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RACING FIXTURES.

JoJy Sl—Chrietchurcli Hunt Club. August 7—Poverty Bay Hunt Club. August 10, 12,' H—Canterbury J.C. August 21—Pakuranca Hunt Club. August 25—Egmont-Wangauui Hunt CUib. August.2B—North Tamuaki Hunt Club. September 1, 2—Marton J.C. September 4—Otago Hunt Club. September 4—Manawatu Hunt Club, September », 11—Wanganui ,T.C. September 15—Daunevirke K.C. September 16—Dannevirke Hunt Club. September 18, 20—Otaki Maori E.C. September 24, 25—Asliburton Couuty R.C. September 24, 25—Napier Park E.C. September 25, 27—Avondale J.C. September 30, October I—Gefaldine K.C. October 2—Hawkea Bay J.C. October 7—Kurow J.C. October 7—Masterton R.C. October 7, 9—Whangarei R.C. October 9— Oaraaru J.C. October 14, 16-^Dunedin J.C. October 18—Carter-ton R.C.

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. •'Wager," Petone.-Tlie late A. Olliver rode the ' Winter Cup winners of 1908. 1909, and 1910, i Tii., Penates, North East, and Nyland.

/'Great acceptances have been received f for the Christchurch Hunt Club's Meeting on Saturday, exceeding if anything the moat sanguine expectations. The "three principal races promise almost as much interest as the big races -which they precede. It would be difficult to find a more attractive card, and those at Riccarton on Saturday -mil be provided with some very interesting racing. Final payments for the two Grand Nationals and Winter Cup and acceptances for the first day's minor events of the C.J.C. Meeting close next Wednesday. Royal Tea is Windbag's galloping companion at Randwick. According to Australian exchanges tiie bookmakers are making Count Cavour one of the favourites for the Metropolitan. The New Zealand Derby winner Runnymede, who was such a big disappointment in the autumn, is beginning to move along fast in preparation for the spring campaign. For some weeks he has been doing long pace work, but on Tuesday of last .week he was allowed to sprint liome at the end o£ his task on tho middle grass nt Victoria Park. After bowling along from the seven furlongs, he clapped on the pace at the three, and ran home that distance in 3S, moving very freely. His ■ trainer, P. Keith, has him in splendid trim. It is probable that a two-year-old parade 1 will'be held at the Pakuranga Hunt Meeting at Ellerelie. Gala Day appears to lie puttiug plenty «f dash into his schooling efforts over the •mall fences at EUerslie. The English mare White Bird is doing goodl work at EUerslie, and is expected by track-watchers to win good races later

A general meeting o£ the National Hunt Committee held recently in England deeided that the rule was to be changed regarding dead-heats, so that -when horses ; ran' a dead-heat for first or any lower place the owners shall divide. Previously it read may divide. Tall Timber is said to be a very unlikely visitor to Riccarton. The journey from Auckland is a long and expensive one, «nd not to be undertaken unless prospects of success are really bright. At a very ■ conservative estimate the cost of taking a horse from Auckland to the Grand • National Meeting would be in the region of £120. Llewellyn is to be raced on the flat at the Pakuranga Hunt Meeting. Nassock is said to have done well after his trip to Trentham, and is sprinting in good style. Sir Roseberry, who has been given a' courge of hill work, is keeping quite sound. He is said to look big and bright. The much-discussed Stormy is commencing to move' along again oh the tracks st Ellerslie. He is expected to prove himself in the early spring, for he is -well forward. Although Sir' Hugh Denison will be leaving shortly to take up his duties as Australian Commissioner to the United States, he will continue to have his colours carried on Australian racecourses. At the last yea.rling sales he made several purchases. One of these was Diorama, a half-brother to Imitation, by Leighton from Gold Printing (sister to •Bon Bord, dam. of Count Cavour), by Boniform from Ormulu (imp.) by Orme. Another was a chestnut half-brother' to King Carnival and Comique. This gelding is by that good performer Ethiopian fby Dark Ronald, sire of Magpie and Bon-in-Law). The dam Orvieto is by iWallsce, and was also a really good performer herself. J. W. Cook has charge of these two coming two-year-olds. Sir Hugh also owns (in conjunction with Mr. M. Denis, formerly part owner of Tookarby) a. Sea Prince colt, who is to race,under the name of Royal Prince. The Caulfield trainer, D. J. Price, has charge of this youngster, who is regarded as highly pro-, raising. Royal Prince was bred by.Mr. 'A. T. Creswick, and is from Queensburgh, a sister to the Melbourne Cup winner-Kingsburgh (by Wallace from [Alexandra, imp., by Persimmon). Sir H.ugh will have cause to feel delighted if his colours are borne as successfully while he; is in America as they were in 1906, when he was in England. That was the ■eason that his colt Poseidon won the Caulfield and Melbourne Cups (a record "double), the A.J.C. Derby, Victorian Derby, A.J.C. and V.R.C. St. Legers. The following shows in marked fashion how costly it is to race in important events in England and how small proportionately is the added money provided by racecourse executives. After tho final forfeit had been paid for this year's Derby the following was the position:— 125 forfeits at 5 soys, £625; 101 at 25 eovg, £2525; 48 at 50 soys, £2400; 31 at 100 soys, £3100; added money, £3000; total, £11,650. Deducting 400 soys for second, 200 soys for third, the winner's entry fee (100 soys), and 500 sovb for the breeder, the race was worth 10,450 soys to,the owner of the winner if the whole of the horses remaining were saddled. At the recent Caulfield Meeting E. A. Connolly had a big plunge on a two-year-old colt Cimon with successful results to himself. It will not be on the score of breeding if Cimon does not fulfil the high expectations formed by some of those who witnessed his success. He belongs to the famous Sappho family. By Woorak, Cimon is from Simmerette, a half-sister to ■the-flying Traquette, and to the Caulfield Guineas, winner Ettefred. Traquette has herself produced a worthy representative i •'in that fine galloper Salatie. ' Simmerette .is by Simmer from Etra Weenie, by Trenton from Nellie, by Tim Whiffler (imp.) from Sappho, by Sir Hercules from Sappho, by Marquis (son of Dover) from A Zohrab mare. Etva "Weenie's other progeny include the V.R.C. Derby and Melbourne Cup winner Merriwee, the Sydney Cup winner Diffidence, "Wigelmar, and Lady Joan, Cimon, who was bred by Mr. John Mills, is engaged in the lA.J.C. and Victoria Derbies, the Caulfield ©Up at 6.7, and the Melbourne Cup at fe.U. Subsequent to his Derby defeat, odds were laid on Colorado for the Rous Memorial Stakes, seven furlongs 166 yards, at 'Ascot. He could only get third in a field of four, Warden of the Marches winning hy three lengths from Bella Minna. It aow seems as if Lord Derby was lucky to win such a good race as the Two Thousand Guineas with Colorado. Coronach, on the other hand, acted right up to his Derby form when he ran at Ascot. Only Lei and Indus opposed him fov the St. James's Palace Stakes, one mile, and he Won by 20 lengths from tho former. Coronach is a late foal, the date of his foaling being 14th April, which is equivalent to 14th' November in the Southern Hemisphere. It is, therefore, not surprising that Coronach is showing himself comparatively better now than earlier in the reason. In- London the broadcasting companies are missing nothing that is of any public interest. On fne night following the English Derby J. Cliilds broadcasted his experience on Coronach in that race. He gaid that during the race lie thought of nothing else but keeping Colorado at bay, but it was not until two furlongs feom home that lie thought he had tho He* won. Cliilds added that Coronach never again be beaten by any of his Derby rivals. If, after the next big

race in Sydney, the rider of (he winner does not arrange with one of the cornpnniee to do n little broadcasting, he is commercially slow, adds "Pilot." The day following the Derby Chi Ids won the Coronation Stakes on Solario, and hail such a serious look on his face when riding back to the weighing yard that some of the spectators called out: "Why don't you smile?'" Childs could not well resist such a request, and did so. Since then Childs has had cause to keep on smiling. There has been agitation in South Africa for a considerable time for (he appointment of stipendiary stewards, but until last month the Jockey Club of South Africa had not taken any steps in that direction. Now there is a move towards giving the system a trial. Applications have been invited for the position of advisory expert for the Transvaal at a salary of £1200 a year. The title given the position suggests that the successful applicant will not have powers equalling those of stipendiary stewards in Australia, but will be restricted to reporting to the stewards of any meeting at which he acts, a similar system to that in New Zealand. A Durban paper says there is no word of any advisory expert for Natal being appointed by the Jockey Club, though the racing public in that State would welcome at least two, if not three.

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Bibliographic details

RACING FIXTURES., Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 25, 29 July 1926

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1,562

RACING FIXTURES. Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 25, 29 July 1926

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