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DEATH OF COLARADO

'SIRE"OF PROMISE

(From "The Post's" Representative.) LONDON, 20th. September. Lord Derby has had the misfortune to lose his six-year-old stallion Colorado (Phalaris—Canyon). The horse died at the Knowsley Stud, near Liverpool, and a post-mortem will be made to find the cause. He had been suffering from some internal trouble which was difficult to diagnose. The value of the horse was probably £30,000. He was one of the most promising of young stallions, and one of the best sons of Phalaris. He won in stakes £30,358. As a two-year-old he won the Coventry Stakes at Ascot, but Colorado's racing career was chiefly notable for his meetings with Coronach. The former easily^ won the Two Thousand Guineas from Lord Woolavington's colt, and as a consequence started a hot favourite for the subsequent Derby, in"which, he could finish only third to Coronach'and Lancegaye. As a four-year-old, howevei', Colorado took a spacious revenge upon his Epsom conqueror. In the Princess of Wales' Stakes Colorado defeated his old rival by' a matter of eight lengths, while another victory -in the Eclipse Stakes was equally convincing. He retired after being beaten in the Champion Stakes in the autumn of the same year. He had been at the stud a couple of seasons, and his first produce are regarded as particularly good. Mumtaz Mahal, the Aga Khan's flying filly, had a very fine colt by him. Colorado's nomination list bad been fully booked for several seasons. "Hotspur" ("Daily Telegraph") writes: Lord Derby had a very genuine affection for Colorado. He loves all his good horses, but perhaps Colorado made an exceptional appeal. In the first place he was a son of a mare, Canyon, that had herself won classic honours on the racecourse. Then, too, there was always something of ,the tragic about him. Only the other day the Hon. George Lambtoii, who trained him so well, was telling me that he had never known a horse perplex him so much. He was. referring to his habit of appearing to choke towards the end of his gallops. This would not always occur, but the point is that no one could foretell when it was going to happen. There seemed to be a rattling in the throat, due to an apparent difficulty to take in a breath, as if his tongue was half choking him. This happened in.the last good gallop he did before the Two Thousand Guineas, and in consequence he was not at all fancied when he went out for that race for which his great rival-to-be, Coronach, was a hot favourite. To the amazement of everyone, certainly to the astonishment of his owner and trainer, he gave a brilliant 'display of galloping, and won by five lengths. Colorado resembled certain other good horses bred by Lord Derby from Phalaris, in the sense that he was not a tall horse in stature. He would best bo described as lengthy and low. His quarters were most powerful, his length of rein most unusual, and he had a beautiful bloodlike head and bold eye. L-liave never wavered in the belief that he would prove a sire right out of the ordinary, for he had everything in his favour —those good looks I have described, remarkably correct breeding on both sides of his pedigree, and exceptional credentials as a racehorse.

Washing the salb off those white ineulators on the telegraph posts sounds like a Labour Government's idea for keeping employment brisk during slack seasons. But in the American State of Utah regular baths are given to insulator cups. Where the lines cross the Salt Lake Desert wind-blown salt cakes on the telephone wires and causes leakages of electricity. So to and fro goes a motor-lorry, towing a queer-looking steam engine supplying steam at 80 lb to 901b pressure from an oil-heated boiler. A halt is called under every pole,- and a hosa held up aloft, attached to a stout fishing rod. Through the nozzle at the tip steam ia then sprayed over each insulator until it is clean.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19291107.2.20

Bibliographic details

DEATH OF COLARADO, Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 112, 7 November 1929

Word Count
672

DEATH OF COLARADO Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 112, 7 November 1929

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