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SOCCER

Br ' Vanouaud" THE CHATHAM CUP

HOSPITAL DEFEATED

TO-DAY'S GAME AT THE BASIN.

Last Saturday interest centred in the meeting of Hospital and North Shore in the Chatham Cup semi-final. To-day, Sunnyside and North Shore are meeting on the Basin Beserve to decide who should hold the Chatham Cup for the next twelve months. The game between Hospital and North Shore at Auckland provided one of the most exciting and thrilling cupties played at Blandford Park for many a long day. Hospital were easily the favourites for the match, and the most ardent Shore supporters did not expect their team to do so well. The team was not finally selected until the day before the match, owing to doubts about injured players. Their display was as surprising as Hospital's was disappointing. Ou paper, Hospital seemed capable of winning comfortably, as their team was at full strength, and the players were much more experienced than their opponents. Hospital, however, failed to justify expectations. The team work, which is such a noticeable feature of their play, was missing, and there was quite a lack of cohesive play. They were, nevertheless, distinctly unlucky to lose, as the scores went. The fourth ggal which was obtained by Shore during the extra time and which eventually decided the issue was a bad decision (states a correspondent). Jay, the centre-forward, was standing offside when the ball was pushed up to him, and it was so glaring that the crowd, which was very sporting and impartial, rose and shouted in protest when the referee pointed to the middle of the field. It is, of course, all in the game, and Hospital took the decision very well. Heavy Grounds. ■■ The football produced f>y both teams was not of a high order, and this was due to the state of the ground. The heavy rain that fell at mid-day did not improve an already soaked ground. Neither did- the curtain-raiser that was played. The latter could quite easily have been dispensed with 'under the circumstances. North Shore showed greater speed in their play than Hospital, and also adapted themselves to the conditions much better.- The football was of cup-tie standard, and the quickly changing fortunes of the game had the crowd in a state of enthusiasm. Shore were the first to score, and the ' applause had hardly died down when Hospital equalised. A little later, Hospital gained the lead, but almost im- ; mediately tho home team, amidst great excitement, drew level from a penalty kick, and before the spell ended, gained the lead, the score being 3-2, The "consistent scoring kept the crowd on the gui vive, and fast and even play kept up the excitement. The second half as not nearly go exciting as the first, and only produced one goal. This was obtained by Hospital, close on. time, and followed a period of desperate efforts to break down a sterling defence. It was a shot from Newman that levelled the score again, and it was the best goal of the match, a fast drive which the goal-keeper had no chance of saving. What a roar went np from the crowd! It was repeated a moment later when Shore rushed to. the other end for Porteous to bring off a wonderful save. Extra time was [ thus necessary, and the excitement was intense. The game became a great struggle of the survival of the fittest,' and Hospital appeared, to be lasting better than- their opponents. It was then that Shore were presented with a goal that nobody regretted more than the Shore supporters. It was unfortunate for Hospital. The whistle blew for the end of the first quarter, and a prominent Shore forward, in the excitement, caused amußement by anticipating matters ana calling for three cheers for Hospital. The last quarter was played in fairly heavy rain, and was full of thrills, but no goals. Hard Team to Beat. Shore, if they reproduce the same form, will give Sunnyside a hard game in the final to-day. Hospital neglected to take advantage of several opportunities to score, and generally the forwards hung too far back; There was also a lack of that good understanding between the halves and forwards that is usually such a feature of their play. The shooting was also erratic, and time and time again passing was indulged in, in the penaljy area, when a good shot would probably have brought results. Porteous played a fine game, and had no chance with the goals against him. They were all at close range, and well placed. Gibb was the best back on the ground, and played probably the best game of his career. He was always cool and resourceful, and stemmed rush after rush, and kicked the wet heavy ball with gr,eat accuracy. He incidentally "souvenired" it when the final whistle blew. He earned it. Thompson played safely, and saved many an ugly situation. Although wandering a little too much from his position, M'Kee was the pick of the halves, and got through a great deal of work. Simon and Bro-vvn have both played better games, and the heavy going did not appear to suit them. The forwards played well individually, but except on occasions did not show the understanding and combination of the opposing forwards. White was unfortunate in being kicked on the head early in the second spell, and had to be carried from the field. He pluckily returned after the wound had been stitched and dressed by a doctor. Ferguson a^id Anderson did not combine as well as usual, and the latter especially played much below form. Lambert did well, until Jones moved Baxter across to watch him, and the more greatly hampered his play. "To Race for Goal." Shore played with more determination than method, and did not bother with any frills, but banged the ball well and hard. They played better cuptie football than Hospital, and were always ready to race for goal. In the forwards, Ces. Dacre was outstanding, and got through an immenso amount of work. Palmer played a good game on the wing, until he was hurt in the closing stages. Woolley, Jay, and Bradshaw made up a fast-moving front line. Tlie two former are youn_, speedj- players, but they frequently spoil good efforts by. getting off-sido. The halves were very sound, and in Jones, Bird, and Baxter the home team were exceptionally well served. Gerrard was the best back, although Colebourne made very few mistakes, while Lipscombe proved very reliable in goal.

The Hospital team was exceptionally

well looked after by officials of the A.F.A. and the North Shore Club. Auckland has a great reputation for hospitality towards visiting teams, and Hospital had the pleasure of enjoying it to the full. They all express appreciation of the many efforts made on their behalf to make the visit a most pleasant one. Other Comment. Commenting on the game, the Auckland "Star" says:—"Shore's winning goal was strenuously disputed, and it was a pity a clearer score did not decide who should contest the final for the coveted Chatham Cup." The Tables Turned. One of the surprises of the season was the defeat of Institute at the hands of Diamonds last Saturday at Kelburn Park. Moreover, Diamonds played only ten men for practically the whole of the- game, as Ballard was forced to leave the field in the first five minutes, suffering from an injured ankle. . The game was played on a heavy ground, but in spite of that it provided bright, clean football, and there was hardly a dull moment from start to finish. Institute started well, but Diamonds were not to be left, and Ballard sent the forwards away, and the ball went out to M'Leod, who sent in a hot shot, which Tarrant saved. These tactics showed that Diamonds were out to win from the start, and put Institute on their mettle. May and Jepson worked Institute down to the goal, but a shot sent in by the former went wide. Jeffery got an opportunity and passed out to Smith, but a chance wag lost when the ball went behind. Each team was striving for an opportunity to score, and the ball was kept moving in approved style. The fortunes of war changed rapidly, but Diamonds got the better of the exchanges, and at last their efforts were successful when Stocks scored. That finished the first spell. . If the first half had been willing, the second was hard, and like the first was full of incident. Diamonds were playing well together, and practically all through had the better of the game. Institute made desperate efforts, but could not get past the Diamonds dafence, and they had a further goal scored against them by M'Leod, who completely beat Tarrant with a fast shot after a fine solo effort. That wa» the end of matters, and Institute had to admit defeat by two goals to nil. Individual Play. Institute's team was up to average strength, but Diamonds had several absentees, and as was stated before, played a man short for nearly the whole of the game. In the first place, Cutler was missing, and hia place in goal was taken by Aspen.' Although it was feared that the absence of Cutler would mean a great deal to Diamonds, anxiety on this score was quickly relieved when, within a short time of the start of play, Aspen had an opportunity of showing his mettle. ' Full justice cannot be done to a man after having seen him play only one game, but there is no doubt that some of Aspen's saves on Saturday were a credit to any first-divi-sion goal-keeper, and to him alone,' a great deal is owing for the Diamonds' success. Diamonds' backs were not the usual pair, and some difficulty was occasioned in filling these positions. Hearne took the right position, and Blair the left. A? usual, Hearne played a very safe game,- and was responr sible for stemming many Institute attacks. Chowan, Auld, and Finlay made up' the half-back line, and the nice understanding-displayed by these men enabled them to send their forwards away continually. Bolt was the right winger, and. M'Leod occupied the corresponding position on the left wing. Both played bright football, were quick to take advantage of opportunities, and were responsible for giving Tarrant a great deal of worry. In the first spell, M'Leod did not play as well as he has clone, and on one or two occasions his shots at goal were weak. In the second half, though, he brightened considerably, and his goal, which was the result of some fine solo work, was well deserved. On the other hand, Institute played a hard^game, but they lacked the dash and understanding shown by their opponents. Tarrant was in goal, and acquitted himself well in spite of the two shots that got past Mm. The second one was.a particularly hard shot, and it is doubtful whether any goalie would have stopped it. The ball was sent in from close up, and was very swift, too. Gill and Bell were the backs, but they found the Diamonds too fast for them, and little could be done in the way of stopping the opposing forwards. Bing, Jeffery, and Exton made up. the half-back line. Jeffery worked nicely, and sent the ball out to his wing man when opportunity offered. He is a very hard worker, and keeps moving with the game..' Of the forwards, May and. Jepson were prominent. They worked together nicely down the line, but somehow or other nearly always lost the ball near the goal, thereby losing opportunities for scoring. Smith, on the opposite wing, did not get the chances that he should have received, and for a great deal of the time was left in the cold. On the whole, the game was quite the best seen at Kelburn for a long time. Interest was well maintained from start to finish, and the manner in which the teams kept the ball mov^g made for a bright, clean game, which was a plea- | sure to watch. Diamonds must be given credit for a good win, which was thoroughly deserved. They demonstrated what may be accomplished even when a team's ranks are thinned, and the members of the side are not playing in their usual positions. Marist Just Win. Marist improved their chances of winning the 1926 championship at the Basin Beserve on Saturday by defeating V.M.C.A. by 3 goals to 2. Although the play was at no stage brilliant, the game was interesting enough and kept 3000 spectators entertained from Beginning to end.' Marist were weakened by the absence of Barton, the right wing, who will not play again this season, and his place was taken by Hickey, who previously has figured aa a goalkeeper. It was evident that Hickey was not particularly happy in his new position, and he appeared to lose himself at times. However, he did' his best to help out his side, and once or twice he did useful work. Marsh' ment was the outstanding player in the Marist forward lirie, and he had th* distinction of performing the "hattrick," getting all three goals. H» proved himself a fine opportunist, and Marist might be well advised to give him a try-out as centre forward. H. Rudolph, who filled the centre forward position, did good work in patches, but on the whole he was a disappointment. Cudby was responsible for much excellent work on the left wing, and was re»ponsible for at least one of the goals scored by Marshment. For a few game* this season Cudby has been off colour, but on Saturday he was right back into his best form, and that is saying a great deal. M'Elligott also played better on Saturday than he has played for a few games. Thomas was very patchy in the centre half position, but Burke and Pope on the wings carried the day

for him. Rudolph and Fitzgerald were in good form at full-back, and G. Fitzgerald did all that was required of him in goal. Of .the T.M.C.A. forwards Worth was one of the outstanding figures, and the day is not very far distant when this player t will be making his appearance in representative company. Dempster also played good football, and distributed the ball with greater freedom than has been the case with this player recently. Trott did his usual solid afternoon's work, but M'Girr did not play quite up to standard. Prince and Boberts, the two fullbacks, were also below form, but Ewing gave glimpses of hia old form and brought off several good saves. "Tennis or Ping Pong." Another version of the Chatham Cup match to given by an Auckland paper. Those who took the Hospital at their paper value and expected a finished display of Soccer must have been greatly disappointed, it states. Whether it was the importance of the occasion, the unsettling nature of the opposition, the ground, or to whatever the visitors chose to attribute their weaknesses, it must be stated that as a combination of rep. players they failed miserably to impress. In the team there were nine of the eleven with big reputations, but it was hard to regard the side as champions of Wellington Soccer. They played right through as individuals and certainly not as a combination. Because of this factor they were nothing more than equal to the Shore defence. Shore on the other hand, by no means an impressive side on reputations, and especially after their impotent display of the. previous week, played as surprisingly well as Hospital was disappointingly weak. The spectators had what they no doubt wanted —a determined struggle for superiority right from start to finish. In the end there was not a unanimous satisfaction with the result. On play it .would be difficult to point to the factor which contributed to the victory of the home side, and there was general regret that in the closing spell Shore had not scored a more worthy goal. There is no good purpose to be served in crying over spilt milk,, and while in the opinion of many a mistake was made in the decision which won and lost the match, the referee has the last word, and all true sportsmen will accept his decision as final, however much they may disagree with it. Otherwise there was nothing to pick between the two elevens. The ground was heavy, and there were many mistakes on the part of the players. If anything, the Shore defence tried moie persistently to get down to a steady, heady game, but in this they were overcome by the long kicking indulged in by the opposition and by I their own forwards. For the first 20 or 30 minutes there was seen the only attempt at concerted action by both teams, 'and when goals were scored in rapid succession the players appeared to settle down to the kick and rush game which is so characteristic of cudtie football. , This was effectively kept up for the remainder of the game, and was what accounted for the rapidity, with- which the play surged from end to end. On one occasion Gerrard and Gibb carried out a real long distance barrage between themselves which resembled nothing so much as a tennis rally or a ping pong bout. Mahagemsnt of the Oame. I read with interest the letters contained in your column of the, 21st, writes Mr. Aleck Smith, and I was hoping that someone in authority would have replied before this, but evidently the powers that be are.not be drawn, and perhaps rightly so. I thought that Mr. Hicks had been too long in harr ness to be caught, but evidently the "cap fitted,' so there you are. The statement that he makes at the conclusion of his letter that some of the members of the N.Z.F.A. are eaten up with, or rather have an exaggerated idea of their importance, is ridiculous on the face of it, for ht knows perfectly well what theso gentlemen have done and are still doing for the game in New Zealand, and it would be a pretty poor prospect for the Soccer code if the work of the council of the N.Z.F.A. during the past few years had been done in a slipshod manner,or left undone. Anyway, I ask what have Mr. Hicks and his club done for Soccer in Wellington possibly a few good games at Porirua, where no one sees them. But what of junior teams, which should be the .backbone of any senior club and without which no club should be allowed to enter the first division! Oneteam clubs are no good to the game in New Zealand and should be prohibited. Further, what have Mr. Hicks and his club done for Association Park, that starved home of the W.F.A., and what have they done for the management of the game generally! Echo in Wellington city answers t What have they done? Now, as to the screed under the nome de ( plume of "Club Ofiicial," methinks it suited the officials of 'the Wellington Football Association very well to see this letter in print. Not one of them was game enough to state that the number of reserved seats at the Canterbury match was less than at the Auckland match when the reserving was done by the W.F.A., and curiously enough "Club Official" did not protest on this occasion, neither apparently does he know that certain officials of the N.Z.F.A. expressed surprise at so many seats being reserved, but on reference to an official of the W.F.A. were told that all would be required. Again, he makes reference to the N.Z.F.A. recouping losses at tfhe expense of the Wellington public. Let me assure him that an enclosure charge is made in the three other centres whenever a big game is on, and I have attended matches in smaller centres when an extra charge of Is 6d has been made. Let me further assure him that all people in that enclosure in the stand against Canterbury paid for the privilege. It is surely a fair-thing that enthusiasts who work for the game should at least have a seat when there is a decent game on. I hold no brief for actions of the members of the N.Z.F.A., rather would criticise any actions harmful to the game, but I am certain that letters like those to which I have made a poor attempt to reply to are no good to the game, and are not even useful criticism. Thia, at any rate, is the general opinion around the Basin Beserve. Two Points. Is it allowable for a player, when taking a corner-kick, to dribble the ball towards the goal instead of kicking direct, as is usually done?—A player may not dribble the leather from a cor-ner-kick, and the kicker is not permitted to play the ball until it has been played by another.' In reference to incidents wherein players argue with a referee over his decision, it would be as well to notice the following: "A player may inquire from a referee as to his decision, but is not entitled by word or action to show dissent."

On the return journey from Auckland, Hospital had much in common with two other teams on the train. Canterbury (League), beaten by Auckland, had not finished explaining how it was done, when Wanganui came aboard at Hamilton, well beaten by South Auckland- in the Brown Shield. It is wonderful how it cheers one up after a thrashing to meet another fellow who has also received one. - '

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Bibliographic details

SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 57, 4 September 1926

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3,601

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 57, 4 September 1926

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