hook in tho second, spilled Fairhall for a short count, gave tho idea that the fight would be short, sensational, and a new champion crowned, and entered into slogging duels, with determination. Knock-out laden swings missed their targets by hairbreadths; Hancock put in some pretty work with short punches in the third, dropped Fairhall for a "no count" in the fifth, and thea did much as Fairhall told him to for the rest of tho fight. Without doing much himself, Fairhall played his man as an angler plays a fish, had the best of tho too-to-too work by shorter and more accurate volleys, and slowly added to his pile of points. Why a boy as strong and as fast as Hancock should run away is hard to understand! But ho back-pedalled froni tho first touch of leather—and ho simply can't fight running backwards. Hancock's left eyebrow was gashed early in tho fight, and when his right followed suit after a collision of heads in the ninth, they might just as well have stopped tho contest. ■ With dangerous wounds over his eyes pouring blood, ho fought like a broken-hearted pup. But, just as the fans were howling to the referee to stop the fight in the eleventh, he staggered Fairhall with a, left hook, and had him ready to bo pushed over. But, by the saints of the game, he stayed away a while liko an hypnotised rabbit before a snake, while his supporters raised their arms and voices to the heavens—and the champion cleared his punch-fogged head, and went in fighting again. The gods gave him yet another chance in the thirteenth. He .pipped Fairhall witli two lefts on the jaw, saw the old 'un sag at the knees, went in open with another punch, and landed his face on a right hook. But why go on with it? Fairhall's condition had left him, and he was positively doddering in his work, but that was good enough. Hancock refused to attack when a punch or two would have won him the crown, and the veteran ran put an easy winner on points. Tho champion should be easy for Jack Carroll —whom Fairhall is ready to fight at tho drop of tho glove—but it'll always bo the same story with Hancock —Fairhall has him bluffed. Palmer and Haines. Undoubtedly tho boxing event of the week was tho fight between Jack Haines and Ambrose (Tiger) Palmer for tho middleweight championship of Australia. The result proved at least that Palmer is no flash in tho pan, and Australia is indeed lucky to possess two such class middlcweights at a time when the game is in need of a fillip. While Haines's riso was rapid enough Palmer's career has been even more meteoric, and tho brilliant way in which he rose to tho occasion when the- opportunity in the form of a fight with Haines offered stamped him with tho hallmark of a class boxer. As is well known, tho Palmers are a fight-1 ing family, and Ambrose's elder brother, Dave, is well known ia New Zealand. With Stadiums, Ltd., making arrangements for the importation of some good middle weights this season, including- Ace Hudkins, a prominent world's championship contender, tho game in Australia should once again boom. Enthusiasts will then get a chance to see just how good Haines and Palmer" really are, and on present indications there seems to be no reason to believe otherwise than that tho two local, boys will give a good account of themselves. At least they havo the I right spirit, as was evidenced by the manner in which both stood up to heavy punishment last Saturday night. Singer and Mandell. Negotiations are under way for another match between Al Singer, world's lightweight champion, and the man he won the title from a few weeks ago, Sammy Mandell. The match will be at catchweights, and decided at Chicago (U.S.A.). ° La Salle Going Strong. "Bad Boy" Bobby La Salle, who fought Charly Purely in Australia last year, is going strong in California. He is a drawcard, owing to his unorthodox fighting—as Australian fans will remember—and last month, at Hollywood, knocked out Bobby Reister in the second round. Open Air Wrestling. To-day in Auckland tho New Zealand Wrestling Association is staging an open air bout between George Kotsonaros and Loin Lurich. The venue is Alexandra Park, Epsom, where the ring is set up on the lawn in front of the big stand. The stand, it is considered, will provide seating accommodation for 14,000 people, while special ringside accommodation is also provided. There havo been many suggestions that an open-air match should be staged in Wellington this season, one of tho keenest advocates being tho Turkish matm.in, Kara Pasha. The Turk considers that a good match in tho open would bo a great draw, mid ho brushes aside the fear of bad weather by stating that ho would bo prepared to wrestle in tho rain, and ho considers any other professional wrestler would bo willing to do likewise. To-day's Auckland bout is not the first- open-air wrestling match to bo staged in New Zealand, as tho Hawkes Bay Association pioneered the event in 1924. Mr. IV. 35. Grant, treasurer of Now Zealand Wrestling Association, was responsible for the promotion of tho Hastings match, which had for the- principals the famous Ike Robin and Walter Miller. Miller was holder of tho light-heavy-weight title of the world .it Ui<time, The bout finished iv the sixth

round, following a-movement by Bobin which to-day would havo been called a slam. It attracted an attendances of something like- 12,000 people, among whom was tho then Governor-General, Sir Charles Fcrgusson. Local Wrestling. The return wrestling match between Kara Pasha and Abio Coleman in tho Town Hall on Monday night, if it approaches tho standard set by the original encounter, will be one of tho most interesting seen here this ssason. As a result of Coleman's display ngainst Alley in Auckland, butting with tho head has bern barred by the Dominion Union, but this should not make Coleman any I; he- less effective as his real flying tackle is likely to cause any .v-'iovnt of trouble. On the following J'cnclay the local association has arranged a match between the popular Tom Bay and the youthful Logan. Dunqdin Items. As mentioned from time to time (states "The Post's" Dunedin correspondent), efforts have been made to revive the interproviucial competition for tho Wairarapa Boxing Shield between Otago and Canterbury, efforts which havo at last been crowned with success. The Christchurch Sports Club is to stag© 'the first tournament that has been held between Otago and Canterbury for a long time on 2nd December, and a pretty strong Otago team has been selected to do battle on that occasion. The big attraction in the Otago team will bo Bert Lowe, New Zealand amateur welter-weight champion, who has such a long string of knock-outs to his credit, and who is a cool, calculating lighter. Ho is regarded as one of tho most promising boys in the Dominion at the present time, and he- should certainly create a good impression in the Cathedral City. Glasson's Modesty. Charlie Glasson, Victorian featherweight, hiis no small opinion of himself (states "The Post's" Dunedin correspondent). He is offering his services to the Otago Boxing Association for a maximum purse of £300. Glasson certainly beat Johnny Leckie at Wanganui a couple of years back, but he has done very little since then, and for any contest ho engaged in in Australia at tho present time Glasson would not get £100. Stadiums certainly did not consider him a big enough draw to match with Johnny Leckie when Leckie was in Australia. Lew Edwards Arrives. Low Edwards, the nineteen-year-old Melbourne feather-weight, arrived in Wellington on Tuesday in order to fulfil a .contract for two matches in New Zealand. Although it had been stated that Edwards was to meet Donovan in Now Plymouth on 15th November no notification had been received of his coming, and his appearance was somewhat unexpected. Edwards will now fulfil tho New Plymouth engagement, Ills second opponent probably being Leckie. The Eight Move. In search of fresh boxing talent, preferably featherweights and welterweights, Mr. Earl Stewart left for San Francisco on Tuesday. A step such as this has been advocated for some time, and tho "Wellington Boxing Association, which has taken the initiative in. sending such a capable judge as Mr. Stewart, is to bo congratulated on its enterprise. It is anticipated that the first boxers which Mr. Stewart has power to engage will arrive early in tho New Year, and with their arrival the game in this country should once again flourish. . While on the Pacific Coast, Mr. Stewart intends to make a close study of the amateur boxers with a view to getting a lino on the prospects of a team of New Zealand amateurs for tho Olympic Games, which are to be held in Los Angeles in 1932. If, in Mr. Stewart's opinion, New Zealand boys could hold their own with those he sees in action, then it is safe to say that a New Zealand team would perform with credit at the Games, for the standard of amateur boxing on the Pacific Coast is notably.the highest in America.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19301108.2.157

Bibliographic details

IN THE RING, Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 112, 8 November 1930

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1,778

IN THE RING Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 112, 8 November 1930

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