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THE DERBY AT EPSOM'S GREAT RACING CARNIVAL

ground inside the,course at Tattenham Corner. The party could, not hnve been more fortunate. The wonderful panorama of the downs lay below them. A pood part of the course at the back could be seen, and the whole of the running ti-om 'J.altcnham Corner to the finish was plainly visible. With glasses thy colours of the jot-keys could easily lie picked out and the- order of their going followed practically to the finish. It is, indeed, a .wondcrnu picture that forms itself on the Downs on tho morniii" of Derby Day. From their advantu-Tons position the New. Zealanders conkl sou it all. There on the left on the high ground at the back of the course wore the thousands of motor-cars lined up in ordered array, but not no closely packed but that the owners could not picnic comforlably iMirthor down the hill is the tented field. There are thousands who go to Epsom and who see none of the racing. They are there to enjoy the fun of,the-fair, to eat and drink, to throw for coconuts, to enter mysterious tents where alleged wonders arc to be seen, and to entrust their humble shillings to the bookmakers in the hope of gain. • • A WONDERFUL PANORAMA. Then, on the right, outside the' coiirsc ono could see the galleries of packed Humanity—those, who. take their racing more seriously and are willing to p-n----guineas for a seat or for standing room on tho grandstands. They have a view ot the finish'of the'races; they are near' the bookmakers, who would ■ look with contempt on less than a pound, but they miss much of the-fun that Derby Day provides.- And then; Reside the 'grandstands tor the whole distance up to Tat-

iivoid interference. Gay Day .was never going well afterwards. At ' half-way Hunter's Moon, Trigo, and En Garde wore well clear of the others, and halfway down the hill to Tattenham Corner l'.u Garde dropped behind-the other, two It was j then that it looked as though Hunters Moon would win, for on form hi) was a better horse and a better slayer than Tiigo. Marshall, Trigo's joukoy, appears to have been confident at this stage. The pair wore level as they swung into tho straight, and one expected then to SOI! li"."'-cl"s Moon come right away. It was Trigo. however, who drew ahead, and \Vcstou explained afterwards that hereabouts his horse began to feel the clTccl ot raring downhill. Hunter's Moon has rather .straight pasterns, and a horse so formed is at a disadvantage when descending.a hill at full pace;-he is also more inclined than others to feel the jar when the going is firm. END OF THE RACE. Just as they made the turn, Kopi slipped up and Posterity )-ad to jump him, ami Tom Pear tree was interfered with. Then Walter Gay was forced to the outside of the field. Before . the straight was .vouched, Cragadour and Mr. Jinks were holding out distress signals, and a little 'further on Gay Day was done with. Hunter's Moon came on with only a nock lead of Trigo. Rattlin the Keefori En Garde, Horus, and Brienz. The first of these to crack were Rattliu the Reefer and Horus, and then^ BricuK came ou the ! scone. Walter. Gay, racing wide on the right, began-to gain ground. A hundred yards or so .in the line for home, Trigo Headed Hunter's 'Moon, who hung on to his rival well to inside the distance, where

been left somewhat dazed for a moment or two, but he made a rapid recovery, assisted to that end by the knowledge that lie is the half-owner of the latest sire of a Derby winner—Blaudford, bought by him as a yearling from the National Stud lor only 730 guineas, a winner of much distinction himself, and now assuming the crown which is bestowed on every sire of a Derby winner.

it often happens that when fortune comes to some people it comes as an avalanche;. How else can one explain Mr. liarncLt's yrent good luck this season in Kngliiisil? Last autumn he sent over two horses to be trained by Mr. Dawson. One, Athlon!, was a tlnee-year-old; the other, Trigo, ;i two-year-old, that had won the chief two-year-old race at Phoenix Park. Atliford was .111 unlucky loser of the Lincolnshire Handicap. Ho then won the Newbury Cup nnd the Jubilee Handicap. And then comes Trigo to win the greatest of races and to remind us of the invincibility of Irish-bred horses on our racecourses this season. For, in addition to the exploits of Atliford and Trigo, Parwiz wou the City aud Suburban, Gregalach , the Grand National Steeplechase, Mr. Jinks the Two Thousand Guineas, Royal Minstrel the Victoria Cup, Elton the Lincolnshire Handicap, First Flight the Chester Cup, and Poor Man the Manchester Cup. A CHAT WITH THE JOCKEY. Joseph Marshall, the successful jockey, is ;i Brighton lad, aged 20. He has been attached to Mr. Stanley Wootton's stable for the past six years, and is still in his apprenticeship. Owing to the fact that his weight became rather substantial, Mar-

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Bibliographic details

THE DERBY AT EPSOM'S GREAT RACING CARNIVAL, Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 15, 17 July 1929

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THE DERBY AT EPSOM'S GREAT RACING CARNIVAL Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 15, 17 July 1929

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