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THE DERBY

EPSOM DOWNS OUTING

UNEXPECTED VICTORY

STOEY OF THE EACE

(From "The Post's" Representative.) LONDON, sth June.

People were warned to take their urn lirellas and mackintoshes to £he Derby. It was even suggested that rugs would bo needed. As is the case with racing and the weather, tho unexpected happened. ', When the first buses and motor-cars began to arrivo on Epsom Downs there was a rather thick haze over the grounds. It was not possible to tell in the early morning what this portended. Later, it was realised that it was a heat mist. It gradually cleared, and the air ■became warm. By 2 o'clock in the a£terno — people were surprised to find they •. ore enjoying one. of th^e finest days wo have had this summer, ■ For those who had never been to the Derby before this was most fortunate. As usual, the New Zealand party was arranged by Captain P. C. Pirani. About 140 started from town at about 8.30, in six omnibuses, each having an inside seat and a seat on top. Thus, they were prepared for all emergencies. As was the case,last year, they had an excellent camping ground inside tho course on the rising ground towards Tattenhaiii Corner. The whole of the straight was clearly visible from the tops of the bus.es, though, of course, it was not possible to see clearly the finals of the races. They had had a very enjoyable journey from town, and they had plenty .of time to wander round and see the strange sights of this national picnic. Then, after a good lunch served on the buses, they were prepared for the day's

racing. Another party of New Zealanders were the delegates who are attending the Empire Press Conference. They went down by train to Epsom and walked to the Downs, where they had places on what are known as the St. Bunstan buses. These were in a line on the outside of the straight. Further in the background was a huge marquee set in a grassy enclosure. Lunch was served in the marquee and tea at tables in the | open. Thus, the Press delegates spent their Derby outing as pleasantly as any section of the people on the grounds. Some of them, purely out of sentiment for a New Zealand town, backed Blenheim, and the result was very gratifying to those lucky people. THE PEOPLE'S PICNIC. It is all very wonderful how the people sort themselves. Down in the hollow on tho inside of the course and near the winning post the crowd is thick and uncomfortable. But here arc all those activities which seem to have a strong attraction. There are scores of' booths selling shellfish and other food which seems appropriate to the occasion. There are coconut shies; there is a merry-go-round, a tower with a shoot down which one may slide, and a number of other thrill machines. Here, too, is where the members of the "old firms" ply their trade. Uncle Joe, Ted Cross, Clem. Bamsay, Len Tucker, Bob Brown, and Ernie Crump, and dozens of others whose names are familiar to the investors of modest means storm the people's ears with their "odds." Tipsters provide an interesting human study. Each ono shouts his own praises in an' aggressive raucous voice. He recounts his vivid career as if he were pleading for his life. What a wonderful list of winners he has steered to victory! What a wealth of friends he has whose forecast of the winners is infallible! But who marked his card for the Derby winner he dare not say. One is made to feel that his audience would gasp for breath if tho name were divulged. Such is human nature that the money fell in small showers on the man's outspread coat as he distributed liis sealed envelopes. Miniature rifle ranges tnd a dozen other catch-penny machine*! are there to tempt the aimless public. There are tents with something inside to attract the curious. One booth advertised a cabaret called "Life as Seen iv a West End Night Club." Outside a man shouted "Come and see tho Naughty Girl from Gay Paree." There is the Tattooed Woman with "Eulo Britannia" on her left arm, a Japanese gentleman on her right1, on her chest the Mexican eagle and a Bed Indian, and on her back England and America united. And there were -;"Hairy Mary" and the "Pattest Girl on Earth." RACING TAKEN SERIOUSLY. As an outer fringe to this mass of humanity, and higher up on the Downs, are the thousands of motor-cars which serve their owners and friends as grandstands. Each party picnics in the ear or on the grass beside it. Then, on the outside of the straight, from Tattenham Corner to the grandstands, are ordered rows of motor coaches and red buses ranged as if by a sergeant-major. So one comes to tho temporary grandstands where people liavo ,paid substantially for their seats. The comfort of a seat and the satisfaction of seeing the last part of the race is hardly compensated for h, ho restriction of movement throughout a long day. The more privileged ■ ones have tho comfort of the permanent grandstand, and those most privileged of all have entrance to tho ' paddock between the races. Here may be seen the King and Queen, the Princes, and scores of those whose ' names are known, throughout the wholo Empire. The biggest cheer of tho day came half an hour beforo tho first race, when the King and Queen came to tho front of the Eoyal Box. Those near at hand when His Majesty arrived saw how exceedingly well ho looked, and those at a. distance, on the other side of the coiir&e, were delighted when ho waved his arms to them in a comprehensive friendly greeting. THE RACE DESCRIBED. As for tho great mco itself: Tho first horse to show in fv-mt as the ascent of the hill from 'v*. start was made was the favouriU.. Sir Hugo Hirst's Diolite. Ho was followed by Rustorrt Pasha (Aga Khan), with the Irish horse, BaUyfcris. Trews (Lord Astor), and Silver Flare Mr. Conrtauld), the most prominent of tho others. Beforo reaching the top ( of tho MA Bay had followcl R;:stom y'asha to go !nto tho lead v.v.f •'.:(• t!io rails. DU lv-e, however, re:v: i i-lose up to him, tad at 'i>e br.gi-'iu.rg of C'hc descent to Tattenhain Corner and Mie straight was never more than a le:i ;th behind him. Ballyferis, Silver F :re, and Trews also kept their places, but by the time that half the descent had been covered Iliad (the second Manton string) was close up with thorn, while Blenheim the Aga Khan's second string), beautifully ridden by Wragg, who had never hastened his mount, was also by now within striking distance of the leaders.

A moment later the field swung into the straight, and in full view of those on the tops of the omnibuses and the masses on the stands. Kustom Pasha was still in front, on the rails, with DioHte on his off-side not a length behind. Here were the first and second favourites in the lead and less than five furlongs to go. Surely, thought most people, One or the other would win; but scarcely had the straight been reached

before Enstom Pasha showed that ho "had inherited the speed of his dam \vithout f le stami? a of his "lire, and <ie began to fade aw/,j\ He vas quickly out of the race, and Diolite was left in front.

Ballyferis, Trews, and Silver Flare kept on their way, but they could not quicken, and wore passed by Iliad, who at oaco moved up to Diolite. For a moment Diolite held him, and it scorned at last that a favourite would win tlio greatest of all races, but suddenly Bay, his rider, showed signs of anxiety, and Iliad not only held him, but began to draw away. It was now the turn of many people to believe that the Manton "neglected" would win, for Trews was a better favourite than Iliad, when suddenly it was seen that Blenheim, who from Tottenham Corner had been within striking distanco of the leaders, was coming with a fine run on the outside. Ho never faltered, Wragg a^ ways having him perfectly balanced, and surely, if slowly, he caught Iliad and went on to win by a length. Diolito stayed on well to finish third. THE AGA KHAN'S DELIGHT. There may have been a faint cheer as Blenheim was passing the post, but for the moment the feelings of the crowd were suppressed by the sheer shock of realising that the "wrong one" in the Aga Khan's colours had won. Yet there were some who could remember to cheer home the effort of a game colt, and the fine judgment of his jockey, Harry Wragg. And when the Aga Khan immediately left the little stand which is adjacent to the winning post and walked, all smiles, down the course to meet and lead in his winner, he received an ovation which was renewed when horse and proud owner passed in through the gate to the saddling enclosure. Very soon afterwards tho Aga Khan was called to receive the, personal congratulations of the- King. The Aga Khan's delight at the biggest Turf triumph was spontaneous and unmasked. He laughed with pleasure as one after another famous racing men and society people wrung his hand in congratulations. "It is a wonderful day for me," he said. "It only shows how wrong was the form in the Guineas. It may seera curious, but my two horses have never run together before. They have been owned by two different owners and come from different stables. Blenheim has proved himself a wonder. It was a fine race in every way, and —well, Blenheim is a splendid fellow. I did rot have a bob on either horse. I made no bet. As for celebrations, well, I hope to celebrate in a quiet way. I shall not. do anything spectacular, but a win of this sort, in the finest racing country, deserves something to mark it." Blenheim performed with conspicuous success throughout last season, winning four of his seven races, and finishing second in the other three. His successes, included the New Stakes at Ascot. At his first outing he wjpn the Manton Place at Newbury from Spring Maiden filly and Needle Eock colt (Diolite), with a huge field behind. In the Sandown Stud Produce Stakes he was beaten by Bridge of Bath filly. He won the Speedy Plate at Windsor, and in the New Stakes beat Press Gang, the favourite. He won the Hopeful Stakes at Newmarket in easy fashion, and was second in the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster. In the "Guineas" he ran fourth, a position occupied by Papyrus in his year who went on to win the Derby. * JOCKEY'S STORY. Wragg, the winning jockey, thus tells his story of the race: "I was drawn on the extreme outside but one, and when the starter pulled the lever I would be standing about a length behind. That would not have mattered much, but my horse jumped off "to the right instead of straight forward, with the result that I was last of all to leave the gate and a few lengths behind the others. I at once took a firm grip of his hea,d, for I did not want him to jump into his bit. Once I had him balanced I lot him go along on the outside of tho field, and I got him running very smoothly but well within himself. "By the time we had got to the rnilo and a quarter starting-post I found I had moved up a few places and I continued to,go on tho outside, for I wanted to steer'clear of trouble. At the mile post, still going on the bit,,l was about seventh. There were three horses racing almost abreast, and then another, three in somewhat similar formation. Just behind thoso two groups was Steve Donoghue, so I pulled in a bit with only Steve botween the rails and myself. Having got there without trouble, I was quite satisfied. It was just the pitch I wanted and I sat quite still. "Noble Star was now racing on my outside, but there was no danger of my getting shut in. Thus we raced to Tattonham Corner. There were then in front of me Eustom Pasha, Diolite, Ballyferis, Trews, and Iliad. Onco we had go into the straight Ballyferis and Trews seemed to collide, and they dropped out. I once more pulled to the outside, and for a moment I was inclined to make my effort. But I saw Bobby Jones get out his whip and dash after the two leaders, and I realised that if I did the samo my horse might not last it to the end. So I promptly changed my mind and went in behind Iliad again. When I saw Jones go and make his effort I was not alarmed, for I felt I could go and beat him when. I wanted. He soon overcame Diolite, and that was the signal for me to got really busy. It was not moro than a furlong and a half from the winning post when I pulled out and went after Iliad. HORSE'S SHARE OF CREDIT. "There was nothing spectacular about the way Blenheim did his job. It wa3 only by a very gradual process that I made up the leeway. .Strido_ by stride I crept nearer, but all the time I knew I was going to win. I had to bring out my whip and help the game colt as much as I could, but he had a bit better speed than Iliad, and when I got on terms a hundred yards from homo the race was mine. I had taken a look over my shoulder before making my final burst, and that satisfied me I had only Iliad to beat. I was going right away from him in the last fifty yards to win by a clear margin. "I have to give Blenheim his share of the credit. He is a lovely littlo horse to ride. I found I could put him just where I wanted, and he did everything I asked him in the most gentlemanly manner. I thought ho would gut the trip. He did." Blenheim was not broil by the Aga Khan. Ho was one of tho many highpriced yearlings purchased on his behalf, the price paid to Lord Carnarvon, the breeder, at auction being 4100 guineas. Hf is by Blandford (8) from Mnlva (*), by Charles O'Mallcy1 from Wild Aruso, an owi> sister to the Ascot Makes aii-ts Alexandra Plate winner iiivoli, by Eobert lo Diablo out of Mavliacua, a mare that was a half-sister to tho Doncastrv Cup winner Bronzino. Among the New Zealandcrs who booked scats for themselves and their friends with Captain Pirani wore; The Hon. T. S. Weston, Mr. W. A. lorns, Miss Pharazyn, Mr. B. Tripp, Mr. Bison, 'Miss Lyttelton, Mr. Nixon, Mrs. F. C. Fryer (Hastings), Mr. H. Hansen (Wellington), Miss J. Aiken (Cbristchurch), Mr. A. C Fry (Wellington), Mr. W. E. A. Gill (Wellington), Mrs. H. Pegler and Mrs. E M. Page (Auckland), Mr. E. J. Mulligan (Ashburton), Mr. G. L. Bannatyne (Auckland), Mr. S. J. Harbutt (Auckland).

Such of ihe cable news on thin paso ,ia la so headed liaa appeared in "Tlio Times" and is cabled to Australia and New Zealand by special permission. It snould be understood that tho opinions aro not thoso oE "The Times" unless eipiessly stated to bo so.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19300712.2.53

Bibliographic details

THE DERBY, Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 11, 12 July 1930

Word Count
2,611

THE DERBY Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 11, 12 July 1930

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