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NEWS OF THE DAY

Sanders Cup Trials. In the yachting notes on another page will be found a reference to the adoption of a points system in connection with the Sanders Cup by the Otago ; Yacht and Motor-boat Association. This paragraph was based on a telegram from .Dunedin, in which the word "trials" was omitted, and advice has now come to hand that the adoption of the system applied only to the Otago Sanders Cup trials, and not to the actual contest, which will be held at Lyttelton early next year. Directorship of Education. The retirement of Mr. Caughley from the office of Director of Education has caused widespread interest among all sections of teachers, as well as others who take more than a passing interest in educational affairs. A very natural inmulso is, to ask who will succeed him, and a good many think that now is a favourable opportunity of reforming the constitution of tho Department and setting up a board or council instead of a one-man directorship. The president of the. Educational Association of New Zealand has addressed a letter to tho Minister of Education requesting him to delay tho appointing of a new Director until the council of the association has an opportunity of presenting a considered opinion on the subject. The Minister has himself moro than hinted at a consolidating Bill next year, which makes the occasion specially favourable. Theatre Buses to Bun. A certain amount of doubt seems to to have arisen in regard to the running of theatre buses between the city and the Hutt Valley now that the Motoromnibus Act insists that a definite timetable must be observed, the difficulty being that theatres do not work to time-table. In order to ascertain tho position, the proprietors of buses engaged in this service recently wrote to the City Council, as licensing authority, and the matter was considered at yesterday afternoon's meeting of the Bylaws Committee. The committee"'s views, which are subject to ratification by the council, are that' the buses should continue to run for the benefit of theatre patrons, providing that a time-table is reasonably adhered, to, having regard to tho difficulties of absolute regularity, that the buses are parked at such places as tho traffic officer may set aside, and providing also that the clause of the Act dealing with "excess fares" (i.e., twopence in excess of tram fares) shall be observed where passengers are not carried ,be- . yond the city boundaries. Glowworms in a Tunnel. Thousands of glimmering glowworms that line the interior of the Purewa tunnel, now in course of construction .under the St. Heliers Bay road, pro-side visitors and the men working in tho tunnel with food for speculation (states the "New Zealand Herald"). The minute living lamps illumine the bottom heading of the tunnel for several chains into the hill, and men with thirty years' experience of underground work in various parts of the world declare they have never seen such a sight in a tunnel working. The glowworms no doubt originated in the bush-clad gully situated at the city end of the tunnel, and entered the workings in search of darkness, but as the concrete lining of the tunnel is steadily advancing and covering up the soft rock sides and roof, it is clear that they arc doomed to extinction. Reason For Drift to the Towns. "A great many people forget the part a woman plays in the settlement of land," said the Hon. O. J. Hawken, Minister of Agriculture, speaking at Huapai on Wednesday. "I am quite sure that if farmers were to make their surroundings better, it would be to the advantage of everyone. I am satisfied that one of the reasons for the drift to the towns is that women find ,it hard to live in the country. There are hard conditions which, I believe, could bo avoided in some cases, and I am sure if you pay more attention to that than in the past it will have good effect."

Battle of Le Quesnoy. Thursday was the eighth anniversary of the capture of Le Quesnoy by the New Zealanders in the advance that led to the end of the war. The passage of the moat and the assault on the walls of the town by means of sealing ladders lent to the hostilities a mediaeval touch, the humour of which was not lost ou the division in tho general appreciation of the gallantry of the Rifle Brigadesmen who carried through the attack. A Change of Name. A decision to change the name of the Auckland Animal Welfare League to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was made at a meeting of the committee of the league (states the "New Zealand Herald"). The league was formed some months ago to take over animal welfare work when it was relinquished by the society, which also dealt with the protection of women and children, and which is now carrying on its work separately. The Daylight Limited. The Railway Department will recommence the daylight limited service on the Main Trunk railway between' Auckland and Wellington on the morning of Monday, 6th December. The time-table provides, for the departure of the train from Auckland at 7.53 a.m., and the North-bound train will leave Wellington at 7.55 a.m. The only innovation of note will be the inclusion of National Park among the stopping-places. This step is being' taken in accordance with the policy of the Government of increasing tourist traffic, as it is hoped to popularise still further the attractions of National Park and also encourage the tourist traffic to Taupo and Rotorua. Hitherto it has been possible to reach National Park only by the night trains arriving at 3.20 a.m., and to make the return trip the traveller had to join the train at 11.12 p.m. The inconvenient hour at which trains arrived and departed no doubt discouraged numbers of people from visiting the famous holiday resort. According to present arrangements the daylight limited from Auckland will arrive at National Park about 3 p.m., the Northbound train leaving there at 4 p.m., and arriving at Auckland at 11 p.m. Taupo Fishing Rights. From an incident which occurred at Taupo a few days ago an impasse seems likely in regard to the question of fishing rights, observes tho Napier ''Daily Telegraph." While some enthusiasts were fishing at the lake a prominent Native resident in tlie Waitahanui district approached one of them, and stated that the Natives wore dissatisfied with the proclamation, ar.d were going to insist that tho fees for entering their lands bo still -paid by fishermen. The Natives, he said, were not going to accept the regulations, and would unite to keep fishermen off their lands till they paid the fees as last year. It was pointed out to the chief that the regulations abolishing the entrance levies were law, and that the Natives could not possibly maintain their attitude successf- ily, but the Maori stated that his people would remain firm. The news of the Native threat rapidly spread through the fishing camps, and the matter was reported to the police, who, it is, understood, are undertaking to point out to the Natives that they cannot legally stop the fishermen entering the proclaimed areas. It is said that the Maoris' argument is that they have not been advised that the 'iver has been opened to the holders of licenses, and, furthermore, that all notices issued are printed in English only. They contend that "Gazette" notices and regulations" should have been, circulated in Maori as well as in English. The matter has been referred to the Minister of Native Affairs. A Hutt Flood Incident. The Hutt River, with its rapid rises after rain, causes no little auxiety to' those responsible for the construction work on the new railway bridge. The embankment where a ballast train was loading was undermined a few days ago, and the locomotive ard seven trucks subsided into the water. No one was hurt, and after much labour the train was replaced on the rails and the embankment repaired. This is not the first time that the river has caused damage to the construction works, and those engaged on the job have always to be on the alert, since the river has been known to rise over 3ft in five minutes. Check Meters Pay Handsomely. Sonic rather interesting figures in regard to electric lighting charges wore laid before a "Post" reporter to-day in two accounts in respect of the same house for the same period, one account for the whole place, the other for the check meter, recording the amount of current consumed in a part of the house only, a system very commonly employed in the case of flats and apartment-houses. In such cases the tenant pays the whole amount as shown in tho main account and passes the check meter account on to the subtenant for settlement of his share.. In the case mentioned to the reporter the main account figures were these:— Lighting: Seven units at 8d (less 2d discount for prompt payment), 3s 6d. Heating: Twenty-one units at 2d, 3s Od, ten units at lid, Is 3d, 4s 9d. Total for the whole house, 8s 3d. So far, so good; but tho check meter account for part only of tho house gave these figures:—lighting: Nineteen units at 8d (less 2d discount), 9s Gd. In this instance the check is simply a check, and there is no question of tenant and sub-tenant, but the same thing must apply in many, apartment-houses, where, on account of a marked peculiarity in the system of computing lighting and heating charges under the domestic tariff system, the landlord gets all his lighting and heating free, and, moreover, makes a profit on it. Manawatu Gorge Slip. The work of clearing the big slip on the Manawatu Gorge is expected to be ooniplete'd by the Bailway Department to-day. It proved an exceptionally difficult job, as the whole hillside was on the move, and clearing the line by ordinary methods merely provided space for more debris to come down. Heavy scouring by large bore high pressure water sluices was therefore resorted to, and this work was being carried on this morning. The action of the Railway Board in carrying stock from the AVairarapa and Hawkes Bay districts, which always provide a greater part of the interest at the Palmerston Show, via the Rimutakas and Wellington without extra charge was much appreciated by those exhibitors, who at first were doubtful of risking the longer journey with their stock, but were so pleased with their condition on arrival that at the close of the show, when they were offered the alternative of droving some of the horses, cattle, and sheep through the gorge, and entraining on the other side, which would have saved them four hours, the exhibitors preferred to send their animals again via the Rimutaka. This speaks well for the care taken by the railway officials to ensure smooth running on such steep grades. The arrangements for tho stock were made by the divisional superintendent for the North Island (Mr, E. Casey).

Mrs. J. Donaldson, a married woman, aged 60, who resided with her husband at 179, The Esplanade, Petone, was found dead in her bath at 7 a.m. to-day. She rose at 6.30 a.m. aud went to take a bath, and it is presumed that she died from heart failure. An inquest is being held at Petono this afternoon.

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY, Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 111, 6 November 1926

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1,916

NEWS OF THE DAY Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 111, 6 November 1926

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