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SOCCER

BY ' VANaUAKOI"

ONE MORE CHANGE

WELLINGTON AGAINST CANTERBURY

WILL LOCAL MEN EEDEEM THEMSELVES?

Members of the Wellington representative team have one' more chance, to redeem themselves. They failed against Auckland and Otago, and local enthusiasts are beginning to wonder if they can redeem themselves by defeating Canterbury at the Basin Reserve next Saturday. The selectors have chosen fifteen men to go into training for the match, and it is the writer's opinion that if a team cannot bo selected from that fifteen to beat the elect of Canterbury, then Wellington Soccer football has fallen on very "■evil days. On this occasion two goalkeepers—Tarrant and Porteous—have been selected for training, and the selectors will bo faced with a difficult task in deciding which one to leave out. On form, "Vanguard" favours Tarrant, whose goal-keeping displays this season have left nothing to be deBircd. Gibb and M'Girr will, no doubt, bo the' full-backs, but the selectors must have some object in view in asking vqteran Ted Taylor to go into training. Brown, M'Kee, Thomas, and Burke are the four halves chosen, and it is probable that Thomas will be asked to step down. The selectors might have done well to include M'Arthur in those for training, as this player has been showing good form in recent matches. Little fault can bo found with the forwards, although the absence of a first-class right winger is to be regretted. Perhaps the selectors will ask Barton, who is now back in Wellington, to fill the position. "Vanguard" thinks that the following eleven should be asked to take the field:—Tarrant; Gibb and M'Girr; Brown, M'Kee, and Burke; M'Blligott, Newman, Lothian, Ballard, Logan. The writer has only taken into account those chosen for training. Thistle Below Form. Until last Saturday, Thistle's chances of winning the Challenge Cup appeared to be very bright, but it was left to Institute to bring about a complete change in the situation. There were few who fancied Institute's chances against Thistle, especially in view of Thistle's fine showing against V.M.C.A., but the unexpected happened and Institute gained a decisive enough victory by three goals to nil. It is true that two of those goals came from penalty kicks, the result _ of handling by Jack, but even so Institute had the upper hand practically all through. The secret of their success lay in the fact that they did not let up in their tackling for one minute, and the Thistle forwards, who'had enjoyed untold liberty on the previous Saturday, found themselves closely watched. The result was that they were unable to get going at all. The game was a triumph for the Institute backs and halves, with Tarrant playing no small part as the last line of resistance. Faulty shooting also let Thistlo down badly, and in this respect Daniells was a notable offender. On several occasions he had great scoring opportunities on the right wing, but each time the ball went astray. Logan also played below form, and Lothian, a3 the result of an injury early in the match, was practically a. passenger until' he had to retire. Taylor did some good work as left fullback, but his partner, Jarfk, in addition to giving away a couple of penalties, miskicked far too often. The Thistle goalkeeper acted unwisely in leaving his goal on several occasions, and generally was disappointing. While by no means brilliant, the Institute forwards worked hard, May particularly getting through an immense amount of work. He was inclined to wander, however, arid almost certain goals were thrown away as a result of his being out of position at critical times. Dawe, played in the centre-forward position, was not altogether a success, and his shooting was very poor. Smith played his usual sound game on the right wing, and crossed the ball very accurately. On the wing, Calvert was responsible for some good work. M'Arthur was the pick of the half- I line, his tackling being sure and his placing good. ■Jeffery, at centre-half, was sound if not brilliant. Gill, who had been playing centre-forward all the season, had a complete change of position, falling back to right fullback, and in his new position he did some good work. He was particularly effective when it came to tackling. Tarrant again did a good afternoon's work, and enhanced the reputation he has earned as-a first-class custodian. A Lucky Win. Marist were very lucky to secure a victory over Waterside on the Basin Eeserve last Saturday ,by the odd goal in five. Prom the beginning, however, Marist made matters willing, and for practically the whole of the first spell l.ept attacking, and giving Cox, the Waterside goalie, plenty of work. Had their shooting been accurate in this portion of the game, they should have had little difficulty in finishing up winners by several goals. But glorious opportunities were lost when goals seemed certain. Waterside, on tho other hand, were very quick to take any advantage that offered, and it was not long before Jenkins got the ball away, and after a fine piece of solo play coni- ■ pletely beat Hickey with a swift shot. Marist were not slow in return, and evened the score through Barton, who shot a penalty goal. Cox got his hands to the ball, but could not hold the leather. For the remainder of the first spell Marist attacked, but could not score. Shortly after the commencement of the second spell, Marist secured a load, Barton again netting tho ball. This advantage was held by Marist till within fifteen minutes o£ time, when a goal was awarded which gave rise to a great deal of dispute among the players, and some of the spectators. Cudby got the ball up to the net, and Cox and ho went down on the ground. During tho mcloe the ball got into the not, and Marist were awarded a goal. The rest of the spell was strenuously contested, Waterside making great efforts to score, and even the game. In this they could not eucceed, and they had to acknowledge defeat by a goal. Waterside can always be depended upon to give a good account of themsolvos, and Saturday's exhibition was no exception to tho rule. Thoy played with vim from start to finish, and in this respect it must be recognised that they have a reputation second to no other senior team. They never let down for a minute, and kept going at

top from start to finish. Their forwards demonstrated again that they are* a nippy lot, and whenever they had an opportunity of pressing home the attack they rarely let it slip. The team played with a nice understanding, and their combined work was neat and sure. Cox played his usual solid game in goal, and thero is no doubt that had it not been for him Watersido would have had more than three goals scored against them. Ho is a versatile goalkeeper, and some of the shots he saved would have surely baffled many another goalkeeper. Horsley and Bolton, though not the usual backs, filled their positions with credit. M'Lellan, Haines, and Irvine, who made up the half-back line, left little to chance. Turner, who was playing in the outside right position, does not usually play thero. He usually occupies a full-back position. On Saturday he played with merit in the forward line, and was responsible foi* strong flank attacks on the Marist goal. Wellwood, Jenkins, Adams, and Thorn made the rest of the forward line. Jenkins, as centre, was always prominent. He showed himßelf to bo a scoring forward, and it was through him that the scoring account was opened. Marist, on the other hand, had the services of Barton, a well-known Wellington representative player. Barton has been away from Wellington so far all this season, but ho will probably be seen playing for Marist for the rest of this year. F. Gamble appeared with H. Eudolph in the full-Back line. Gamble, however, was not playing up to his partner's standard. Of the halves, Thomas (centre) and Burke played solid football. Barton and Cudby were the wingers. The former got on to his game as the match progressed, and centred well. Cudby, on the other hand, was not playing up to his usual standard, and nullified quite a lot of good work by keeping the ball too long. As a consequence the greater number of his centres went behind the net. M'Elligott and Marchment worked nicely with the outside men, but Kallaher did not appear to be very satisfactory at centre.

It was perhaps unfortunate that in an important match such ag this one, on which so much depended,,that there should have been a questionable goal. It was a hard game, though not by any means a brilliant exhibition of the code. Diamonds' Win. Diamonds had a deal more than the mere winning of the match in their game against Young Men at "Wakefield Park last Saturday. If they went down in that match they went, down to B grade, and on paper it looked very much as if they'would go down. However, paper calculations were astray, and Diamonds won the match by a margin of one goal, and, they themselves will admit it, a certain amount of luck. They could scarcely have hoped to defeat Young Men at full strength, even at their best form, and with Young Men rather offcolour, but as it happened, V.M.C.A. fielded only eight of their regular players, Prince, M'Girr, Trott, Pearaon, Worth, Wilkins, Ballard, and Stark. Bwing was a banker; Boberts was also off with an injury, and Dempster was out of town. The playing of three juniors naturally aflected team play considerably, and Diamonds, after the first ten minutes, bucked into it with real enthusiasm, confident of something at least approaching a win, where a good licking had not been at all improbable. . j

Uspfal Wing Play.

Always the pace was fast, both teams throwing the ball, about freely. Diamonds'/ right wing men, Bolt and Eonald '(who, by the way, has been chopped and changed about as to position a good.deal), set away early on a long series of attacks, which always had Young Men's backs thinking. Bolt has not yet m»de any great inroads on a tremendous store of energy. Once again there was a weakness fit centre-forward, but not bo marked as on the previous Saturday. I remarked last week that Auld might possibly fill the bill at centreforward, and though last Saturday he -was not detailed to this position, he can claim to have made the centre very much stronger; *ia game was one of his best for quite a time, keen taeklinc and any amount of bustling, some of It on the heavy side. His one successful shot—for he had quite a few —was first rate; if he could keep the, ball down in that style more often. Diamonds would have a better tally for the season. Hearne had the real misfortune to mis-kick past Cutler, but otherwise his play was pretty Bound. A Representative Wing? On Young Men's side Ballard wag as usual very snappy with his footwork, but sometimes it seems that he is apt to carry the light work too far; in place of juggling he might at times pass on to the next man. He .works in admirably with Stark, bo much so that both might be mentioned to the selectors as a very likely wing for coming big matches. He is on the light side and is a one-foot man, but he has speed, "ginger," and a great eye for centres. \ - Wilkins, at centre, made a successful afternoon of it, largely as a result of good work by the outside men, Worth also dropping some nice centres at the goal-mouth. A Near Thing. Had the game lasted a few more minutes Diamonds' lead might, probably would, have been wiped out, for Young Men during the last five minutes made the pace and were within scoring distance all the time. Diamonds were in worse position also, through W; Ballard being more or less of a passenger with a bad knee, and the team as a whole was apparently feeling the strain of the solid pace maintained. Hearne, Guest, Auld, and Cutler had their work cut out to keep Young Men from sending through, and at this stage these backs cortainly played their beat and hardest football, but, try as they might, they could not get their forwards away to' clear tho danger area. Had Young Men put through another shot the probability is that they would have topped the game off! with another again, for the game was so nicely balanced that one straw would have broken the particular camel's back well and truly. Pitness. It is up to some of Diamonds' players to make a special note about that game, and that is that lack of training by one or two members very nearly cost the club, tho match .and possibly—the point is not even, now at all definite — something more. V.M.C.A. and other clubs, have a habit of biding their time and then jamming on pressure, and the nceessaiy goals to win, in the last few minutes. That almost happened at Wakefield Park. Brooklyn Not So Easy. Hospital had a harder task in disposing of Brooklyn than tho score of 4-0 in their favour would indicate. ( The home team were minus Porteous, Brown, Newman, and Lambert, their places boiiig filled by Murray, Tyson, Eene, and Mullins. Brooklyn were at full strongth, and strained every nerve to down tho leaders, especially in the ear-

lier stages of the game. The visitors relied mainly on. hard: kicking and fast following up to gain them success. They almost succeeded on more than one occasion, but generally this style of play is ineffective against an experienced defence. Hospital, on the other hand, played a steady game and played much better football and so reaped the reward. Hospital scored early in the first spell, but did not again find the net until well on in the second spell. This was mainly due to the fine display by Dobbs, in goal, who caught or turned shots from all directions. Playing the Man. ' The game generally wag a good one to watch, and played with great keenness. The Brooklyn team, however, showed far too much attention to the man, at the expense of the ball. The ball is, or should be, the object of play, and it is bad tactics and consequently bad football to concentrate on tho man. The charging was at times far too heavy and vigorous, and they had to pay the penalty on one occasion in the second half, by having a penalty goal scored against them. Individual Players. Murray, in the home goal, did splendidly, and some of his saves were quite first-class. Gibb and Thompson had a very busy afternoon in repelling fast brcak-aways, and the former especially did fine work. Eene, an old Soccer player, who learnt the game at the Porirua School, played well in the halves in the first and as fullback in the second. Eene has been playing Rugby for some time, but would be a great acquisition to Soccer if playing regularly. M'Kee and Tyson completed the halves and did well in checking tho vigorous rushes of Brooklyn. The forwards, with Anderson in the j centre, combined fairly well, and Anderson's three goals were the result of good understanding. He received a nasty injury to the mouth, cut lips, and loosened teeth, but gamely continued playing. Simon and White made an effective left-wing, -while Ferguson and Mullins combined well on the right.

S. Auton and Browning, at back, were of great assistance to Brooklyn, but were very wild in their kicking. They, however, helped Dobbs in a >fine defensive effort. Bowyer played a splendid game in the halves and "was the most effective player on the city side. The forwards were patchy and relied too much on Eugby methods. W. Auton made a fine leader but did not receive much support from his inside men. He also" had hard luck on more than one occasion with real good shots which, against a less experienced defence, would have brought results. Eobson and Short made the best wing, and with Henry behind theaj were continually giving" trouble. Senior B Games. Some very fine games have been witnessed in the senior B championship this season, and those who have been following the B teams will agree that j the standard of football in that division is well up to that usually expected of senior players. Last Saturday's match between South Wellington and Thistle, played at Association Park, was a fine exhibition of the code, and it is to be regretted that the attendances at the Park are not greater than they are. Naturally, now that the W.F.A. has obtained the use of the Basin Reserve, which is becoming their principal ground, little attention is given to Association Park. From the spectators' point of view thig is quite understandable, for Association Park has little attraction in the way of accommodation and shelter. But little can be achieved in the fostering of the game.if good matches are to be played where they will not be seen. It would be advisable for the executive of the W.F.A. to seriously consider the question of occasionally playing jsenior B games on the Basin Eeserve. Occasionally, when a senior B team fights out a semi-final in a knock-out competition, the public have an opportunity of seeing these teams on the Basin, but otherwise little opportunity is given of witnessing players in this claBS. The standard of football, in the B division is worthy of consideration in this respect. One can recall the admirable display made by, Seatoun against V.M.C.A. in the Chatham Cup competition.

Last Saturday's match between Thistle and South Wellington was a bright exhibition of the code, and in the 'first spell, particularly, the interest of the few spectators who were there was maintained. South Wellington had a comparatively easy win, defeating Thistle by three goals to two, but the j score is not an indication of the game. ! From the beginning, South pressed hard, and they showed that they possess a forward line which is nippy and smart. The passing was accurate, and the combined work of the forwards was good. A great deal of effort, however, was entirely wasted through wild shooting. When near the goal the ball was several times lifted far too high, and cleared the erosa-bar with many yards to'spare. Had the team's shooting been, better, there is no doubt that the score would have been greater. In the first half Eeyling scored from a penalty, and Bolt and Beadle brought the total to 3, In the second part, Thistle showed to much better advantage, and made strenuous efforts to score, but the defence was too sound. They scored twice, once from a penalty,! but could not draw leveL Muddled Arrangements. That this will be Hospital's last attempt to win the Chatham Gup ig almost a certainty. The question of v arranging leave for Manawatu, and if successful, Auckland, was badly muddled between the club and the authorities. The Hospital club were informed that they would be meeting Manawatu at the Basin Beserve today, and that if successful they would meet the Auckland team at Auckland on the 21st inst. The club at once approached their head, and leave wasarranged for those dates, after considerable trouble. A few days later the club was notified that they would have to travel to Pajmerston North for their first match, and if won, they'would 'meet the Auckland team on the 28th inst., a week later. This completely upset all the arrangements made, and at time of writing it is doubtful if they .will be able to get to Auckland. It is to be sincerely hoped that they will be able to do so, but if not, it will not be the fault of the club, or the hospital authorities. There appears one thing certain, and that is, that Hospital's first experience of travelling in Chatham Cup games is likely to be the last.

Sunnyside and Seacliff contest the question as to who will represent the South Island in the Chatham Cup final next month. If Hospital succeed in also reaching the final, it will be an interesting event, as the finalists will both be teams representing Mental Hospitals.

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Bibliographic details

SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 33, 7 August 1926

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3,408

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 33, 7 August 1926

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