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NOTES AND COMMENTS

RACING TIXTUBES. July 21—South Canterbury Hunt Club. I July 26, 28—Gisborne U.C. August 4—Christchurch Hunt Club. August 14, 10, 18—Canterbury J.C. Grand National. The National Fixture. i Acceptances for the two Grand Nationals and the Winter Cup and general entries for the Canterbury' Jockey" Club's Meeting are due to-morrow at 8 p.m. The Scratching of Glendowie. The owner of Glendowie (Mr. H. Rothery) threw a bombshell into the racing camp yesterday, when he withdrew bis gelding from all engagements at Ricearton, on the grounds that he was harshly handicapped. Owners of horses are of course entitled to their own opinions, and can do as they like with their horses, but if 1111. Rothery had been asked to give his reasons why .he considered Glendowie badly treated at Ricearton it would be safe to say that he would not be able to back them up with actual figures. Glendowie won the Great Northern and Winter ■ Steeplechases at Ellerslie with 0.7 and 10.7 respectively, and the Hunt Club Hurdles with 11.2 on the opening day of the fixture. It is always understood that the essence of handicapping is to give every horse.' a chance and make things equal'for all. Under these circumstances it is as well that all owners do not withdraw their horses from races if they consider them harshly treated, or at times runners would be few. Further, if Glendowie, lit and well, had gone to the post for either the Grand National Steeplechase or Grand National Hurdle Race at the weights allotted to him, it is doubtful if Mr. Rothery would have eared to have fielded against his chance. The Hunt Club Nominations. Judging by the nominations received for the Christchurch Hunt Club's Meeting, the prospects for the Grand National Meeting are anything but bright. The eight in the Homeby Steeplechase certainly include seven National entrants, but one cannot enthuse about them. The Brabason Handicap is rather better, and the Longbeach Hurdles and minor races are much better in comparison. At the same time it looks as if the jumping races at Ricearton are not going to be much above the quality of those of last year,'and that the Grand National Meeting as the final tests of the jumpers of the year is a thing of the past. Another Team for Wanganui. j A team that should have something to say in the decision of some of the spring handicap and weight-for-age events is that at present being trained on the Wanganui trucks by 11. S. Bagby, who has removed there for the winter.. There are seven members of the team, and they comprise the following: High Disdain, Salt Petrel, Jet Black, Concentrate 11, Roseglow (Absurd —Rose Queen), a gelding by Potoa, from Polly Perkins, and a filly by Lord Quex from Catalirii, therefore half-sister to Pflleta. With the seven to represent him during the season that opens next month, Bngby should secure a fail- share of the stake money offering for his patrons. Salt Petrel, Jet Black, and Concentrate 11. are the three youngsters formerly trained by J. Lowe at Trentham. If they are not good, specially Jet Black, it will be surprising. ' Sales in the South. Mr. A. Louisson has bought the rising three-year-old colt Night March, through the agency of Pyne, Gould, Guinness, Ltd. Night March, who was bred and owned by Mr. G. A. Kain, showed good form as a two-year-old, winning the Dunedin Juvenile Handicap at Christmas time, ■while at the Dunedin autumn meeting he dead-heated in the Hopeful Handicap with Full Feather, and ran third in the Chain? jiagne Stakes to Goblin Market, and. Kin-Tin-Tin. Night March is by Mr1." Roberts' imported stallion, Night Paid, from Marsa, herself a good winner, and dam of Full Swing.. The price paid is understood to be a substantial one. The sale is also reported through the same firm of Lady ■ Fuller's Paper Money filly Caterpillar, at 150 guineas, to Mr. P. Delargy. Caterpillarwill go, into J. B. Pearson's stable at Riccarton. Southern Comment on Trentham Racing. The following comment was made on the racing at Trentham last week by the Dunedin writer, "Sentinel," who was present at that gathering :— It is still possible for a horse to be unbacked and unseen in one race and come out again at the same meeting well backed and an easy winner without any questions being asked. The flat racing was full of interest from start to finish, but any comment on the meeting would be far from complete if it did not make reference to the displays of veryl pronounced inconsistent form in which the betting foreshadowed the change. Apparently it was allowed to go without challenge, and this fact becomes most remarkable because the full strength of the 'stipendiary stewards was on the course. ■ Surely the racing public are entitled to know something about very marked changes of form! It is not suggested that there was anything fraudulent about the running, but it at least laid itself open to investigation. If it escaped notice then the stipendiary system as it exists is worse than a waste of money. No doubt those connected with the horses would welcome an opportunity to explain the form, and here again is officinl laxity in not granting them the opportunity; ' King Lei and Son. Few who saw King.Lu battle out his races at Trentham last week realised that he is a-father even if only a five-year-old. Moreover, in a year's time his son will be old enough to do battle himself on the Turf. In 1926 King Lv was mated with the Penury—Tunewha mare Allwin, who goes back to: the Cadogan—Siesta mare Dreamland, Siesta being by Traducer. The juvenile has been named King Win, and according to the Stud Book he conies after his dam had had a rest of a year.. The Turf career of the bay colt by King Lv from Allwin will have many interested observers. He is owned and was bred by Mr. E. B. Hines, who races and trains King Lu. The False Rail. The opinions of experienced racing people are fairly unanimously agahrst the false rail on any racecourse. The scheme was tried in Australia and speedily scrapped. While the scheme is sound in theory, in practice it fails quite often, and in failinc has caused a good deal of trouble. On occasions horses have won races through obtaining their chance at that spot, but if a complete .record of them had been kept, the total Would not be very great. Horses have a tendency to stick "to the rails, and not once, but many times have they been noticed to go right over to the fence at the false rail at both Trentham and Riccarton. This has been no fault of the riders, for the horses have gone in smartly on- their own accord. Naturally there have been narrow escapes from serious accidents. It is an anomaly, too, that about the only two courses in New Zealand where a false is needed the least are in possession of it, Riccarton and Tren tliam.' It is safe to say that more horses win on the outside on both courses than near the rails. On both the run-in of well over two furlongs is sufficient ~~to give any horse a chance if with his or her field at the turn. On some of the small saucer tracks a false rare may be on occasion of advantage to horses "shut in," but not at all on the big roomy courses. New Names. It has been remarked more than once that horses well-named have comprised the celebrities in Turf history, and a glance through the lists certainly shows that few of the real aristocrats had a name which offended the ear. At this period of the year racegoers will be obliged to learn a new 'set of names for the rising two-year-olds. Without some inside knowledge it is at times difficult to appreciate some of the new names at their true worth,' but a run through the list reveals a few good attempts at nomenclature judged only on the breeding. As usual the president of the Conference, Sir George Clifford; has set a worthy example, and it is difficult to beat Semper Paratus (Always Prepared) for the colt by Winning Hit from Equipment. His Quick

, . ("BY VEDETTE.")

Plunge by The Ace from "Brave Deed, and Waterline by The Ace from Sailor's Hope, are also good. The Tea 'Tray—Refinement filly's name of Dresden China has much to commend it, and Merry Peel for the Hunting Song—Mervy Roe coit is suggestive. He is only a yearling, however Academy for the chestnut gelding >iy Leighton from First Class quite neatly combines both sire and dam. Stealth for the Nightyaid—Bendown. gelding is snother good case of both sides of the fam ily being suggested by the name, while Loot for the Nightraid—Currency filly is a sufficiently sinister suggestion. In A\istralia there are also some good examples, one of the best being that of the New Zealand-bred juvenile by Absurd from Impediment in ■ Hum and Haw. This is beaten, however, by Ample Time for a gelding by.Drake from Sister Patience. "One need not be told that the story of Drake's famous game of bowls when the Armada was. sighted is the inspiration. Concerning Greenstone. The Southland gelding Greenstone will be an interesting competitor in the South Canterbury Steeplechase on Saturday, as he is on his way to Riccarton to compete in the Grand National Steeplechase. A year ago Greenstone was in the hack class, but he won considerable distinction by his autumn form in Southland. Opin- j ions are divided regarding him, says a j southern exchange. In some, quarters he I is regarded as a much improved horse, while other critics are disposed to re- j member first of all that he was only a moderate *a year ago, and that he owes his rise in the social scale to his good fortune in meeting-moderate opposition. Wrong Barrier Positions. j Apparently,Jhe stipendiary,.stewards in Melbourne are^.keeping up their activities, for.' followingI'dii'fhe Connolly cuso ; they suspended the State's leading rider, W. Duncan, for a month from ■ Oth July for poaching at the barrier at Moonee Valley. This practice .iv short races on small courses is quite unfair, specially as it is always._ a leading jockey who hustles the lesser lights out towards the outside rails. Duncan is out by himself with 51 winners, and is- sure to finish tip the season as leading jockey in Victoria for the season. A. Reed is seventh on the list With seventeen winners. . , Mr. Adam Skirving, jun.'s, Death. Profound regret has been expressed on all sides at the tragic death of Mr. Adam Skirving, jun., the popular amateur horseman, who was injured in a fall with Cobbon in the Hunt Steeplechase at Moonee Valley on Wednesday, 4th July., He was a son of Adam Skirving, private trainer to Mr. "S. A.Rawdon." Young Skirving had ridden more than 200 winners, and he was classed, as the most capable of our amateur riders, says the Melbonrne "Globe." Always his mounts were well backed by the public. He was highly, popular with all classes of racing, men, not only for his genial personality and gentlemanly bearance at all times, but also for his fearless horsemanship. Not long ago he was appointed starter to the Northern Districts Racing Association, and he was deputy starter to Mr.i N. Wood for the Ballarat District Association. He was a regular follower of the hounds, and he saw no more danger in riding in steeple chases than he did in taking part in a hunt. He had ridden in open company on many occasions. The accident to Cobbon and his ill-fated rider occurred at the first fence—a brush—in the race. .It seemed that Cobbon was crowded for jumping room, and he fell in the middle of the field. Adam was kicked by other horses, but he raised himself into a sitting position before, the ambulance attendants could reach him. R. Latta, who fell with Plainsman at the same fence, | also rushed to'give' assistance. Beyond abrasions, Skirving did not appear to have been injured.. ..-'As a fact he was quite ,conscious .wfie'ri/'conveyed, to, the casualty room, and he objected' to itlio fuss and what ho termed the unnecessary use of the ambulance. Three stitches were put' in a wound in his abdomen. As there Were indications of slight concussion, it was decided to take him to Trinafour private hospital for. observation. Later in the day Skirving had a relapse, and it was decided to perform an immediate operation. While preparations for this were being made the. patient collapsed and died. It is understood that the cause of death was the rupture of a blood vessel near the brain. The, New Trainer of Tea Miss. No stable is more feared by Sydney bookmakers than that presided over by M. Poison, whose chief patron is Mr. Joe Mathews, a prominent member of the ring. Poison is the new trainer of Tea Miss. Time and again the combination, with J. Pike as jockey, has been responsible for successful plunges of great magnitude on metropolitan courses, yet Poison retains his penchant for taking members of his team to country meetings. At Dubbo in May he won the Cup and another race with Boss Poppy, and he did -not start the gelding again until recently, when Boss Poppy took the Rosehill Flying in attractive fashion. In each of the three events Bartle was the rider, because weight did not permit of Pike taking the mounts. Poison announced recently that he had applied to the A.J.C. for a No. 1 trainer's license, and that he had purchased the Raridwick "stables formerly occupied by the late J. Tuckerman. Apprentice Wins V.R.C. National. H. Knevitt had had only one ride over hurdles prior to steering Longlands to victory iv the Grand National Hurdle Race. He rode the Pershore gelding into second place behind Dismal at Moonee Valley some weeks ago. Knevitt's name goes down on the records as one o£ the lightest jockeys who have ever won the big event. He can go to scale at 7.4. J Knevitt has ridden Longlands and other horses over hurdles on many occasions. He is one of the most fearless riders in Melbourne. Knevitt, who is nineteen years old, was born at Clifton Hill, and ho is serving his apprenticeship to V. , O'Neill, owner-trainer of Longlands. A Lucky Man. The London. "Daily Express" had the following reference. to the owner and trainer of the Derby winner, Felstead:— I "Most things that Sir- Hugo CunliffeOwen, an Englishman, has touched in recent years have turned to gold, and it ! was in keeping with his financial success | when the British-American tobacco mag- I nate led in one of the boldest-looking Derby winners which we have had since the- war. Felstead has a rump on him which a heavyweight hunter could not better. 'I have been East and West, but my joy place is Epsom to-day,' Sir Hugo, who is noted for his breadth o£ smile, was heard to say. He told me that naturally, as a sensible racing man, he could only be more hopeful than confident, and • Captain 'Ossie' Bell, his tall and distinguished looking Australian trainer, told me the same thing later. The owner had, however, taken some nice prices, far larger than the returned one. Although Captain Bell had been aa'Sociated with so many big betting partons —notably Mr. Gaulstaun—he bets, only in trifles himself. 'It is only the second horse I have ever run in the Derby,' he told me. 'The first was Corolct. Mr. Leach, as you know, trained Orpheus when he was third to my horse's sire, Spion Kop, in the colours of Felstead's owner. Sir Hugo is particularly pleased because he. bred Felstead himself. Ho bought her handsome northern dam, Felkington, when she was in foal." Sale of Connolly's Horses. The last Metropolitan winner, Murillo, was sold privately by E. A. Connolly for 2500 guineas. Seven of his horses realised at auction 4750 guineas. Afterwards, Murillo and two others were sold privately, in addition to the imported chestnut colt by Sunstar from Shrove. This colt, who is aged three years, is a particularly fine specimen of thoroughbred, and, although he has never raced, his breeding, in addition to his appearance, was expected to provoke keen bidding. The first bid was 3000 guineas, which immediately was increased to 3500 guineas. That price was refused. At the ('vpergal sale of Sir Edward Hulton's horses in England in 1925 Shrove and this colt (then a foal) entered the ring, but they were sold separately. Shrove realised 9000 guineas and

the foal was bought by Connolly for 1/500 guineas. The colt was purchased by Mr. A. G. Hunter. It is simiouncod that Connolly will go abroad for a holiday during his term of disqualification. Odds and Ends. There will be plenty of riding talent available at the • Gisbornc Meeting next week. B. Reed. T. Green, B. J. Mackic, G. Holland, and L. Hanson are all booked lor the trip. The- Auckland handicappcr, Mr. F. J. M'Manemin, was a spectator at the bigjumping meeting at Flemington. Trainer J. H. Jeft'erd rarely patronises the. East Coast meetings, but he is taking a small team to the Gisborne meeting, and at least one, in Dishonoured, will be hard to beat. Since the meeting held in Wangamii last May, Alan M'Donald, the well-known hurdle rider, has had no less than •fifteenfalls. Tliis must be near the record. After he ran and fell at Ellerslie in June Maunga was not jumped till lie ran and fell in the last Hawkes Bay Steeplechase. He was again put by till he performed similarly in, the Wellington Steeplechase last Wednesday. Horses cannot do ■without schooling. Radiate hurt a muscle in hifl race at Trentham last Wednesday, and was not able to' start again at the meeting.

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NOTES AND COMMENTS, Evening Post, Volume CVI, Issue 15, 19 July 1928

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NOTES AND COMMENTS Evening Post, Volume CVI, Issue 15, 19 July 1928

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