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LATE HON. T. W. HISLOP

REFERENCES AT APPEAL COURT

TRIBUTES FROM BENCH AND BAR.

At the opening of the Wellington sessions of the Court of Appeal this morning, before his Honour the Chief Justice (Sir Robert Stout) and their Honours Mr. Justice Sim, Mr. Justice Heed, Mr. Justice Adams, and Mr. Justice Ostler, feeling references were made by the Chief Justice on behalf of the Bench and by the Attorney-General (the Hon. Sir Francis Bell) on behalf of the Bar to the death of the late Hon. T. W. Hislop, M.L.C. Amoug those also present were Sir John Findlay, K.C., and- Messrs. A. Gray, K.C., C. P. Skerrett, K.C., M. Myers, K.C., A. do B. Brandon, T. F. Martin, R. Kennedy, 11. F. yon Haast, "\Y. Perry, C. A. L. Troadwell, G. U. "Watson, W. G. Riddell. S.M;, D. U. A Cooper, S.M., 11. F. 6'Leary, M. F. Luckie, Prendeville (Crown Law Office). 11. E. Evans, J. S. Hanna, W. A. Hawkins (secretary to the Wellington Law Society).

ATTORNEY-GENERAL'S TRIBUTE.

Sir Francis Bell, who spoke under stress of emotion, craved' leave of the Court to speak of a late comrade and friend, the late Mr. Hislop, who was, he believed, the senior member, by date of call, of the profession of law in New Zealand. He was called to the Bar in the same year as his Honour the Chief Justice, and the early days of his friendship 'were spent in the good school of Ota^o, and in the office of a very honoured member of the legal profession, long since deceased, Mr. Hackett. For. all those years since 1871, with the exception of the thre years of his tenure of office as a Minister of the Crown, and the recent two or three years aftei his retirement, the late Mr. Hislop carried on the active practice of the law, and maintained throughout the honourable tradition they had inherited. Mr. Hislop was not famed as a great advo efite, but in^ the town where he firsi practised, Oamarn, an-d in the City of Wellington, where he settled after his departure from Parliament, he was greatly respected, not only by his fellowpractitioners, but by his fellow-towns-men and citizens. He had that quiet, temperate, and forceful mode of address which was the true emphasis of forensic speech or legal argument. Turning from that brief record of the late Mr. HisJop's professional career, which they best remembered, he would remind his brethren of the Bar and the members of the Court that there was another and an active side to-his life. '

DISTINGUISHED PUBLIC CAREER.

His public career was distinguished above that of most of those in the profession of the law. He was three timea elected to the Parliament of: New Zealand by the town in which he .first settled in practice (Oamaru), and until Ida death he was one of three survivors of the Parliament of 1876, the first after th'j abolition of the provinces, the other two being his Honour the Chief Justice and another member of the legal'profession, Mr. do Lautour. He was by far the senior member of the Parliament,, as a member of which he,died. He-became aMinister of the Crown in 1887, and, to his great pleasure, was' Minister of Education, thus following in the footsteps of his father, who was llio author of the Education Act in New Zealand. The late Mr. Hislop's eminence in educationalpolitics was recognised not only in New Zealand but abroad ; rind ho was awarded from France the distinction of the Legion of Honour, not for services to .franco but in recognition of his services to education generally. After tho defeat of tho Government of which ho was a member, he came to Wellington; and not unnaturally, in view of •''his long almost historical past, ho joined the senior firm, the oldest firm established bore, Mr. Brandon's firm, and remained with it till ho "gave iip active legal work. During that time his fellow-citizen." elected him four times Mayor of thip city, and at last he was called to the Legislative- Council and spent his last dr.ys again in tho service of his country. It was . not without some pridp that they sought to record tho life history of a man who. though an aeLivp member oi the profession, had served the public in so many important capacities, and had been chosen by his own people, the people among whom lie lived, or, each occasion for marked distinction in their service. SCHOOLFELLOWS. He (Sir Francis Bell) in what he had said was speaking for all of them, but he might be pardoned if he added one word for himself. He and the Into Mr. llislop were schoolfellows, taught upon the self-same hill, and had been lifelong friends; and ho was filled as ho spoke with the remembrance that Mr. Hit-lop's-last words, spoKen on the day when the "fatal seizure came in the Legislative Council, were spoken in reference to himself, and tho last, farewell between them had been in remembrance of those words of his. Sir Francis sincerely tha.nkcd their Honours for the opportunity to speak of the strong links which bound them all. to tho' memory of an honourable and distinguished "servant, and comrades and friend. THE CHIEF JUSTICE. Sir Robert titout said that ho wished ■!"•) add a few words ou behalf of the Bench in regard lo the death of one o( the oldest members of tho Bar. Of course, ho had been admitted to the Bar some months before the late Mr. Hislop, and there, were other still older .members of the B.nr. Mr. D'Aroy Hachett was admitted in 1855, with Mr. Perry, of Tima.ru. Personally he hud known the late Mr. Hislop ever since the latter attained the age of fourteen J years. He was a student at the High School, and he (Sir llobort Stout) had known him intimately over since. When lie started practice in Oamaru he was associated with the firm to 'which he (Sir Itobcrt) belonged. It was true that tho late Mr. Hislop was not much given to advocacy, but he was recognised as a sound lawyer and a capabTe business man, and did exceedingly well, r.ot only in Oamaru but in Wellington. Ho had Tendered great public service; lie had attained a great age, and his career was one upon which his family could look-back with pleasure and pride, and feel that he had kept the name of Hislop well to the fore, as his father and hi? grandfather had done before fiim. He (the Chief Justice) hail known fiv-p generations of the Hislop family, having known tho gnindfalher of the late Mr. Hislop, and had' known (he family as out! that had produced many men* arid women who were good citizens and did what they could to help nur civilisation and our people; and he hoped anrl believed- that the snn of their deceased friend, already well known at, the Bar, would long be spared to follow worthily in their footsteps.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

LATE HON. T. W. HISLOP, Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 84, 6 October 1925

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1,169

LATE HON. T. W. HISLOP Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 84, 6 October 1925

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