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NOTES AND COMMENTS

'{BY "VSDETTS.*'}

: RACING FIXTURES. Mnrcli 7, S.—Napier Park R.CMarch 7, B.—Cromwell J.C. March B.—Franklin R.C. Murch 15, 17.—Wellington R.C. March 15, 17.—Ohinemurl J.C. Jlarch 17.—Opunakd K.C. Jlarch 20 Waimate R.C. March 22 —Bay of Plenty J.C. March 22, 24.—Oamaru J.C. March 26.—Opotlkl J.C. March 26, 27.—Manawatti R.C. April 3, s.—Whangarel R.C. April 3, s.—South Canterbury -J.C. April 4, s.—Masterton R.C. April 11, 12.—Hawkes Bay J.C. April 11, 12.—Otautau R.C. April 12.—Hororata R.C. April 12, 14.—Westport J.C. April 12, 14.—Walkato R.C. April 19.—Tuapeka County J.C. April 19, 21.—Wairarapa K.C. April 19. 21.—Feilding J.C. April 19, 21.—Auckland R.C. April 19, 21, 22.—Rlverton B.C. April 21.—Beaumont R.C. ' April 21.—Waipukurau J.C. April 21 Kumara R.C. April 21, 22.—Canterbury J.C. April 23, 24.—Westland R.C. , April 26, 28.—Greymouth J.C. April 36, 30.—Avondale J.C. April 30.—Xeefton J.C. ' , XBOTTING PIXTTJBES. March B.—Timaru T.C -■'■■■.'■' March 11—Manawatu T.C. March 15—New Brighton T.C. March 15. 17.—HawUes Bay T.C. March. .17 18.—Nelson T.G - March 22.—Wellington T.C. March 24.—South Oiago T.C. March 29.—Thames T.G March 29.—Cheviot T.C. April s.—Marlborough T.G April B.—Walkato T.G April 10, 12.-Wanganul T.C. - April 19. 23.—NZ Metropolitan T.C. April 19, 21.—Hawera T.G April 26.-—TaranaM T.C. April 26.—A3hbmton T.G

Reminders. The Autumn Meeting o£ the Maiiawatu Kacing Club is one of the popular fixtures o£ the year. With three classic races on the two days, it is particularly superior in class.' First forfeits for two of these ; events, the Sires' Produce Stakes and. 'Manawatu Stakes, are due on Friday, at 9 p m., when general nominations are also, due. In addition to the handicap events the entry is also due for the Awapum Gold Cup. run on; the opening day: this is a mile and „ quarter weight-for-age event, carrying a stake of £600, including a gold cup of the value of £100. Juveniles at Trentham. 'From the weights allotted by Mr. H. Coyle for the Plunket Nursery Handicap, to be decided at Trentham on the opening day of the coming meeting, it is evident he has formed a good opinion of Tripping and Autopay. Both of these youngsters have come into prominence only recently with two.successes. Applcdore even more has. caught the handicapper's, eye, for he has yet to win, yet is within a few pounds of winners of two races, and has to give weight to winners in Green Linnet, Henry of Navarre, and Jenny Diver. There is not much doubt that Appledore is an improving gelding of whom the.best has yet to be seen, and the handicapper's tip may prove a good one to bear in mind. Penalties at Trentham. ""As a number of horses with engagements at Trentham will be racing this week it is as well to note that only win : ners engaged in hack races earn a penalty. The conditions read: In races under hack conditions the winner of any race after the declaration of weights shall. carry a 51b penalty,. of two or more races a 101b penalty. In the case of a winner of any race at this mectin_ starting again on the same:day, it shall carry a 71b penalty. No penalty to-be incurred in opeu events for, wins in races subject to hack conditions. How Amounis Won the Futurity. Aniounis' cemented his title to enduringfame by capturing the Ciiuliield Futurity,Stakes.■" Since its establishment in 1898. the race had never previously been won so amazingly, says a Sydney ! exchange.: Amounis .was second last of a strung-out field after going two furlongs. He made. Tip no .leeway in the succeeding furlong, and spectators dismissed him. from their; calculations, shifting their gaze to the" struggle between Figure,' Greenline, and the lightly-weighted First Arrow. In thrilling style Figure had dashed to the. front,, and Greenline did not gain her. measure until the judge's box loomed near.; J. Pike was as near being thunderstruck as-i$ possible to a jockey of his tempera-:: raent when he found old Amounis sweep; ing: past on the outside. Greenline, though flat out, appeared anchored by comparison, and Amounis scored magnificently by a length, Greenline being a neck in ad-, vauce of Figure. Onlookers burst into, frantic cheering before the numbers went np, realising that they had witnessed _ an, epic achievement. Few had caught sight* of-Amounis. until he was half-way' down the straight.. .It is safe to say that the' Magpie.gelding covered the.last two furlongs at an unprecedented speed. Harold»lones got the winning mount through Pike being claimed for Greenlihe; obeying Frank M'Grath's instructions, he sat motionless on Amounis until the home' stretch was reached. Cessation of rain in the early hours of Saturday morning enabled the track to dry up. wonderfully. Had the weather remained wet, or: even if the race had been run at Flemington, whicli recovers slowly frqm a soaking, Amounis might'as well have been left in his stabler ■ A.New Zealand Buyer.'..'. ■ G. Paul, who sold Aussie and Papat'u in, Sydney last spring, went across to the sale of W. Tiridall's horses last.week, and purchased three lots. The horses were sold because of the disqualification of Tindall for twelve months. Paul's purl chases were Trishna, King's Knave, and Shangar. Trishna, who is a four-year-old chestnut gelding by Seremond from the Clanranald mare Mallaig, cost 400 guineas. King's Knave, a two-year-old black gelding by. Comedy King from Eumilia, cosjt 60 guineas," and Shangar, a brown gelding by Moabite from, the Tressady mare Lala->----gnli, cost 450 guineas. . In all twenty-three horses were sold for a total of 7055 guineas." Franklin, a two-ycar-old gelding by Packwood from Serinette, made top price at 650 guineas. . Values Compared. :, The sale'of'W. Tindall's horses in Sydney last week gave an-opportunity of the comparison, of the value placed on his two-year-olds with their cost at the yearling hliies.. ■ Franklin, who was a winner, cost 300 guineas, and .650 guineas was secured for him. Sagacity appreciated from 175 guineas to 475 guineas, although.yet untried, aud Social News from 500 guineas to 600 guineas. On the other hand, Shamgar, who cost COO guineas, went for 450 guineas. Altogether, however, the owner-' trainer must consider himself fortunate with the sale, especially as he had a bad beginning. Particulars of 11 youngsters are available.. ' For Pytheus, who cost 35 guineas, he received a like amount. The Cathamine filly, who cost 100 - guineas, went for 30 guineas less, but a greater drop in value was apparent "in the case of Woodwake, for whom 200 guineas was paid and GO guineas was rpceived. For Sir Daniel 100 guineas was refused. He cost 300 guineas at the Easter sales, but 60 guineas was accepted for King's Knave, although he cost 200 guineas as a yearling. Bass Viol, was secured by the owner for 200 guineas, and ■was sold for 375 guineas, but Caique, who cost 300 guineas,, went for 50 guineas less than cost. For Sericus, who cost 200 guineas, 325 guineas was re- • fused, but Barcone, who cost 550 guineas, could have been secured for about 200 guineas less, although the best offer was 100 guineas. Buyers of yearlings are under heavy expense from the time they malfe their purchases. Breaking-in fees, PTftdocking, and freight charges add consii erably t»: the cap'ial outlaf, but is souring 324t5 guineas for two-year-olds who cost in the aggregate 2710 guineas TindaJJ did reasonably well. Vallar Gone to Sydney. ' Vallar, who has been something of a' ■ disappointment this season at northern' mcetings.a'rrived in Sydney last week and was taken to the stables of F. Williams. Vallar is only a five-year-old and should have, every, chance to strike his real form in;' Australia." The Totalisatpr in Victoria. Apparently the totalisaior in Victoria is not going to be so pronounced a success or certain of popularity, if it is introduced. The "Australasian," which it

can be presumed speaks the mind of the chairman of the Victorian Racing Club. says: Numerous attempts liuvc been made to establish the totalisator in Victoria, The advocates o£ the machine form of betting have not been discouraged by the frequent rebuffs. With a persistency worthy of a better cause they arc about to make another attempt to increase the already, too numerous facilities for betting. The last Totalisator Bill was defeated overwhelmingly in the Legislative Council, and nothing has happened since to lustily Parliament reversing its decision. ice excuse now put forward is that the Government is in need of raony, and that taxation through the totalisator would provide a portion of it, ami at the same time obviate the need for imposing lurther direct taxation on the community. Whether it would achieve in Victoria the object-its sponsors have in view can be conjectured: only. The totalisator was introduced into New South Wales tor taxation purposes, but as a revenue producer it has not nearly realised expectations.' The percentage taken from the pool to'meet the requirements of the Government and. the racing clubs is far too high', and the machine is not able to compete'successfully against the bookmakers. Some-of the racing clubs, particularly, those in the country, would be glad- to be rid of the totalisator, which in. many instances has proved a burden rather than''-a blessing. National Horses in England. One of the most interesting events has bcc-i the reappearance of Easter Hero, one of the most brilliant, and at the same time one of the most notorious, steeplechasers in the country, states an English writer early in January. Easter Hero won the Penkridge Steeplechase at Wolverhamp'ton at practically the same time that his one-time owner (Mr. Frank Barbour) was signing the 'notice of sale of all his horses preliminary to his retirement from active participation in tnri affairs. Mr. Barbour bought Easter Hero, for less than £101)0. Ho was \one of several/horses, in Mr. Barbour's ownership which carried all before them two season's ago.' It was in March, 1928, that the late Mr. Loewenstein—the Belgian financier who was killed by falling from an aeroplane travelling from England to Franeer:desii;ed a horse possessed of a good, chaiicie.ih the Grand National to carry his''colours. "Mr. Barbour was asked to place aprice ori' Easter Hero. He was paid ! about £7000,'and'there was a big contingency, said to be £3000, in the event of the: horse winning the1 Grand National. Easter Hero carried Mr. Loewenstein's colours in the race, and I recall the fact that he was the cause of much havoc to others, when he ran across the dangerous canal turn fence and finally straddled it. AfteS Mr..- Loewenstein's death Easter Hjsto' was bought on behalf of the American^ Mr. J.H. Whitney, in whoso possession ■iie.'is' to-day. '".".■. !Jloko, a great 'chaser, was another of Mi\ Barbour's big sales. Pew men in horse dealing on a large scale can have the luck to know just when to buy aud when to sell. ■:. Mr.. Barbour seems to have^been inspired, that way, for Koko had touched the' top class with an apparently big chance for the National of 1029 when, on the eve bf the race, his owner received an offer from the Hon. F. E. Guest and Mr. A. Grisar that he could not refuse. From that moment Koko never did any good. Easter Hero is to try again over the Grand •National course iv March, and in his race at Wolverhampton he certainly showed all his old form and jumped well. Dearth of Stayers. ■ The English authority, "Warren Hill,", in looking round for the, reason for the 'paucity of stayers, blames the executives of racing clubs, who provide so many good iprizcs .■ for short distance, two-year-old •events. : He, points . out, ; that breeders ■eannoi be blamed'-for catering for an ob-; jvious-;"demand for', early _ He 'adds:-,"Who can ,say such procedure is in keeping, with the promotion of the improvement of British blood stock? Surely is need for a drastic overhaul of the 'pn ent-day t programmes with a view to 'discouraging the exploitation of juveniles so immature, and to ;en courage owners to iadopt patience-, with the promise of due reward.;' Once;the stakes are reduced for itwo-year-'old .\ events and correspondingly liaised; for races decided over a, mile and 'upwards.-, for . three-year-olds aud. 'horses, -the demand would greatly be,in: iftueuced ,-in. the right direction, ■ with breeders acting accordingly. Although the British; thoroughbred remains pre-eminen t in the world, I am convinced that some 'retrogression has set in. This is mainly' 'because' of the great tax of endurance ,place'ds'ripon''. immature animals, /which :take"s such a big toll of each'individual's nervous energy as to render it neurotic. I do not wish to infer by that statement thati'iwe'; are' in danger of losing our con,trol -inf;; the bloodstock markets of the |worlcti-,yet I fear it is true to say that we Jare inclined to lose the status we once ;hcldj- and arc certainly not pursuing the line of progression." These remarks by an Englishman regarding English racing can just as: fittingly be applied to Australian and New Zealand racing. ■Tattenham Corner. Of 'all well-known names of particular points, on English racecourses, such as the "dip" and the "bushes" at Newmarket, and the canal turn on the Grand National course at Aintree, the most widely known is Tattenham Corner, on the Derby course at Epsom. In a recent issue of "Horse and Hound" particulars are given of the derivation of this name. It is as follows: "From- old documents it appears' that, about the -time of the Stuarts, a member of the Tottenham family .bought a tract of land in .the parish of Banstead, which remained; in'"-the possession of the family for 'niany'years, and which came to a point at the.ispot where the present five furlongs' coursejoins the Derby course, iibutting'on the ioad from Epsom to Walton. ..The comer at,the point of this land became known' as Tottenham's Corner, which was corrupted to Tattenham Corner. It- is thus incoiTect to write or speak o£ the horse's coming around Tattenham Corner, as the corner is on the opposite side of the course." Condition of Tidal. Tidal, the French horse, who formerly raced in New Zealand, and who' broke down when competing in' Tattersall's Spring Handicap at Randwick in September last, has recently been doing nice work on the training tracks, and it is now believed that there is a good chance of his standing up to a Cup preparation. At the time he went lame it was thought that Tidal was suffering from a bruised heel. In a few days' time, however, the trouble was found to be deep-seated, and Tidal was kept moving on the tracks as a last hope of saving him from permanent sesamoid trouble. Though Tidal did not manage to run .into a place in the Metropolitan,, he shaped well enough to lend colour to" the opinion that he would have been difficult to beat but for his ailment. Now he seems sound, and he may yet train on and score in one of the good long-distance handicaps. Well Bred Mares for New Zealand. Purchases at the Woorilim Stud disPl ;l "sale held, in Australia recently included two well-bred brood mares for the Dominion. These were After Glow, an English mare by Sunstar—Marie Legraye with'a filly foal by Spearhead and served by the same sire; and King Cup, also imported, -being by Amadis from Flower jug, by Florizel 11. from a sister to Sundridge, the sire of Absurd.

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NOTES AND COMMENTS, Evening Post, Volume CIX, Issue 54, 5 March 1930

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NOTES AND COMMENTS Evening Post, Volume CIX, Issue 54, 5 March 1930

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