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NEWS OF THE DAY

The Fourth of July. Monday, 4th July, is the national holiday of the United States, and American Consular offices in the Dominion will bo closed. In accordance with the usual custom, tie American Consul-Gen-eral to New Zealand and staff will be at homo to callers at the Consulate Gonoral, Vickers Building, from 10 to 12 on Monday. Snow at National >?ark. v A heavy fall of snow has been experienced during the last few days at the Tongariro National Park. The mountains looked magnificent on Wednesday morning in tho sunshine, with their new coat of snow down to the 3000 ft level, states the "New Zealand Herald." Ngauruhoo was emitting a good column of steam, and the bush was beautifully festooned with snow. There was about eight inches of snow at Whakapapa huts. Ski-ing conditions are good. "A Plague of Inquiries." A report that a woman had given birth to quintuplets (five children) in St. Helens Hospital, Pitt street, has caused tho institution to be deluged by inquiries from tho curious, states tho "New Zealand Herald." An official stated last evening that there was no foundation for the report, and it would bo a relief if its public denial , ended tho plague of inquiries. Tho birth of quintuplets was some years ago credited to a woman in Kentucky, United States, and there was also the authentic case of tho wifo of a South African mastor mariner having presented him with quadruplets, a photograph of the quartette appearing in illustrated journals at that time. Patriotic Railwaymen. During his soarch for new business for tho railways in South Auckland territory, Mr. A. W. WoUsted, business agent, recently found a community whore railwaymen had applied the proverb "Charity begins at home" in practical form, states tho "New Zealand Herald." On learning that local storekeepers were not patronising the railway for tho carriage in spito of a roduced rate they quietly severed their patronage from all local stores and arranged for a continuous supply of goods, including groceries, from Auckland, stixiulating that all such goods must be sent by rail. The storekeepers aro reported to bo making overtures for the resumption of tho lost patronage, which was worth about £300 a month. "Getting More Than He Earns." Describing it as a possible cause of unemployment, the Mayor of Christchurch (Mr. J. K. Archer) asked at the annual meeting of the Canterbury Progress League if the drift from the country to tho towns would be considered in the agricultural research being undertaken by tho Progress League— and evoked some opposition during his comments on Jho poini (states the "Press"). Remarking that unemployment was equally serious for town and country, tho Mayor said he had been informed that there were 30,000 fewer men on the land to-day than in 1919. If such was tho case, it might be easy to account for much of their unemployment. It might also be the cause of the trouble over wages. A voice: "The Arbitration Court is the cause." "It may bo," replied Mr. Archer, "but I can assure you that no man in the Dominion is getting more than he needs." "He is getting more than he earns, though," said another interjector. At a later stage, Mr. D. Bates declared that the farmer was getting but a miserable pittanco by comparison with what lie earned. Ho created 90 Ter cent, of the Dominion's exportable wealth, and got just what he was permitted to hold by the community through which the wealth passed. Anglo-Saxons Wanted. AVhat .was termed "a wise policy of immigration" was advocated at tho Conferenco of the Protestant Political .Association, but all proposals were condemned "which have for their purpose the encouragement of immigration from Southern Europe and Asia, believing that the best results, racially, socially, and economically, can be secured to Now Zealand by settling people of An-glo-Saxon stock upon the land.'-'? i

Adaptation of Latin. The Auckland Society of Arts has a Latin motto, "Vectae cum laritras artes," a translation of which is, With our household gods we have brought our arts." The allusion evidently is to the colonisation of New Zealand, but Mr. A. S. Boyd, president of tho society, in opening the annual exhibition on Thursday evening, gave tho words a humorous twist. With the help of several learned friends, he said, he had ascertained their real meaning, which was, "Buy as many pictures as you can, and make them part of your domestic life." This adaptation of Latin to advertising was doubtless appreciated by exhibitors in the audience who had pictures for sale. Sparrows in Tunnel. The "cheekiness" of the sparrow is traditional, but the limit of daring appears to have been reached by a number of these birds which daily visit the Purewa tunnel, now in course of construction in connection with the Auckland - Westfield railway deviation (states the "New Zealand Herald"). The birds chirp and nutter round the working-face at tho south end of the tunnel, which has been driven a distance of approximately • six chains. When the tunnel was first started the sparrows used to gather round the feedbags of the horses, and, as the work has advanced, the birds have ventured further and further inside the tunnel, which is lighted by electricity, for gleanings from the horse-feed or crumbs from a tunneller's "crib." The deafening reports from the explosion of a round of drill holes and the resultant cloud of noxious gelignite fumes do not frighten the birds. As soon as the men resume work after the "blast" the sparrows also resume their interrupted foraging. A curious fact is that the majority of the birds are hens; a cock bird is very rarely seen inside the tunnel. The bottom heading of the tunnel is inhabited by millions of glow-worms, while the timber sets are festooned with hanging bunches of fungus, the whole scene being weird and fantastic. A Maori Movement. On Wednesday evening within the walls of the Kaiwharawhara, Wharepuni, the West Coast Maori Congress was definitely inaugurated, states the "Wanganui Herald." A large number of young Maoris came to Wanganui for the meeting, and much enthusiasm in the new movement was shown. Prom being a local organisation, the movement has now become one of widespread interest, and representatives were appointed for the various districts within the electorate. The term I I'Young Maori" should not give the impression that the leaders are youths, for they are men prominent in the life of the various communities. They are keen and alert in the power of their new organisation, which they confidently claim has the almost unanimous backing of their people, and an era of progress is expected throughout the electorate. According to present indications Arohanui will continue to be the centre of the movement, and the people of this area will thus be kept well aware of what is taking place. Congratulations have been extended to the prime movers upon their efforts to meet tho present-day needs of the Maori race. Auckland's Windmill.' After a lapse of three years, the old windmill in Liverpool street, near Grafton Bridge, which has been a familiar landmark on the Auckland skyline for 80 years, is once more to be fitted with four sails, states the "New Zealand Herald." Since May, 1924, when two of the sails were damaged beyond repair in a severe gale, the work at the null has been carried out mainly by means of electric power, and the two remaining sails have remained idle for tho greater part of the time. Believed to bo the only wind-driven mill in Australia or New Zealand, the famous brick landmark was erected in tho 'forties by Mr. C. F. Partington, an engineer and millwright by profession, iho bricks were made from clay du<* from the site on which the mill still stands, and the walls are in some places 3ft thick. In this old building was manufactured tho Hour for the Auckland people in tho early days of the city and for tho supply of the Imperial troops during tho Maori wars. For some time work ceased at the mill and tho sails were taken off. They were ultimately restored by the present owner, Mr. J. Partington, son of the builder, who also raised tho height of the ?ni! byr?ft Its Present height is SOft, and it thus takes full advantage of the wind. Since tho damage was caused by the storm in 1924, the two remaining sails have worked spasmodically. The old mill has presented a rather forlorn appearance with its two long stationary arms pointing in opposite directions.

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY, Evening Post, Volume CIV, Issue 2, 2 July 1927

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1,432

NEWS OF THE DAY Evening Post, Volume CIV, Issue 2, 2 July 1927

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