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NOTES AND COMMENTS

(BY "VEDETTE.")

RACING FIXTURES.

April H2, 13—Masterton R.f. April -18. 20 Whanuaret' R.C.. April 10, 20—Hawkes Bay J.C. April »26, .27-Nolson'J.O.-April 27—Amberloy R.C. April; 27. 29-Waikato R.C. May 3, 4—Marlborugh R.C. May 4—Oamaru J.C. ■May 4—rMarton J.C. May 9, 11—Egmont R.C. . May 11—Franklin R.C. ; May 18, 18—Wanganul J.C. May. 25—Ashburton County R.C. June 1, 3—Otaki-Maori R.C. Juna 1, S,'s—Dunedin J.C. ■■ June 1, 3, s—Auckland R.C June .■l2.—Egmont-Wanganui Hunt Club. June . 14, 15--Napier Park R.C. Juno 20, 22—South Canterbury J.C. ■ Juno 21, 22—Hawkes Bay J.C. June 29—Waverley R.C. June 29—Ashburton County R.C. July 10, 11, 13—Wellington R.C. July 25—Walmate District Hunt Club. July.2s, 27—Gisborne R.C. July 27—South Canterbury Hunt Club.

Reminders. , r ■ . 1 Nominations for the Marton Meeting on 4th May close on Tuesday next, at 9 P.m. Nominations for the Marlborough Meeting close on Friday of next week. Acceptances for.tTie Hawkes Bay Meeting -close next Tuesday. Nelson handicaps are due to-morrow. Hack Quality.

.. Even allowing for the fact that Bernera may riot have been quite at his best at Eiccarton, it will be interesting to see how he shapes at Hastings if lie starts. He is get to carry 9.2 (top weight) in the ■sixfurlong hack race. He tailed badly at Riccarton with 8.13, so that on his showing may be judged the relative value of the hack form of the two islands.

T; Green's Successes at Randwick,

Two New Zealand horses were'piloted to victory at the Australian Jockey Clubs Meeting at Randwick by ,T.'Green, the New Zealand jockey, who returned from Sydney by the Marama. He was up on Catkin when that horse won the, City Handicap, and rode Honour to victory in the A.J.C. Sires' Produce Stakes, one; of the most valuable races in the Australian racing ■ year.. • As a result of these victories Green had tht. highest cash percent age of all jockeys who took part in the meeting. Green stated to an Auckland pressman that the 1 .Randwick course was in excellent condition, except that on one or two days it was on the heavy side. When Catkin scored, the going was very heavy, which suited the New Zealand representative very well. "New Zealand jockeys are not very popular in Australia," Green added. "They do not like us going over and winning some of the big races. However, I have nothing to complain of. New Zealand horses are always popular in Australia; and the victories of Honour and Catkin were well' justified and- well received." . :

Glendowle.

. GlendowLs has been .^nerod tor several hack flat races, to be decided at the Waikato Meeting, and if started the racing should serve to improve him for more important, events to take place later on in the season. Glendowie has been brought across to . Ellerslie on several occasions during v ,the last month, and.his condition indicates that he will soon pet back to racing form again. .

Marton Opens the Jumping Season.

The .Mai-ton Jockey Club has made a departure from its usual custom of holding two days'., racing in the spring and two days in the summer. This year the club decided, to hold one day in September and two days in January, and to hold the fourth day on Saturday, 4th May, which meeting will open the steeplechase season in the Dominion. A very-attractive programme has been drawn up for the May meeting, the chief event being an open steeplechase of £300, two miles and a half. The open flat events are the Crofton Handicap, of £260, one' mile and a quarter, and the Flying Handicap, of £200, six furlongs. ■ The hacks are well catered for, there being the Dash Hack Handicap, of £150, five furlongs; Winter Hack Handicap, of £175, one mile and 137 yards, and the Farewell Hack Handicap, of £150, six .furlongs. 'In addition there *is an Open Handicap Hurdles of £175, one mile and a. half. , Only seven events will be held, and the first race will start at 11.45 a.m.

Yet to Pay a Dividend.

At the sale of yearlings held m New South Wales in the autumn of 1928, four men (Messrs. Robinson, Fell, Hope, and Eearce) combined to purchase the colt by Saltash from- Weltea, and the commissioner acting on their behalf had to carry the bidding to 6750 guineas'to.silence the Opposition. The name of Dominant was selected for the youngster, and though he is not included, with the winners at-two years, old, his prospects at three years old are viewed hopefully.- .Dominant was recently added to the list of geldings.

Mollison's Brother,

'A yearling brother to Mollison (by Seremond—Molly's Robe) figured among the lota submitted at Randwick on the 3rd instant, but though the colt.was of prepossessing appearance no one was prepared to advance the i bidding beyond 1000 guineas, and he was passed in. Subsequently Mr. G. L. Scott made an offer privately for the youngster, and this being regarded as satisfactory,; the colt was sold. It will bj interesting to note as time rolls on which side had.the better of it—the buyer or those who declined to go above 1000 guineas. . ■

Oatendale,

Oatendale, a.. promising' three-year-old colt by Rossendale from Outrock, went amiss while-contesting the Sydney Cup.on Easter Monday, and his case was found to be so serious that it was deemed merciful to destroy him. iln November last Oaten; dale was bought by two-Sydney menj Messrs. G-. H. Magill and M. Robinson, for 2000 guineas, and the only return the partners received as the result of the speculation was £500, which was the prize attached to Oatendale's second position in the A.J.C. St. Leger.

Distance Racing,

Those who have the welfare of racing at heart, look to the metropolitan clubs to do their part in encouraging a better class of racehorse. The Epsom Turf Club took a bold step in that direction when it placed upon its February programme a mile and a half purse corresponding to New Zealand trial stakes events. So successful was' the innovation that the club repeated the experiment at its last meeting a week ago. Owners responded with an acceptance of 21, and of these 18 went to the post. A large crowd saw a splendid race, in which the hurdle horse Quick Deal outstayed Malinche and Glynylln. Scoffers will probably say that the field that contested the race was weak, and that the value of the event, from the point of view, of producing more stayers, was open to question. ' The obvious reply to that would be that purse company is often the stepping-stone to much better things, says the "Australasian." It was in moderate company, at a "dowu-the-line" meeting that the brilliant colt Strephon first gave a taste of his quality; It only requires other suburban clubs to follow the example of the Epsora Club for betterclass horses to be produced, for the present regrettable dearth of stayers to be overcome.

Not Well Known

■A recent winner in Victoria of a fair middle-distance event, who to date has not attracted a great deal of publicity, is Bondi, a. six-year-old son of Boniform and Secret Link, bred by Mr. J. G. Duncan. Previously Bondi had been regarded as purely a sprinter, but on this occasion he ran out the mile and a quarter in good style,-running the distance in 2min 5% sec.

High-priced Sires.

At the Kingfield Stud dispersal . sale most' interest was centred on the two sires Pantheon and Rossendale. A Melbourne ' writer has the following:—Pantheon is a magnificent individual and proved his worth on the turf. He was first used at the stud last spring. Beginning at 3000 guineas, bids of 250 guineas slowly brought the price to 4000 guineas. Then several breeders bid bri?' ly till Mr. Percy Miller finally went 7250 guineas and silenced the oppositiu.' Pantheon is aged only eight years, whereas Rossendale is 17 years. The St. Frusquin horse, however, has made a great hit at

the stud, and still is in blooming condition. The first bid for him was 2000 guineas. By rises of 250 guineas, offers reached 6000 guineas, at which several would-be buyers dropped out-, and the battle.was carried on by Messrs. J. F. Foster, of Cullengoral stud, Gulgong, New South Wales, and Mr. P. Miller. The Kia-ora- studmaster's final bid of 9250 guineas was topped by Mr. Foster's 0500 guineas. As the hammer fell Eossendale, who had been in a most complacent mood, caused much amusement by suddenly cavorting around the ring and neighing loudly. Mr. Foster was warmly applauded on his courageous • purchase. The old horse will' have to travel some hundreds of miles to,reach his new home, whereas Pantheon had to cross only the road dividing Kingsfield from Kia-ora. Mr. Miller was keen to get Rpssendale, but I think his idea when he ceased bidding was that the horse was then above the actual value for a stallion of that age, notwithstanding his success to date.

"There Goes the Little —-"

An Australian huntsman visited England recently, and had a run* with the shires. He rode, straight, as usual, and was well up at the finish. As he rode home, well satisfied with his performance, he found the rest of the field seemed disinclined to speak to him, and noticing the cold shoulder everywhere he wondered what mistake he had made. It was his first appearance in an English hunting field, and he did not want it to be his last. Accordingly he sought out the master, and telling what had happened, inquired what he had done wrong. The reply was, "Well, as you ask me, I'll tell you. In England when the fox-goes away, "it is customary to shout 'Yoicks!< Tally Ho!' not 'There goes the little ' and we did not quite understand it, that's all." The fact that' he had ridden straight, however, covered a multitude of sins, and at the next run he shouted "Yoicks! Tally Ho!" in most approved style.

A System* that Failed,

We often hear .of systems being followed for backing horses, and at times being successful at the outset, with the usual ending—failure. The year in which Hermit won the English Derby there was a man who earned the sobriquet of "Ready Money Riley," through ■ his insistence on always betting for cash, says an exchange. At the beginning of the season of 1866 he was in very poor circumstances, but being a shrewd man he evolved a system of backing horses. Whether there was anything, in it was never known, for the secret died with him. At any rate he managed to borrow a £5 note, to begin with, and in a few. months had £30,000 to his '"•'"lit. He would bet in thonsands ■ race, and always staked his money, v'ne day he backed Hermit for £1000, and 1 when he asked Henry Steel, the' bookmaker, to double the bet he refused, telling Riley that in future he could not possibly undertake to carry such heavy sums of money about with him. He declared he would have to do as others did, book his bets and settle on the Monday. This appeared to break the system up." Whether it was that when he ceased to handle the money he was less careful, than when he had to'stake it at the. time, it was a case of up like a rocket and down like a stick. Riley in a very short time was borrowing a sovereign from th<» man 'who lent: him the fiver to get back to town- after a: race meetinc. .

Mixed Programmes.

In England during the National Hunt Season, which is roughly from Ist December, to the end of March, all racing with the exception', of that at "Liverpool and Bogside is confined to purely jumping events. The winter in England has been a hard one, with postponements asnd abandonments of meetings galore. . This has caused a good deal of; discussion in the Old Country. The idea of having mixed programmes at a number of meetings during the flat-racing season wais '_ put forward as an alternative to another suggestion that the National Hunt Committee should'grant fresh fixtures to,take the place of those abandoned through severe weather.' ■ The present . "oveir-the-sticks" season has been disastrous 'bo far as trainers, jockeys, owners, and/others connected with tlie winter code are concerned. At the Liverpool November Meeting last year, for instance, there were; on the first dayl five flat races and one steeplechase; on the second day four Iflat races, a steeplechase, and a hurdle race; on the third day five,flat races and a steeplechase; and'on the final day four .flat races, a steeplechase, and a hurdle race. /The suggestion that something on similar lines might be adopted.at other meetings was enthusiastically received by some trainers when it was put t» them recently. There seems little doubt that the .suggestion would appeal ltd the general public. - ..-: ,i ■

Reign Count.

Mr. John p. Hertz, owner of the American champion colt Reigfr Count, has no sort of doubt about the/great powers of his horse. In a recent interview with a New York pressman fche American expressed himself thus:—'fWe did not make the trip to Europe to side-step any issues. We believe Reigh Counifc the best thoroughbred in the world, j He is over there ■to prove it. I am interested to learn how Reigh Count will take to the grass courses in England. You know the races are run on the turf over |there. Some seem to think Reigh Count will not run at his best over the turf. I differ from these individuals. It is my belief that Reigh Count will like, the soft cushion of the British turf courses." ; Reigh Count's chief objective is the Ascot Gold Cup, which event is run at weight-for-age over the long course of 2% males.

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Bibliographic details

NOTES AND COMMENTS, Evening Post, Volume CVII, Issue 84, 12 April 1929

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NOTES AND COMMENTS Evening Post, Volume CVII, Issue 84, 12 April 1929

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