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THE TRUANT STAR.

Old King Sol rubbed his eyes and nestled in his bed of cuddily cloudy with a heavy sigh of relief. The fishermen of the sky hauled in their nets of rose and gold and the purple dugk of twilight softly began to fall. . "Hurrah!" cried the stars, "at last the day is o'er soon dear Mother Moon will be ready to take us for a, frolic over the sky! Suddenly over the horizon a glorious halo of light began to appear, and Mother Moon stepped on to the stars' playground. How v sweet she looked jn her dainty, golden gown sprinkled with'fairy dust and tiny fairy sandals embroidered with' stars. ;

"Come, children," she pried, "we must away! I know tarn late, but Venus had a sore throat and I had to wait,to see her gargle it properly!" .-■•-«.

then o'er the sky a gentle breeze came whispering, scattering the stars everywhere. But one little star sat in the middle of the playground thinking ever so hard.

"I know," he said, talking to himself, "I'll go to the Earth; it will be great fun! Now, one, two, three, and I'll jump!" 0. no, you won't," said Mother Moon, "you'll sta y i U st where you are!" ■'■'•> '

So that is why in the evening a little star is always close to the m00n .... O ever so close. And there he'll ever have to stay, : Because he tried to run away; While other stars are scattered round Like daisies o'er the dew-wet ground. ' KATHERINE MASON.

TONGUE-TIES. Say these quickly: Tommy the tijjer took two ties to tie two tabs to two tall trees. Shave a cedar shingle thin. LES SEWELL.

Brooklyn. GREW LA YBIRD'S STORY. "I'm not really tired, Mummy...." "Well, then, Dear, listen to wha,t the freeij ladybird told me just this morning." , The last glint of sun was shining through the branches. Two birds were •ailing one another.., ...;. "Come live with me,. .Come live with me. Come be my love...Come be my love." The breeze was rustling the grasses. Paint tree scents filled the air. The tall grasses rattled. All the tiny ground animals shut up their houses for the night and went to bed. The Ladybird paused on her way home. "I'll live with you. I'll live with you. Come here to me.. .Come here to me," tlw answer came.

Day was fading. Twilight was creeping over the sky.

"We'll build a. home, Dear. .We'll build a home in a clumpy ti-tree bush. And we'll kiss and love all day, Dear, and at night we'll snuggle close. And I shall find the straw, My Love, and you will find the down."

So the pretty eggs were laid, Babe-O'-mine. And you'll hear the blackbird say, "Be quick...Be quick...Be quick. .." until the eggs are hatched and the four little birdies chirp and quiver in the snn. ■

Wellington. MISSEL THETJSH.

EXCHANGE IS NO BOBBERY.

Here's a quiet game—that, is if you can call a game where you all go into fits of laughter a quiet game. But what I really mean is that it is one where you do not romp about and make a din to worry mother. It is called "Exchange is no Bobbery," and the idea is for aU the players to think of the funniest objects they can, so that they can exchange them for something else with the next player. Suppose the first player starts off:— "I have an old Antelope which I would like to enhance. .What will you give me for it? " Then the next player replies, "I will give you a Banjo for it." Hjs object, you sco, must begin with aB. Then the third player exchanges an article'beginning with a C with the next player for one beginning with a D. The funnier are the things you think about, the funnier will be the game, when you exchange horses for indiarubber, buses for carrots, etc.

OPEi\ EY S. "My brother ana I found a fantail's nest. It was such a darling wee thing, all soft and cuddly looking. It was hanging on to a branch, and had a wee round hole for the birdies to get in. We could not see ,the eggs in the bottom without disturbing the nest, so wo did not look very hard. The nest had a lovely little roof over' the hole, and there was a lot of moss on it, and a 'number of wee pieces of lace-bark woven in and out of the nest." T?AY ELVIN. Wellington. "The other day mother found my little brother with a hammer chopping up one of her best tea cups, and when she asked him why he was doing it and scolded him he said: "Daddy do it for the fowls!" He had seen Daddy chopping up bits of crockery for the fowls last Sunday." JOYCE SMITH. Kelburn. "One week-end I spent at Titahi Bay with the rest of the family. As we were walking up the road one afternoon we spied a fat brown and white duck. On closer observation she was found to be sitting on a nest. Such a cosy little corner it was in, too, quite open to view, with dry nigger-head on either side like ■ brown curtains. A little later we were again passing that way. Next day it was, but, alas! where was the little mother 1 and her 'eggs? Nothing remained but. the exquisitely shaped hollow whore the eggs had rested. Some -time afterwards •. when in conversation with a friend out there we were told that some cruol people had stolen the eggs, probably for supper, and I hope they enjoyed it, as the duck had been sitting for some time " HELEN CHEISTIE. Kilbirnie. "One morning as we were having breakfast I looked up and what do you think I saw? A dear little fantail perched on the electric light cord! It began to chirrup such a squeaky little song. Ho had come in the door, and was not a bit afraid. "Do you know what he looks like? He is a ,tiny little 'long-tailed bird and he spreads out like a fan. He has a brown breast, and a dear little black eye with a white ring round it." ALICE DICK. Ngaio. ' We had an old black eat come to our place about two years ago. It brought five kittens to live here. People told us to drown them, But instead we found homes for four of them and kept one for ourselves; ~a;.,grey--onepso tvo- hare the mother and-her:ion. These- two are like an alarm clock, for they come : op the window sill and' call us at half-past 6 every morning. MABIE M'.CBAE. Ngaio.

IT'S HERE.

SAND MARBLES.

GAMES TO PLAY. THE "STAB PAETY." Capital fun is got out of a "Star" Pai'ty) where every guest, is called upon to do something to amuse the rest. There are always those among the elder children who are delighted to bo the eeutre of attraction, while even the shy ones eventually work up to the fun of being "stars" of tho occasion. The child called upon- to entertain may dance, sing a verse of a song, play the piano; recite; ask riddles, do a card trick, a .match trick, or any other trick;.or play the "Star" in any way preferred. The funnier^the things done the better, and all. items should be short. Some of the children would, no doubt, be able to do lightning drawing of their companions. ' As most schools have "pupils' days," even the Jittle kindergarten child is nowadays used to facing an audience and doing a stunt on its own. HOUSE T.Q LET. Arrange chairs in a circle for all the players, placing them as clobo together as possible. One stands in the middle leaving his ehajr empty. This is the house to let, and as the players move round he must get into a chair as quick. ly as possible, and the one who is left without a chair has to stand in the centre. POKE-POKE. All players sit on chairs and one player is blindfolded and has a piece of paper made into a poker, and goes to a player and says "Poke-poke." The player is to. disguise his voice and say the same. If the person blindfolded guesses the person's name the other takes his place. JUNE VINSEN. Wellington.

Now, please, dou 't forget to pack a few of your marbles in your holiday trunk, or if you are already away, then just buy a pennyworth, for you can have some good fuu with them on the sands.

One good game is tp build little castles with the sand when it is a bit wet so that the stand sticks together well. Make tunnels through the bottom of your sand castles. You can do this with the aid of daddy's stick, but be careful that the sand doesn't fall into the cavity and fill it up. Give each hole a number and then the gamo'is- for* each" "pTayer'"to" bowl' his' .marbles at the different holes trying to get them in, and thus scoring some points.

Each player should roll about half a dozen marbles, and the one getting the highest score of points wins.

THE-MONKEY-NUT EACE,

Quite an exciting game can be played ■with some small bags, made either of muslin, pongee silk, or any other thin material of the kind, -.filled, but not too full, with-monkey-nuts, each bag containing the same weight of nuts. Two lines of players are formed, facing each other, with a chair at the end of each twin-line, and the bags of nuts, about; a dozen, more' or less, so long as the number is even, must be piled, in two equal; heaps on. the chair at the top of the line.; At a given signal the two players nearest the chair each seize a bag and pass it from one hand to the other, then hand it on to the next player, who follows the example of the first, and so it goes on all down the lines to the further chair, each bag following its predecessor as quickly as possible. As soon as all the bags have reach- ] ed the lower chair, they must be started back as swiftly as they came, and the line that can. pass back the quickest all its bags to the top chair is the winner. POOR PUSSY. J know a very jolly game, ancl this is how it is played. The players sit on the floor in a ring. One of the players walks round, the inside of the ring carrying a cushion. Meantime music is played, and when the music sfiops the cushion is placed before the nearest player, who in reply to tho word meow", has to reply "Poor pussy" without laughing, and if tho player laughs he takes the place of the first one, and goe.s through the same performance. The object of the game is to cause a laugh by saying "Meow" in a tunny way.

ATHALIE EATON,

Wadestown,

s It's really and truly here at last . . . the time that all the Year has ■waited for .. .Christmas!

Tlie shops have become Wonderlands, and the windoivs are full to the brim with all the things you didn't know you wanted! There's the doll with the dimply knees... -her cheeks are cool <w a petal... the splendid Meccano crane, the enormous giraffe with the neck that bends and the Ted with the brown toffee eyes! Whoever thought they.d ever come true!

And O! it's picnic days in the sun now .. . ivhole days of gold sand by the sea or green shadows between the fern. So off with you now, and don't come back till your toes are as brown as they're meant to be, and there's no -skin left on your noses! Here's all my love . . . the Merriest Christmas and the Happiest of New Years to every one of you!

FAIRIEL.

'fir D OWN fo ffie «*, ffie fig s*tt «* ■, ■■'lSa: ?£&: Down to the rocks and the sands we fce^ .H^ ■■%* M)own where-the. gleaming sea-shells lie ' ''$S% t°Nr|jr'-. And the white sea-birds go wheeling bji;, siz?° SbCES. . —**«!» Bow"**

JUMBLES. Have you ridden in any of these!

• U C I BE. ■WP.IT S •■-•... IT A F AHSN UD E.B.K AKTSE N V SEB AM DBANTSAD LUVANC ENAE HE.V.COLBE.T SYDNEY PBIEST. Belmoht. '.■.■■:. : . "•■■■

THINKTWICE. : V A JIGrSAW.

Cut out or trace carefully these black shapes and rearrange them so as to form a crab. The figure will appear white on a black background.

A MATCH TRIQK.

Lay nine matches down and hand your friend a tenth, inviting her to lift all nine with it—and iißing one hand only. Sounds difficult, doesn't it? but it's really quite easy. ■-■

The trick is done by laying one ihatch down and thq other eight across it-on alternate sides. Lastly, the tenth match is placed above these and the first one as seen by A in Eig. 1. Using the lower match as a holder, you will find" you' can ; hft all of them as in Fig; 2. ;; ■

FOR LITTLER ONES.

The first two lines of a well-known nursery rhyme are bidden in theseTquares You can spell out the words by S from one letter to another, either Tp ™ of -but not across tlfe coiner ot the square. The pictures will help you if you're very tiny but if y O ?re in the least big it won't be very hard"

SWEh'l MAKERS. TOFFEE APPLES. I am going to tell.you a sweetmake. lib of small eating apples. ' lib of treacle. lib of sugar. . . .;•"..', ' ' :'■■' 4oz of butter. ■ , .... . A thin stick of wood sharpened to. a point at one end; for each apple. Place your butter in a saucepan arid molt it over a low flame. Add the treacle and the sugar and stir the mixture until it comes to the boil. Let it boil for about 15 minutes and test in. cold water, to sec if it hardens. Leave in the pan to cool slightly. Wipe the apples and remove their stalks. Put a wooden stick in each applo and dip the apples in the toffee till they are well covered. Stand the apples- upright in a jar to cool. With love from " DICK DANIELL. Mastorton. TURKISH DELIGHT. I thought I would send" in a, recipe of Turkish Delight. Soak two ounces of gelatine in one and a half cupfuls (small) of cold water two hours. Put two pounds of sugar into a saucepan with one and-a half cupfuls of water. Bring to: the boil and then add the soaked gelatine a little, citric acid, and any flavouring. Simmer, for twenty minutes, skim well, and then pour on. a damp dish. Leave- for twenty-four hours, and then cut up in squares, and roll in "castor sugar. For colouring, use either dochineal or saffron. If cochineal, a -rose , flavouring is nice to. use. I think this would be nice. ■ DOROTHY WOODLEY. . Lower Hutt. ' FIG ROCK. This is for Pig Eock:— 1 cup sugar. •'..,,. 3 cup water. i teaspoon cream of tartar.. Split toasted figs. •■■■.-.•,, „ ■.. Boil sugar and water together.withr out stirring till of an amber.: colour. ' Add cream of tartar and .then the .figs.. Pour into buttered baking tin.': '■'. •■-■■•■ :- ELAYNE MACLAEEjST. Martinborough. '■■■"'■: HOKEY POKEY. : I've got a lovely recipe for you, Fairiel. Don't you thing Hokey Pokey sounds lovely? Well, it tastes lovely, too. , '" - ' , 1 cup of sugar. ; '■■ ;. ' '''-' 1 tablespoon of w»ter.,. : .„. ..:";,'..". ~v 3 tablespoons' of rgqjdp'n &ywp- ■ : ■.■ 1 heaped teaspoon, -of.baking -sodal: Put the sugar, golden"" syrup, and water in a saucepan-arid stif: the :niixture till a bit dropped in cold water will go hard. Then put in the baking soda, and stir it. Pour into a buttered dish and leave till hard. You will be surprised to sec how much there is. SHIRLEY EQBERTS. Wellington. WALNUT MOLASSES. One ounce of chopped walnut, rjlb of brown sugar, i gill. of water, loz-.of butter, 1 tablespoonful of golden syrup, 1 pinch of cream of tartar.'. Put all in- ! gredicuts except the walnuts into a saucepan, boil to. 290 degrees, pour, on to a greased dish or slab", and sprinkle walnuts over. When cool enough to handle, fold, pull, and twist it well. Cut into pieces with scissors before it gets hard. Wrap in. wax paper. . FAY HENSHILWOOD. Kilbirnie. ■■ ; HONEY CANDY. Two large cups sugar, 1 teacup honey, 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar. Method: Boil until a little hardens in .water, pour into greased tin, and cover with blanched halved nuts. „ GRACE EDS; .

WIK> ORCHIDS.

Travellers have risked their lives for them in the fever-ridden tropical forests, where the gorgeous flqwersprays hang out from soaring iiehen-covered trees. Kjch-men have spent small fortunes in buying and rearing the rarest varieties. Why? They are the "Royalty" of the flower Hingdoin, with the largest "wardrpbe" of picture dresses, which poor humans cannot but worship. And, like audacious woodland elves, they mimic their superiors—not only mischievous flies, bees, and other insects, but man himself!

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19271219.2.166.2

Bibliographic details

THE TRUANT STAR., Evening Post, Volume CIV, Issue 147, 19 December 1927

Word Count
2,825

THE TRUANT STAR. Evening Post, Volume CIV, Issue 147, 19 December 1927

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