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SOCCER

[BY "VANGUARD"!

George Campbell and Neil H'Arthur, two of the best known players in Wellington—George Campbell the beat known player in New Zealand —have given it out that the present season will be their last in Association football. Both have done much for Soccer and, even though they may not appear in shorts and football boots next season, they will no'doubt continue the good work in helping on the younger fry. More than one senior player to-day definitely retired from the game two or three seasons ago, but like the old war-horse, ■came again into the fuay. On the other hand fine players, good sports, have given it out that they had done with football, and done it has been,' for neither aa coaches, as referees, seldom even as bankers, have they shown up on Soccer grounds again—family chores, the garden patch and so on and so on have apparently loft no time to spare. It is well that-the old hands carry on so staunohly, for the .players alone cannot carry on and carry forward the game of football, or any other game, the coach, the referee, the linesman, the man who handles the arrangement of grounds and fixtures, are as indispensable if the game is to prosper. , George Campbell is a native of Glasgow, a brother of R. G. Campbell, known to all who know the history of tho Glasgow Hangers. He went first to Dunedjji on coming to New Zealand, and soon made himself known in football circles in that town. On several occasions he represented Otago, and made his first appearanoa on the football field in Wellington in 1910, when an Otago representative team was defeated by the Wellington eleven on the Basin Reserve by 3 goals to 1. After a period of war service he returned to New Zealand and came on to Wellington, joining up with Thistle, whom ha captained for several seasons, before joining up with Y.M.O.A. in 1923. Ha played his first representative match for Wellington on 10th July, 1920, and since- that time has represented Wellington and New Zealand in most of tho big games that were going. Campbell made a name for himself with the Australians during their visit to New Zealand in 1923, and added to that name during the tour of the New Zealand team through Australia in the following year. He was elected captain for the tour as a whole, and, of course, captained each game in which ho took part. Mr. Alf. Williams, in commenting on Campbell's play_ has said: "As a captain he is the ideal player, ■ and I doubt whether Wellington has ever had a better. To' my mind tho nearest approach to him was Phil Roots', but, after' all, there has been little to choose between the two great players. Playing in the forward line, he has played centre forward many times, but, undoubtedly, .his p_roper place is at inside left, and in this position he has no rival. He is able to combine his play with anyone, but in this respect his best work has been done in the company of Charlie Ballard, and it is not, saying too much to rank these two players as the finest wingers who have ever played' in Wellington. He is a great opportunist . . . and as a tactician on the field there is none better. Great player as he is, he would be even a greater one wera he able to use both feet; he is a left-footer, and it is really astonishing how he puts himself in position when about to take a shot at goal. During the Australian tour he scored 13 goals out of the 33 scored by his side, and in the last Tests played (1923) he put up a wonderful record by scoring seven goals obtained by New Zealand, this being one of the greatest ■ performances accomplished by any player." In all, George Campbell has played In something like twenty representative matches since coming to Wellington In 1920: Auckland 6, v. Canterbury 2, v. Poverty Bay 1, v. South Island 2, v. Wanganui 1, v. Australia 6, v. Hood and Repulse 2, v. Chinese University 2, v. Wellington (New Zealand team tryout at Pahnerston North, August, 1924). Through All Grades. Nail M'Arthur has played fop »everal clubs during his football career in Wellington, doing good service. as a young j player for Institute. In 1922 he played! for Hospital, but later in the season] transferred to Thistle. As all will re-T member there was a big shuffle round, | and the 1923 season found him playing with Young Men, in company he had known under the blue jerseys. He is a player who has worked his way through all grades of the various competitions. Ha is a hard worker, keen, good on the attack, places the ball well to his forwards, and has treated his football as something worth training for. His first appearance as. a representative player was in 1912, when he played for Wellington schools against Marlborough schools, and in 1913 he continued his school football, and also played in * few games for the fifth division reps. His first senior representative came in 1919, when he was picked to play against Wanganui in a Brown Shield game. In 1920 and 1921 he played in all three games, North Island v.'South, but owing to illness ho did not play for | Wellington against the Australians, though he was a member of the New Zealand team which beat the visiting Australians in the third Test at Auckland. Ho was also a member of the New Zealand team which went over to Austraba in 1923, but was handicapped right through by an injury to his anldo sustained prior to leaving Wellington. Apart from his junior representative matches, some of the chief games in which he has taken part since 1919 arc: |v. Canterbury 3, v . Auckland 5, v. Wa"S'inui 2, v. Poverty Bay 1, v. H.M.b. Renown 1, v . South Island 3, v. Country 1, and Chinese University and Australian matches. Australia Outclassed, I " Many doubts" and misapprehensions j have been removed from the minds of players, officials, and the publio by tho Comma&wealtU tour Qi tha. Ungliib, FopU

THE USUAL BASIN WEATHER REVIEW OF ENGLISH TOUR CAMPBELL AND M'ARTHUR RETIRING

ball Association team, now aboard the Osterley Bailing home," writes A.J.B. in sn interesting article in the Sydney "Referee." The tour has proved beyond all possible doubt that our playing standanl is.a long way- below first-class. How can Australia improve her Soccer and bring it into line with that of most other countries? It i 3 a problem legislators will need to tackle, for the publio, having seen the best, lias had its appetite whetted, and will demand something better than has been served up in the past. Before the Englishmen arrived all manner of opinions were expressed among Soccer men regarding the tourists' prospects. For instance, over in New Zealand a few months ago I met George Campbell, the Dominion captain, and had to listen to' the genial Scot while he told me we "would not have a dog's chance." The team had not then sailed from England; the personnel had not been announced; but Campbell reckoned a y gulf separated our standard from that of any side the F.A. might send. He had led teams against Australia apd seen the best football overseas. Mr. Steve Stack, tho N.S.W.F.A. treasurer, held quite a different view. He'told me at Wentworth Park we would " have it on the English pros, for speed and initiative." He had seen first-class English football, so was not talking in tho dark. Many other men concurred in this opinion, whilst, on tho other end, equally sound judges predicted English victories all along the line. However, everybody had his own decided opinion as to what would happen, and one listened to them until he gave up speculating what 'would really happen. Then came the day when the tourists made their bow in Perth (W,A.). I, was at the practice of Eastern Suburbs Club at Waverley Oval the same evening, and shall never forget the shock we received when news came through from Perth that the Englishmen had won 8-0. 'If they do that fortyeight hours after disembarkation, what will happen to us a month hence?' asked a player."

After reviewing the tour in some detail, A.J.B. proceeds: "In order to appreciate what the tourists accomplished, the following facts must be digested:— They won 25 matches without defeat, scored 139 goals against 13, travelled 6000 miles in Australia, played on grounds of all descriptions, lived, slept, and ate for three months at various hotels, attended practically every social affair arranged in their honour, and did not do a minute's training 1 Of their eighteen players as many as five were on the injured list at tha same time. In what respects were the play and tactics of the Englishmen superior to ours ? ' Hardy, in goal, caught the ball cleanly and punted more than 60 yards up the field. He was only of slight physiquo, yet he could kick a dead ball 50 to 60 yards. Perfect balance was the secret. He was given plenty of room in which to work, and not on one single occasion, as ' far as I remember, did an Englishman kick or head through his own goal. The backs played one in front of the other, never kicked into touch -when they could avoid it, kept the ball low, and ( sent it back to the goalie to clear when nothing else was possible. Both had a splendid understanding with the halves in front of them. The backs marked the wing forwards, and the three halves the three inside men. Every one of the defenders was adept at heading a ball. The halves acted as forwards when England was attacking. None of them kicked the ball until he got it under control, and tho pass was invariably along the ground. Each had a few tricks, which enabled him to work into position and draw an opponent before parting with tho ball. '

" Footballers learnt scores of things from the English team they did not Icnow before; they witnessed a good many moves beyond the powers of tho many, but any man who studied their tactics, and could appreciate their skill, must be beneficial. I understand the C.F.A. will consider how best Australia can bring her playing standard up to No. 1 class. Some men favour bringing coaches out, as was done by the oricketers years ago. Others say coaches cannot teach men who cannot learn; but I they could teach the schoolboys. If the I authorities cannot afford oversea coaches I it would be wise to detail a few really 1 good local players to instruct schoolboys how to play the game. Many of our seniors could never be taught. They will "kick the ball where they are j looking " until they retire. The O.F.A. needs an office of its own and a broad Australian outlook. The ground question will need to be taokled. The public have • paid £19,500 to see the Englishmen, so no longer shall we hear people say, " There's no money in Soccer." A prominent Sydney officiaj said when tho J English tour was mooted, "We will j never be able to pay for it." Happily, 1 Messrs. Lukeman (C.P.A. secretary), ; Storey, Stack, Hildreth (Q.), and a few others did not listen to him. The money I is here so long as we can deliver the goods. Every season public support will : grow. Thousands of new Soccer players aro being turned out of the schools; their parentß, elder brothers, and sisters will support the games, and nearly every new arrival is a Soccer barracker. The first Soccer international between the U.S.A. and Canada was played recently, and now practically every country in the world has embraced the game. It is up to our officials to be thinking hard about the future. Several of our. players displayed promising form against the Englishmen, but I am of opinion that we must look to the juniors for our teams. The majority of the seniors aro past tuition. Many who played against the Englishmen should retire and make room for better talent." Young Men in the Final. In spilo of the fact that they were without tho services of Nicol and Atkinson, both of whom went down with pneumonia, Y.M.O.A. managed to win a place in the final of the Chatham Cup n,t Auckland last Saturday, {defeating

the Ponsonby team by 2 goals to 1. They had to play Cohen, who has not I made an appearance recently, and Worth, of the B division, who took Nicol's place on the right-wingj Injuries also added to the difficulties of Young Men j Eton was practically a passenger almost right from the commencement, and Ballard also received a" bad knock early in the game and was brought in to the centre-forward position. All the goals were scored in the first spell, each side sending a shot through within seven minutes of the first whistle. The deciding goal was scored by George Campbell about midway through the opening spelL During practically tha whole of the second half Young Men had their work cut out to hold Ponsonby out, for the Auckland forwards' greatly improved their attack and made the going fast and willing. Bentley, in goal, made several remarkably good saves, and generally put in a strenuous time, his work being made harder as neither Prince nor M'Girr played up to form. M'Qirr, particularly, had an off day, the heavy ground possibly putting him off his game. Trott and M'Arthur did good work In the half-line, but with the exception of Campbell and Ballard— handicapped as he was by his injury— the forwards were rather disappointing. Worth apparently found the occasion too big for him, and did not play up to club form. Dempster played a fair game, and his goal early in the match was one right- out of the bag. The Ponsonby forwards lost golden opportunities in the second spell by relying on left-wing work, when much better results could have been obtained on the right, as the V.M.C.A. defence on that side of tho field was weaker. Had Ponsonby given more attention to right-wing football the great probability is that they would have been in the, final for the cup. Neesham, at centrehalf, the captain of the Ponsonby team, did not play anything like the fine football he showed In the recent Brown Shield match, and the other halves were also rather weak., Craxton, in goal, brought off some good saves, but his play snowed that he has lost some of the dash and accuracy which earned him representative honours a few seasons ago. A Drawn Gams. The team representing Wellington, which met the Royal Navy on the Basin Reserve last Saturday afternoon,- had anything but an enviable time. In the first place the Basin was totally unfit for football. The recent rains had made tho ground exceptionally soft, and this, combined with the fact that foothold was very slippery—if not dangerous— that the ball was greasy and heavy, made matters difficult for both, teams. When the sides met previous^, Wellington managed to snatch a victory with tha margin of one goal, and although the Navy men wars looked upon as worthy opponents, it was not anticipated that this time the home side would experience any great difficulty in winning. However, the reverse was the case, as ■Wellington very soon found out. Bright from the commencement the Navy made things willing, and at half-time were leading by the very satisfactory margin of 3 goals to 1. Wellington appeared to be taken by surprise, and could not get into their stride. The Navy showed good combination. The forwards and halves were nippy^ but the real strength of tho Navy was in tha backs, who played a very sure game. Time and again the Wellington forwards, who were playing a very nice game, got up to the Navy goal, but the backs were too good for the home side, and -usually Wellington's attacks fizzled out. The only goal scored for Wellington in the first spell was by Lothian, who netted a beautiful centre. The Navy pressed up to the time the whistle blew for half-time. In the second spell, Wellington commenced woll, and opened with a strong attack. Before the Navy realised what had happened Wellington had geored two goals, mainly by the aid of Lothian, and excitement was high when the scores were even. Then the Navy added a point, and not long afterwards Wellington retaliated, and again brought the scores levoL Wellington commenced to press, and after a series of attacks netted the ball. With a lead of one goal, and pnly a short time to run, it was anticipated that the game would conclude in Wellington's favour, but on the contrary there was a sensational ending. M'Crae, who had been playing a splendid game for tho Navy at centrehalf, triea a long shot, and, to the dolight of the spectators, netted the ball. A few seconds later the whistle blew with tha score 5-5. It was a hard game, strongly contested, and several alight injuries were received by players during the match. Hearne, however, was not so fortunate as his clubmates, and had to retire shortly before tha end of the first gpell with a nasty cut over his eyebrow. Refusing a Penalty. ' Some pointed remarks on players refusing to take penalties were made by air. A. E. Wells, a well-known Wellington referee, in a letter to the Management Committee of the W.F.A. this week. Mr. Wella stated i "As a vicepresident of your association and one. who is naturally concerned in the welfare of the game, I was disgusted to read •of an instance which occurred in last Saturday's match, H.M.S. Dunedin v. Wellington. I refer to the deliberate miskicking by a Wellington player of a penalty awarded by the referee in all good faith. _ As this is the second instance of this sort of thing occurring in a representativo match in Wellington, I think it's about timo that players should be taught that they are not only selected to play the game of fooball, but are also J expected to uphold the honour and dig- : nity of Wellington, and tho beet traditions of football generally, and anything introduced- of a farcical nature for the p-lorification of a particular individual should not be tolerated. It seems to me that prominent players in particular are always ready and willing to put 'themselves onsido with the crowd, and. deliberately insult a man who gives his time and service in the interesfe of the game. I respectfully suggest that it is the duty of your committee in this instance to pointedly draw the attention of the offending player to his utter lack of true sportsmanship. In mv opinion there is very little difference fn the offence of a player, who in the heat of the moment commits an offence against the referee, and the ono who deliberately and openly insults before a crowd of people a man who is not in the position of protecting himself. I feel sure that if some steps are not taken by controlling bodies .to stop this sort of thing, the referees would bo quite justified in leaving the ground when sufficient cause occurred, and always in refusing to act at all in matches where players endeavour to gain a little cheap popularity at their expense." This letter was left •with the secretary { to deal with, j

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Bibliographic details

SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 52, 29 August 1925

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3,271

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 52, 29 August 1925

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