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SOCCER

By ' Vanguard" THE WELLINGTON "REPS."

A CLOSE CONTEST AHEAD

A CLASH OF COMPETITIONS.

Next Saturday Welliugton will be called upon to fulfil her first 1926 engagement in representative Soccer. Auckland will be the opposing side, and the prospects of the meeting between two old rivals in the field of sport are already being keenly discussed. Last season Wellington succeeded in soundly defeating tho Northerners, but this\ear indications point to a closely contested light. The necessity for preparation has not been overlooked by either side, and when the teams take the field at the Basin Reserve on 3rd July players should be ready for the ordeal. The local selectors have already announced the names of the fourteen players from whom Wellington's side will eventually be chosen. Those selected are: Goal, A. Tarrant (Institute); backs, L. M'Girr (V.M.C.A.), Eoberts (V.M.C.A.), and Gibb (Hospital); halves, Thomas (Marist), Burko (Marist), M'Keo (Hospital), and M'Arthur (Institute); forwards,, Cudby (Marist), M'EUigott (Marist), Ballard (V.M.C.A.), Lothian (Thistle), Logan (Thistle), and Anderson, (Hospital). Of these players, Gibb, Thomas, M'Girr, Burke, M'Kee, Cudby, M'Arthur, M'EUigott, and Lothian played, against Auckland last year. Tarrant, Logan, and Ballard have also represented Wellington at some time, and Newman and Eoberts both havo representative experience. In deciding to rely on experienced players, the selectors have acted wisely, and their choice generally is a very h*appy one, although, no doubt, it will give rise to feelings of dissatisfaction in some quarters. There are many, for instance, who incline to the opinion that Lothian has not justified his inclusion on this.years form, and tho claims of Newman (Hospital) to the centre-forward position have been advanced. There is no denying the fact that Lothian has not yet shown anything like last year's form, but when ou his game there are few better forwards in New Zealand than the Thistle man. It must be admitted, however, that Lothian is lucky to be with the elect, and by the same token Newman is unlucky to be overlooked. There can be no complaint about the selection of the other forwards. Cudby was a foregone conclusion for, the Jeft wing position, and with Ballard alongside him he should shine to an even greater extent than was the case last season. Anderson is a dashing inside right, and M'EUigott has earned his place, although it is unfortunate that it will bo necessary for him to play out of position. Had Nicolle been available for the outside right position, it is probable that M'EUigott would have gone inside. Logan has also earned his selection, and it is just possible that when the final team 'is announced „he will be found occupying the centre forward position, in placo of Lothian. Four halves have been selected, and it is going to be an extremely difficult matter to drop one of them. M'Kee has earned the right to the centre position, and Burke is sure of the lefthalf position. Thomas has been playing great football this year, and it will bo a difficult matter to drop him, especially in view of his suitability as captain of the side. It may be found necessary to ask M'Arthur to drop out, and give Thomas the right-half position. M' Girr and Gibb will' probably be the final selection for the full-back positions, although on form Roberts is quite worthy of a place. Tarrant has no rivals for the job of goal-keeper, and in deciding to rely on the Institute custodian the selectors have acted wisely. League Games Take a Back Seat. The case for the team which is not at the top was put to "Vanguard" by an old supporter of the game this week. The Management Committee may not agree with his views, but without a doubt many players will, and though it is too late in the season to rearrange things this year, the ground for complaint, if the Management Committee considers there is real cause, may be removed next season. Originally the Chatham Cup competition was played at the end of the season, he remarked, but it now obtrudes itself before the season is half-way through", for, as things worked out, played at the end of the season the Chatham Cup games interfered and clashed with Charity Cup games. Last year, therefore, Chatham and Charity Cup games were worked in about the middle of the club competitions, very effectively killing interest in those latter competitions far too early, as fixtures had to bo manipulated to bring the semi-final and finals rounds teams together. From the point of view of the W.F.A. and of the successful teams, !■ he continued, that was all right, but it was not much good to the teams not at the top of the ladder; to them it was distinctly discouraging. The same thing was happening this year, only it was happening rather earlier, and those teams which had not entered for the Chatham Cup were finding themselves side4rackcd to out-of-the-way grounds as of no importance in the season's football. If the W.F.A. was going to continue inviting clubs to enter the club competitions and was going to accept their subscriptions then it should endeavour to sustain interest in that competition. If it did not intend to do so, it should say frankly: , "Half-way through the season the leading teams are going to be withdrawn and you other chaps will bo left to play the round among yourselves. " As things were at present, he concluded, once a team went down it had no chance of regaining position, for tho simple reason that it was sidetracked, but surely an opportunity should be given even tho last team on tho ladder to finish up tho competition in a proper way. The W.F.A. was hardly encouraging the very teams that needed encouragement when it drew up a season's fixtures and then pulled them all to pieces during the second round. An Easy Win. The Hospital-Waterside match did not rouse a great deal of enthusiasm. The form of the latter team was a great disappointment to their followers, who fully expected, if not a win, at least a close go. Thuy were justified in their hopes, as on the previous meeting this season' Hospital only won 3-2. Waterside have been considerably strengthened since then, and really should have done much better than to have such a heavy, defeat in-

Iflicted upon them. The game itself was actually much more closely contested than the scores would indicate, although the home team always seemed to have a little in hand. There was almost a complete lack of understanding in the Waterside team, and the absence of combination nullified their efforts. On many occasions the ball was kicked direct to an opponent after perhaps a good piece of play, and repeatedly were their passes intercepted by the Hospital defence. As individuals, the players showed up well, but generally, as a team, they failed in many important features of the game. The Hospital defence, after their rude awakening of the previous week,, played a fine game, and again demonstrated that the strength of this team is mainly in the rearguard. Porteous did not have a great deal to do, although saving one or two good shots. The backs kicked surely, and showed a capital understanding. The team has three exceptional halves in Brown, M'Kee, and Simon, and they proved too old in the head for their opponents. They play a most consistent game, and the success of the forwards is mainly due to their efforts. The star of the forward lino was Newman —in fact, he was the outstanding forward of both sides. He is undoubtedly a great shot, and besides scoring four goals, he only narrowly missed on several occasions in -obtaining more. He is an opportunist, who shoots with either foot, and what makes it more difficult for the opposing goalie, is that the shot is nearly always a "first timer." "White ably assisted Newman in worrying the visitors' defence, and' is improving with every match. Lambert, who was well bandaged after his recent accident, played well on the left wing, but the right wing did poorly, and felt the absence of Anderson. Cox had little, if any, chance with five of the goals scored against him, but it seemed as if-he should have saved the one scored by Lambert. He, however, had a strenuous time, and did well to keep the tally down. Turner and Bolton had a busy afternoon, and they played no small part in keeping the home score down in the second half. The halves played a defensive game, and usually kicked too hard to assist their own forwards. Haines played a nice game, but gave Newman far too much rope, although the latter is an elusive player. The best wing was Parle and Gilbertson, and they were responsible tor many nice runs, but the forwards, as a whole, were scratchy. The material is there for a team, and a good one, but they must work up an understanding as a team to get the best results. The Chatham Cup. There have been some distinctly good games in the preliminary rounds of the Chatham Cup this season, and this knock-out competition has relieved the tedium of the League games, and given the public some bright football. But the best is yet to come. Last Saturday's game, when V.M.C.A. defeated Seatoun, was full of bright incidents, and the display put up by Seatoun made Young Men fight hard for a while. After to-day's matches between Y.M.C.A. and Marist, and Thistle and Hospital, it is expected that the finalists will be Hospital and Marist. If this ife so, tho public may be assured of one of the best games of Soccer yet seen this season. Hospital and Marist are old rivals, and whenever they meet a clean game of football results. They have met onco this season in the League championship, when they drew, neither side scoring, and if they have to play off to decide who shall represent Wellington, it may be taken for granted that the game will be well worth seeing. Hospital, of course, will have to come into town, and the match in all probability will be played on the Basin Eeserve. V.M.C.A., the present holders of the cup, and the- first club to bring it to Wellington, are not the Young Men of last season. They miss Campbell badly, and early this season Nicolle ,was put out of action with a serious injury. If the final is played between Marist and Hospital, it seems likely that the odds must go in-favour of Hospital, who have a good record. The Chatham Cup, it will be remembered, was donated by the ship's crew of H.M.S. Chatham when tr-.t vessel was on the New Zealand station, to promote club football in New Zealand. The club that wins it can we'll say that they are the best Club in the Dominion. A Bright Game. It is rarely that spectators are treated to such a good display of football as /that which was given by V.M.C.A. and Seatoun in the second round of the Chatham Cup competition on Saturday. Some complaint has ifeen made this season of the dull football that has been seen in some of the first division games. This to a certain extent was justified, but nobody had reason to complain of the game on No. 2 ground at the Basin Reserve last week. Seatoun are well up on the first division B championship ladder,1 and their opponents occupy a similar position in the A championship. It was anticipated that the game would be willing, but the display given by Seatoun in the early stages was, to say the least, surprising. ' They probably made an error, though, in establishing such a fast pace in the first spell, for as the game proceeded V.M.C.A., who had held themselves in, had much more in reserve, and practically did what they liked with the ball, running up seven goals to Seatoun'3 two. For the first twenty minutes or so Seatoun forced play in a manner which looked very dangerous for Young Men. If ever the suburban team intended to win, it was, at this" stage that they should have secured a lead, but it was mainly owing to the good defence of Ewing that they could not score. Play was- nearly all tho time in the vicinity of Young Men's goal, and with the opportunities they had Seatoun deserved tc score. They were extremely unlucky when a hot shot of Telford's struck the upright and bounced back into play. Later in the game a similar shot was sent in by Stark, but his hit the correct side of the post and bounced into tho net. In the first few minutes Smythe, Seatoun's outsideleft, made a good attempt at goal, but Ewing was too experienced to be caught napping. Shortly after, a freekick gave Seatoun a chance, and there were some anxious moments when the ball was dangerously around the goal, but again Ewing came to the relief of his side. Again the Seatoun forward? bustled Ewing, and another free-kick was given the suburban team; but, as before, tho Y.M. goalie proved safe and cleared his side. Then V.M.C.A. got a chance, and pretty passing which started with Stark kept the. Seatoun goalie busy. Telford, Seatoun's out-side-right, got an opportunity, and after a fine run sent in a shot which nearly found the net. That was the last of Seatoun, and from then on Young Men had the game in hand. A corner kick taken by Stark enabled M'Girr to head in the ball, and almost immediately after the kick off Ballard scored with a pass he had received from Worth. At half-time V.M.C.A. were two goals to the good. The second spell, like the first, was fast and open, but Young Men demonstrated their superiority in a marked manner and added five goals. Dempster scored a pretty goal early in tho spell, wh*en he ran from halfway and sent in a shot which Wyatt could not

hold. Stark received a long pass from Worth and scored with a hot pross-iihot. Orr found the' net twice, and Dempster scored with a goal similar to his first. Seatoun scored twice. Telford beat Ewing in a scramble in front of the goal, and Murie's individualistic play enabled him.to put one shot behind Ewing. Seafoun never ceased to battle all the time, and though they were beaten long before the final whistle blew, played the game right to the finish. They had to acknowledge defeat to a team which was superior to them in all departments of the game. Individual Performers. Quite the best part of Seatoun was the forward line—Telford, Kinder, Murie, M'Kenzie, and Smythe. Both Telford and Smythe showed that they were fast wingers, and worried Ewing quite a lot. Smythe played good football in the first spell, but was inclined tq hang on to the ball too long, and by doing so lost the opportunities he had made. On one occasion particularly he ! fumbled with the ball for quite an ap- I preciable time right in front of the goal, with the result that it was taken from him and he lost to his side a golden opportunity. He is fast, and some of his shots at goal were distinctly good. Telford is very fast, and shoots accurately. He was most unlucky not to score in the first spell when his shot struck the upright. Murie is a worker, and the goal he scored was well deserved. The Seatoun men swung the ball about a great deal, and kept the game interesting. Wyatt, in goal, acquitted himself with merit. It is safe to say that but for his good play Young Men's score would have at least been nine instead of seven. He is a promising goalkeeper. -s. On the other side Ewing played well in goal. In the first spell he was kept busy quite a lot, and as in the case of the other goalie, his fine performance kept the score down. Prince was safe in the back line, and played well up to standard. M'Girr was at h6me in the half-line and worked well. Dempster, as usual, played a good game. Two of his goals were spectacular, and he was always ready to make the best of an opportunity. Ballard and Stark worked well. The latter took a long pass from Worth, and made no mistake with the ball, sending it into ths net with a great deal of pace. Petone Extend Marist. People who were not at Kelburn Park last Saturday would have been considerably surprised had Marist gone down to Petone, but those who saw the game would not have been surprised at all, for the fact was that, contrary to expectations, Petone extended Marist fairly thoroughly, and anything might have happened during the last few minutes of the second spell or during the first minutes of the extra time played. Summed up very briefly, the position was this: Marist's forwards made a poor showing when near goal, and Potone's halves and backs put up a rattling defence, added to which the whole team showed at times great speed and fine understanding. Petone's outstanding forward was Paterson, late of Waterside, on the left wing. His opening goal was one of his own style, all the way. on his own. When he gets through with his solo work, well and good, but good solo play is not necessarily good team play. He could have worked in rather better with Pincock than he did, but his cen- ■ tiing was quite good, better than his taking of corner kicks, which was too fine as a rule. Kinmond and Hamilton made bustling play at centre, a change after the almost invariable style of this season's wing attacking. Pincock was prominent in patches, and scored a nice goal from Brislee 's pass. Newlands had not touch to do on the right wing, the halves feeding generally to the centre and left, and his inside was not as a rule counting him in. Sutcliffe and Stobbs concerned themselves chiefly with defence, and were well backed up by Hunter and Ingham, and by M'Vean, between the posts. ": He brought off some great saves. Marist, as stated above, lacked power to finish when near goal, Petone's defence jamming them down to the corner flag time after time. M'Elligott was a bright light, and Burke was a very tricky player throughout the game. He certainly is a warrior for work, and on Saturday was very sure, though occasionally still playing too far back. Thomas did not show up greatly, but his work was there all the same. No Nets Again. Again (or perhaps "still" would be the better word) there were no nets at'Kelburn Park, and possibly the Management Committee does not intend to place nets there. Sooner" or later there will be an argument about a goal that was a goal, or was not, and unpleasantremarks will be passed. Apart from that probability, the bare posts look cheap. I understand that four new sets of nets were ordered from England some time ago. Plenty of. Boom on the Roof. Several sports grounds about the city have no dressing accommodation, but that cannot be said of Wakefield Park. It has a dressing-room, quite a wellknown dressing-room, moreover. Unfortunately, it is not a particularly good dressing-room, with which sentiment members of the City Council probably agree. Just how many players and their togs this place is supposed to accommodate I do not know, but I do know that last Saturday approximately 200 managed to pile in, and pile up somehow. The place is badly ventilated, and worse lit, and if there is a scramble before play starts it is a detail to the froe and for all when players start looking 'for things after their games. If there is not too much room inside (which is putting it very mildly) there is some outside, and there is nothing else for it but outside. If it is still too light for that the lavatory serves as au overflow dressing-room, which may or may not be in accord with what is considered a fair thing. Last Saturday the position was so bad that there was talk of turning the main road into a more comfortable and quite as decent dressing space by way of registering a protest, but it was dpcided wiser not to do so. The City Council certainly knows, about this dressing shed, but it does not worry over it—not a'bit. As in rush-hour trams, there is plenty of room on the roof. A Goal-Getter. "The remarkable goal-scoring of "Geordie" Newman, of the Hospital Club, is worrying the W.F.A. selectors, and one hears that they, and several of the "heads," will be at Porirua this afternoon to have another look at this player,'' writes a correspondent.'' New- ' man is not. in the fourteen selected to go into training for the final selection, or was ho in the twenty-two selected "for the trial game. Yet he has scored nineteen goals to date! He is a most unselfish player, passing the ball well, and playing for his team. There are many who consider that Newman is not a centre-forward, but he is cer-. tainly making a very good show in the position for his club, and has also play-, ed in that position for some time on the Coast, being selected from there to play as centre-forward in the Test match against the Chinese at Christchurch. He has certainly had some experience of the duties of a centre-for-ward. '' In the semi-finals for the English Cup the net gate receipts are pooled; the F.A. takes one-third and the balance is shared between the four clubs. In the final each party takes one-third. The original F.A. Cup was stolen from a shop window in Birmingham in 1895, when Aston Villa were the holders. _... ._. .. .

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Bibliographic details

SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 151, 26 June 1926

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3,658

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 151, 26 June 1926

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