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NOTES AND COMMENTS

\BY "VEDETTE/*.

IU.CING JT&rUBES.

February 21—WoodTllIe J.C. February 21—Gore B.C. February 21—Tologa Bay J.C. February: 23—Canterbury J.C. February 27, 28—Dannevlrke B.C. February 28—Walapu B.C. February'2B. March 2—Maryborough K.C. February 16—-Dunedin J.C. February 16—Wanganui J.C. February 16—Poverty Bay Turf C.

The Wellington Meeting. . Nominations for the Wellington-Meeting on 16th and 18th March close next Monday, at 9 p.m.; Forfeits for the New Zealand St. Leger and North Island Challenge Stakes .are due at. the same time. Rangitikei Weights. ' The Rangitikei Meeting draws horses from Taranakj, Mtinawatu, and as far afield as Bawkes Bay and Auckland. The weights issued suggest some interesting racing on the ancient course. Practically all the horses handicapped have raced recently, and their form is well known. A very useful field in the Rangitikei Cup should provide more than an average amount of. discussion, for there are several newcomers to tlfis type of race. Staghunter's name, figures amongst those in the Scott Memorial Handicap, and if started he -will be well scanned. At his best he would make an exhibition of this field. Acceptances close at 9 o'clock next Monday. Winners prior to the meeting are .liable to be rehandicapped. The American Reign Count. - 1 The American colt Reigh Count, having been transported to England, a very keen interest-is centred in the form he will display'when, he conies to race on English, soih In a reference to Eeigh Count Special Commissioner of "London Sporting Life" penned the following:—"A lot has been written about the'entry of the American, colt Eeigh Count for the Ascot Gold Cup. Most of ihis takes the tone that at last a horse has been found in America, of American blood, that is good enough to compete with the best of purs. Now, without disparaging the colt or his sporting owner, it is just as well to point out that he is every bit as much British: bred as any. other horse that will go to the post. Both his sire, and dam were actually foaled in England. The former, Sunr reigh, was by Sundridge out of Sweet Briar, a St. Frusquin mare, that was bred in France in 190S and imported into this .country, in foal, in 1919. The foal was Sunreigh, who was exported to the States with his dam, covered by Sunstaiy the same year. Eeigh Count's dam, Contessina, is a half-sister to Beppo, by Count Schomberg out of Pitti, that was bred by Mr.-James de Kothschild and was sold by him at the December sales of 1916 for 200 guineas. She was then in foal to Bomba, and, after foaling, she left with her foal, and covered by Willohyx, for America. Sunreigh—a brother, by the way, to Sun Briar—and, Contessina both belonged to Mr.W. S. Kilner, who bred Reigh Count arid sold him privately for, it is said, £2400 to his ■ present owner, Mrs. John D. Hertz, of Chicago; Last season Reigh Count wpn four races, which included the Kentucky Jockey Club Stakes, out of fourteen starts." Possibly Good. : ."' Pink ■ Coat won the Dunedin Champagn i Stakes in impressive fashion. He was in front all the way, showing brilliant speed, while he stalled oif Stealth's final challenge "m fine style. He started only twice, his previous appearance being in a maiden race, which he wou, at Oamaru m. December. He is a well-grown youngster, whose chestnut coat is liberally ticked with white hairs. Apart from his speed he shapes like a stayer, which is no surprise when, his pedigree is considered, for his ...dam, Red Edna, is by All. Red from Edna May 11. by Playbill from Puritan by Positano. He is an excellent advertisement: for the young sire Hunting Song, as he looks like making a good three-year-old. ' ,■■•.- Two Improvers. Amor gave further evidence. that he is an'improving horse by dead-heating with Ternbroney in the Warrington Handicap at Dunedin, says the "Star/ in which his welter weight of 10.3 was reduced by 51b apprentice allowance. His youthful rider, »Y. Paseoe, handled Amor to great advantage. He always had the Archery gelding in, a good position, and brought him along in: good style in the straight. Amor will soon have to take his place in open company, but ho may continue to pay his way. there. s . Tembroney, who dead-heated with Amor in the Warrington Handicap, has lost his chance more than once through his failure to.begin smartly. In this race, however, he jumped out exceptionally well, and he wag always one of the pilots. He is a four-year-old by Kilbroncy, and lie should bo worth following during the remainder of this season. : An Interesting Decision. At-a recent meeting in West Australia the stipendiary stewards had an unusual decision to make. In a field of four the New Zealand-bred Prince Nassau looked to have a good chance at the turn, but in the straight Curious came in on him and then took charge, but Golden Mile shot up on the rails and dead-heated with Curious. J. Corry, who rode Prince Nassau, immediately entered a protest against Curious for interference in the straight. As the owner of Curious could not be found until twelve minutes had elapsed the inquiry was delayed. Actually Messrs. Bone and Robertson took pnly a few minutes'to conle to a decision. They upheld the protest, placing Prince Nassau a deadheat with Golden Mile, and giving third place to Curious. They also decided to suspend W. Chadwick,. Curious's rider, for three months. The stewards' decision caused a good deal of argument. Jemidar. Jemidar is weighted for the Australian Cup, two miles and a quarter, at 7.7, and obviously West Australians fancy his chance. A Perth exchange states that when Jemidar ran. the two miles of his w.f.a. race in Perth, in the record time of 3min 25% sec, he beat the 3min 25945 ec established in.tho previous year. When Eurythraic dead-heated ,with ':' Kivoso as a three-year-old in 1910, he; established the then record of 3min 25 4-ssac, ,so that on time alone Jemidar has good qualifications for the East. West Australian horses have done well iv big races in Victoria, and "Maple's last Caulficld Cup ia a • case in point. Australian Two-Yoar-Olds. The outstanding two-year-olds in Sydney are Holdfast, a winner at each of his only four starts, and Rebate, the Redfern colt, ■who registered comfortable all the way victories in both Nursery Handicaps at the A.J.C. Anniversary Meeting.

Whether they are the equal of Victoria's champion, the unbeaten Parkwood, is a moot point, but at the same time, their owners are to be sympathised with in that neither youngster is a candidate for the A.J.C.-Sires'-Produce Stakes of £5000, the richest - race in Australia for horses of their.age, in. which Honour is a likely runner.

Holdfast was not nominated, for the race because his sire, Wedge, is one of the few well-known stallions whose progeny are .not eligible, but he may have a- chance of measuring strides with Parkwood in the Champagne Stakes ■ at the same meeting. Rebate is not in either event, his nomination having,been neglected\owing to his having met with a paddock\ injury early in his career which prompted the fear that he might never face a.starter. Niither Ho'Jfast" nor Rebate »an comparVwith Parkwood bo far as looks are concerned, says an Australian critic, but there is no doubt that both aro sprinters of very high class. ■' , , A Satisfactory Change. At. a meeting of representatives of the Racing and Trotting Clubs, held at Greymouth laßt week, measures were taken to curtail ythe period of racing and trotting in the Christmas and New Year holidays. Hitherto it has broken into three weeks. The Westland Racing Club decided to transfer one of its days to Easter week, and now the Greyinouth. Jockey Club has decided .to do-likewise. This renders it possible to curtail the duration of the holiday carnival substantially. One result of the change, is that the Reef ton Jockey Club trill'be able to follow the Hokitika Club, ■ instead of as heretofore being the ■windißg-UR meeting of the Ooasfc circuits

The circii't will no,; end with the Grervviouth Trttting MeUing, and avoid three or four extra days being required for race meetings. The changes proposed should give general satisfaction. A New Zealand Winner. Lighthearted, the Greyspcar gelding taken to Sydney by F. D. Jones last year, ■was responsible for a good performance at the Kensington" Pony Meeting on 6th February. Drawn near the rails, tie missed the jump, and was last after going half a furlong. Moving through his field in great style, the gelding was fifth at the half-mile; but a little later met with interference, and'had to be cheeked. On regaining his balance, Ligkthearted was taken on to the outside. Iv a feiv strides he overhauled the leaders, and, with two furlongs-to go, looked to have the race in his keeping. But a surprise was in store for backers. Rounding the turn the gelding'lagged oiit badly, and, although given a few sharp cuts with the whip by P. Guttcridge, he ran on to the centre of the course; This cost him several lengths, and his ■ chance looked far from bright. Gutteridge, however, quickly got the gelding under control, and the ex-New Zealander's finishing run was so strong that he hit the front about 50 yard 3 from the post,, and won by two lengths and a half. Amateur and Professional Styles.

Many times the ridiculous and unsafe methods ■ adopted # by professional riders' in' hurdle races • and steeplechases have been referred to, says the "Sydney Herald." A majority of' them appear to labour under the misapprehension that the shorter the stirrup leathers and the nearer the hands are to the horses' ears the better. . This mode of handling a jumping animal is not only unsightly, but decidedly dangerous to all concerned. The reason for the • tendency to accident is obvious.' Everything is left to the horse; and if the animal is so constituted that it appreciates > a rider depending on the bit for his balance, and it is lucky enough to .fly "the obstacles safely on its own initiative, well and good; but if there is a falter or/a• blunder, there is assuredly another story that very often finds its sequel-in the ambulance wagon. Under a heading, "Amateur Riders," London "Sporting Life" has something to say.on the subject. We quote briefly:— "The' reference in a recent issue to the Grand National of-1906, when two amateur riders, the; Hon. A. Hastings and Mr. H. S. Persse, finished ■ respectively first and third, brings to mind the fact that amateur' riders have, for some "reason, a much better record at Aintree than professionals. That is, a larger proportion of amateur t riders get round. the Liverpool course. 'It may be thatthe modern style of riding is.unsuitable. . . It in certain that the amateur style is suited to the stiff Grand National fences.. The short stirrup leather and short reins of the 'pro.' cannot be compared with the hunting seat and long reins of the amateurs, when it" is'essential that the rider should have complete control." . • > .

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NOTES AND COMMENTS, Evening Post, Volume CVII, Issue 41, 20 February 1929

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NOTES AND COMMENTS Evening Post, Volume CVII, Issue 41, 20 February 1929

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