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THE DERBY

HOW TRIGO WON

A NEW ZEALAND PARTY

(From "The Post's" Representative.)

LONDON, 6th June.

Summer, and sunlight had persisted right up to the day before the Derby. Wednesday morning, -however,, was > leaden and overclouded, and "people took their mackintoshes with them to ;Epsom for the great day's outing.: iThey needed them later on, but the trek from London" in trains, cars, omnibuses, taxi-cabs, motor-cars, and horse vehicles was done .in weather that no one could: criticise. ■ The dust had been laid by showers in the night, and it was cool and pleasant along-the road.

A party of 120: New Zealanders had booked to go. out to Epsom by buses arranged for by Captain P. C. Pirani (New Zealand Travel Bureau), and they assembled at Waterloo -place shortly after S o'clock. Each, one of the party was allotted an'inside'seat-and an outside seat. The journey down' was full of interest for the majority; who had never seen a Derby-before. The first twelve miles, of course, is just-like' any other bus ride in London, but after passing Furley the countryside is very beautiful, so that when the speed slackened because of the stream ot vehicles there were plenty of things to occupy the attention. Eventually the cavalcade of buses carrying the New Zealanders took up a,position on the high

tr-nhain Corner, were the ordered ranks of red London omnibuses, four or five deep, and so accurately in line that it seemed a sergeant-major' had had a band in their arrangement. Outside and beyond were the caravans and tents, of the gipsies who had camped on their traditional ground m spite of the new regulations forbidding them. lfc was a wonderful panorama that was visible from the tops of. the buses at luttenham Corner—a sight in itself worth coming all that way to see, if one had not seen it before. And these million people had all been conveyed on wheels from London and the surrounding country throughout the few hours of the morning—a masterpiece of organisation. A shower of light rain fell about 1 o clock, and then after a bright period the clouds rolled. over again,- and before the great race rain began to fall lightly and steadily. It was really not enough to spoil tho pleasure of the day, • but the sunshine, even with heat and' dust, would have been preferable.

Most of those who looked to win a little money on the Derby v.-ere disappointed. It was essentially a day of rejoicing for the bookmakers. Cragadour, Kdpi, Hunter's Moon, and Gay Day were names which hail been heard for weeks. But Trigo, Walter Gay, and Brienz had made little or no impression on the public mind before the race. HOW THE HORSES RAN. As for the race, the start was a good one, although Kopi, Posterity, and Leonard dwelt. .Kopi -was. the last to leave the gate. Hunter's Moon -had the inside position, and made the best o£-it. At the end of a quarter'of a mile he was racing in front with Trigo ' and .Barbizon. En Garde. Rattlin the Reefer, Roberto, and Gay Day were at their heels,' but they had not gone much farther before Donoghue had to check' Gay Day, evidently to

he resigned second place to first Bricnz and then Walter Gay. The latter put in sumo good strides, but Tricro had too big 1\ t l?. b° really threatened. Though tie Beckhampton-trained colt was fast closing on him, Marshall's mount stuck gallantly to his task, and went home a winner amid very little cheering by a length and a half. Two lengths separated second and third. THE UNPLACED. Hunter's Moon, who ran a good race for a. mile and a quarter, was three lengths away, fourth. En Garde, prominent all the way, was a length and a half off, fifth. 1 ostenty (slow off and interfered with) was three lengths away, sisth. Intervals of necks separated Cragadour, ?. W Vas, seventll > N.P.B. eighth, and Rattlm the Reefer (who ran well for a mile) ninth. After a gap or two'lengths came Le Voleur tenth, Mr, Jinks (lost-his place at the end of six furlongs) was eleventh. .A length and a half off was Tom ieartrce (running on) twelfth, after being balked by the fall of Kopi, Cavendo (ran well) a neck off thirteenth, Aristotle (prominent until half-way up the straight) was roiuteenth. Barbizon. (far from disgraced) fifteenth, Reedsmuuth sixteenth, liorus seventeenth, Reflector eighteenth, Leonard nineteenth, Gay Day (ran ungenerously) was twentieth. The last pair were Roberto and Grand Prince, except Kopi. who came in riderless. Grand Prince was last. Time, 2min 36 3-osec. OWNER OF THE WINNER. Tiigo's owner, Mr. W. Barnett, is said li-i a - lUOst adFlirab! e enthusiast, who delights in breeding his own racehorses. Mr Barnett is a Belfast grain merchant, lie bred his Derby winner. Therein lies half the joy of this great triumph for him. His trainer, Mr. Dawson, may have

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19290717.2.35.4

Bibliographic details

THE DERBY, Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 15, 17 July 1929

Word Count
820

THE DERBY Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 15, 17 July 1929

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