Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Turf Notes

(BY "VEDETTE.")/

RACING FIXTURES.

.Tune 7— Auck'.timl R.C. Winter. June 18, ..-Napier Park R.C. Winter. June 23—Hawkes Bay Hunt Meeting. June 25, 2C—Hawkes Bay J.C. Winter.

"Novices' luck" is almost a byword in games of chance, and in the case of Mr. J. A. Macfarlane, the owner of Landbird, it haß' been exemplified. At a little social gathering at Ellerslie subsequent to Landbird's victory in the Great Northern Hurdle Race, Mr. Macfarlane admitted himself to be a novice at the game. Landbird carried his colours for the first time in the Wanganui Steeplechase of last year, and won handsomely. Then followed a frown of fortune, for Landbird ricked himself in his box and had to be put by for a season. He made his reappearance about a month ago at Hastings, and finished third in a hurdle race. Next came his third in the Wanganui Steeplechase, when he cave auything but a reassuring display. Evidently that race and the schooling since had done him a power of good, for he scored handsomely on Thursday. Landbird thus, for his novice owner, has yet to finish out of the money. J. H. Jefferd, his former owner, must now regret parting with him. Ellerslie-trained horses fared badly on the opening day of the Auckland Meeting, Brushwood Boy being the only winner. The winners of the divisions of the Jervois Handicap, Bowman and Titaness, hail from Whangarei, Landbird from Hastings, Degage aud Nadarino from Trentham, and Pendennis and Hypothesis from the Waikato. Cureaform stripped just a little pretty for. the Great Northern Hurdles, but she dashed down the straight in her preliminary in great style.. It will be very surprising if she fails to pay a dividend before the meeting closes. Llwellyn fulfils all the promise he bestowed last year, and properly handled should be the jumper of the last decade ,| or two.: He has the Bize and substance, .. and is good with it. A. M'Donald rode l him well in the Great Northern Hurdles ' on Thursday, and always had him nicely placed so long as his condition lasted. In the end Llewellyn was not knocked about, and he will see a better day soon, Lucullent looked big and burly when sent out'for the Great Northern Hurdles. Although he made no showing, he should be about ready when the time comes to gallop through the mud at Trentham next month. Archibald is not seasoned enough yet to win Great Northerns,- but he shaped very well on Thursday for a comparative novice. R. E. Thomson, who rode Gaze in the Century Hurdles at Wanganui, went near io carrying off the Northern on Kawini. Kawini made up a good ileal of ground over the last mile, and then bungled the last fence, losing a good winning chancei It is not said that he. would have beaten Landbird, but he would have extended him. Little Dick is usually tailed off in his races, but on Thursday he was always fairly handy, and when he tipped out was actually one of the leading bunch. His fall was purely accidental, as he slipped into the fence and tripped over it. Degage hag always been recognised on this page as absolutely first class, but a Cornwall Handicap with 10.1 and mud to her knees seemed too big a task. She not only rose superior to it, however, but waltzed away from the opposition over the last bit. She could have been one of the bargains in horseflesh, for when early in her three-year-old career a cash offer of £500 would have bought her. Since then she has won about ten times that amount in stake money. Lord Star ran a great race in the Cornwall Handicap, and it was no , disgrace to be beaten by a mare like Degage. Unless his appearance was deceiving, Lord Star should strip an even better horse next time out. Passionate showed last year that he was a good mudlark. In the Cornwall Handicap he was one who whipped in the field for a great part of the journey, but he was going on well close up behind the placed horses at. the end. He should be one with a mark against his name from now oh. The safety number at the six furlong barrier at Ellerslie is 26, but 27 horses were started in the Merrlbers' Handicap on Thursday. It is safe to say that 17 at least had no chance from the rise of the barrier, while from the stands it appeared as if the starter had a great difficulty to pack them all in. This ail enhanced the value of Nadarino's performance, for he was drawn 24 at the barrier, but as there was some delay, he might have come.in a little. The inside horses did not gain an especial advantage, as the barrier positions of those prominent to the distance shows, viz., Kingfield (16), Dobbin (4), Hoariri (9), Nadarino (21), and Ned Kelly (11). • Pelham was very much on his toes before the start of the Members' Handicap at Ellerslie on Thursday, and finally at barrier rise did not get out well, and was always in the ruck. J. M. Buchanan started Serang, Gold Fern, Merry Damon, and Chairman in the Members' Handicap, but not one got into a place. Pavo did a very dashing preliminary before the Members' Handicap nt Ellerslie on" Thursday, but was not sighted in the race. He looks as if he wight come back on the soft tracks. Rowley does not appear to be able to go with his field in the early stages of his races nowadays. The strong gallops he is receiving are fining him down nicely, and he should soon notch a winning bracket. The groan that went up when Kendal fell in the Hack Steeplechase at Ellerslie 'on Thursday must almost have been heard in the city. He was locked on as the giltedged investment of the day. but treacherous ground on the take-off side of the fence brought about his downfall. S. Henderson was riding him well, cutting off all the corners and saving every inch of the ground. Thursby and Norma Talmadgo were a pair of hacks to take the eve in the second division of the Jervois Handicap. Norma Talmadgo showed a good deal of pace, but drifted out of the picture in the straight. Thursby, on the contrary, was running on strongly at the end after being well back for six furlongs. Backers' of Brushwood Boy received a wonderful price when he scored in the Penrose Hurdles at Ellerslie. Some idea seemed current that the hurdles at Wanganui are flimsy, and he was passed by.on that account. The hurdles at Wanganui may not be as formidable as the obstacles jn the open hurdle races at Ellerslie, but they are certainly more substantial than the light brushed hurdles used for the hack and hunters' event on the Northern course. In the race Brushwood Boy did not look like getting beaten. A substantial rise of 161b did not stop Ecuador from winning again at Wingatui on Thursday. He has been a good horse to follow at the Duuedin Meeting, being .at a very lucrative price each start. Lord Woolavington, by the success of Coronach on Wednesday, has thus won two Derbies inside four years, a feat of which to be proud when it is considered that some owners have spent a lifetime and then failed to win the coveted blue ribbon of the Turf. Coronach, the winner, was beaten into third place in the Two Thousand Guineas by Colorado, who could finish only third in the Derby. Like Captain Cuttle, Lord AVoolavington's previous winner, Coronach is by Hurry On — Wet Kiss. The dam of Coronach is by Tredennis from Soligena by Soliman, sire of Solferino, from St. Guntheirn, by Carbine. Last year Coronach and Legatee headed the free handicap with 9 stone, Colorado being assessed at 8.6. Judging by the photographs, Coronach is no beautj% but handsome is as handsome does, and he has delivered the goods. His trainer, Fred Darling, scored last year with Mauna, an especially striking performance for so comparatively young a trainer. Last year Coronach opened his career by winning a Maiden Plate in which there were 22 runners. Then at Goodwood he won the Rous Memorial Stakes, and .the Champagne Stakes at Doncastcr. Then came a surprise defeat by Lex in the Mf die Park Stakes, this being his last appearance as a two-year-old. ' Although North Island racegoers would be surprised that Charlatan won at Wingatui on Thursday, it is pleasant to read that this liorse has at last made good. The success should give him confidence for races later in the year. The calibre of the pair who finished behind him on

Thursday, Pamplona and Tigerland, adds to the value of Charlatan's performance. The total of the eight winning dividends at Ellerslie on Thursday was £11" 3s, there jbeing three of over double-figure • dimensions. Bowman's return was of more than half the grand total. Gentlemen. riders are not over-plentiful, in New Zealand, aud it is seldom that amateurs take part in jumping races. Mr. F. A. Baker, however, the owner and trainer of Hypothesis, rode that gelding when he won the Hunt Club Hurdles at Ellerslie on Thursday. Note is under offer to an Australian buyer, and it is possible that the two-year-old Paper Money filly will race next at the pony meetings. Nadarino owed his success on tho first day at Ellerslie to his ability to begin smartly. He shot out of the' barrier better than Ballymoy 11. and Merry Damon, both usually brilliant beginners. One of the remits to the Racing Conference this year is nn omendruent of the rules to fine clubs who fail to adhere to the safety number in races the sum of 50 soys, and such club shall be liable to | have its certificate of registration cancelled. There is the usual superabundance of remits to be discussed at the annual Racing Conference next month, numbering in all 65. One or two of them seem of importance, and one in particular may engender a good deal of heat. It has been sent in by the Auckland Racing Club. In addition to Landbird, V. H. Colello has Fireblight in his stable. Fireblight is a different type of 'chaser to Landbird, but when the real chasing is commenced on the Riccarton course Fireblight will [ come into her own. Meantime her trainer I reports that she is doing very well. Mr. J. Bull's old favourite, Ngata. is reported none the worse for his efforts at Wanganui, and.likely to bo a much better horse when next seen out. Erie's leg filled badly after her race in the Great Northern Hurdles, and early yesterday morning it looked ' any odds ! against her starting again at the meeting. Continual treatment yesterday had worked a marked improvement, but at a late hour last night she was still a long way from being right. A final decision as to whether she would run in the big steeplechase to-day was to have been decided this morning.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19260605.2.141

Bibliographic details

Turf Notes, Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 133, 5 June 1926

Word Count
1,849

Turf Notes Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 133, 5 June 1926

Working