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SOCCER

lev "VANGUARD"!

■ENIOE A. , „

Interest is now quickening 4n the competition for the Chatham Cup, and with the semi-finals near at hand the, teams to take part in the final at Wellington nest month should shortly be known. The local representatives, V.M.C.A., made another step towards the final at the Basin Reserve last Saturday, when they accounted —and very easily at that—for the R.S.A. eleven from Palmerston. North. The losers did not prove to bo a very striking advertisement for Association football in the Manawatu, as V.M.C.A. were permitted to win as Eh.oy liked. In the first Bpell the visitors certainly made a fight of it, but they faded out completely in the second. V.M.C.A. played good football in the second spell, and if they maintain their present form they should meet with further success before the competition closes.

Considerable interest attached to the match between Seacliff and tfomads at Christchuroh last Saturday. The Dunedin team registered a good win by two goals to nil, and they will take their place in the Cup final at Wellington. Referring to the match, the Christchurch "Sun" states: '-'For the visitors, Hooper, -who fills the centre-forward position, is undoubtedly a player of class; ha is very fast on the ball and opens up tho game with skill and judgment. Simmonda occupied the insideright position, and was conspicuous for his bright display of clever footwork. This player does not make the mistake of wasting time in useless fancy play, and his. one object was to get the ball as near the goal as promptly as possible.' Baillie exhibited a good turn of speed on the left wing, and was responsible for several good runs; he places the ball accurately, and has evidently paid special attention to the scoring possibilities of corner-kicksj as theso were put in with fine judgment. Cooper's tall figure at centre-half caught the eye when the Light Blues took up their positions, and he gave one of the be3t exhibitions of centre-half play so far seen on the ground this season. Ho indulged in no pretty work that did not have for its object the transferring of the ball to ono of his forwards in a good scoring position, and His prompt placings contrasted sharply with that useless dallying with the ball so painfully evident in the work of the Nomads' halves. Waugh and Murray were the two supporting halves, and they both played useful games. Anderson, at right-back, has a well-deserved reputation in this position, and it is unfortunate that the injury which he received in the first five minutes' play should have handicapped him for the remainder of the game, as the Christchurch public were unable to see him at his best. Gwillam had no really difficult shots to deal with, but he gives th% impression that it would have to be a good shot to get past him. Nomads' forwards were disappointing. Handicapped by a lack of accurate passes from their halves,- and worried by a resolute and determined defence, they had an unenviable time \ of it, but even in spite of these extenuating circumstances their work was bad. The wingers, Purvis and Chapman, were not impressive; the latter did not appear to be able to lift the ball to centre accurately, and his shots were wild. Jim M'Dougall, as centre-forward, put in some good individual work, but he failed to open up the game sufficiently. At inside-left Colin M'Dougall was too prone to indulge in pretty footwork, and in common with the rest of the forwards ho should cultivate a more direct style of play, as delay always enables the opposition to rally round. The halves were good tacklers, but were, on the whole, inclined to hang on too long, and their placing was weak. Graham did not play up ib his usual standard, and in the opening stages was not very sure, but ho improved as the game progressed. Flood tackled vigorously, but would do better to adopt a style of tackling that does not leave him to such disadvantage when beaten. Jackson, in goal, let two through, but with these he had no chance. He played a thoroughly safe game, and on one occasion ho effected a great save by rushing out and deflecting from Hooper's feet.'" A Hard Game. Marist and Waterside played a hard game at' Kelbum Park last Saturday, and it is no exaggeration to state that Marist had to play up to the top of their form to win. It was a surprising game, for the reason that Waterside, who so far have not had a win in this season's competition, demonstrated that in future they are not to be treated lightly. Had they maintained the pace they commenced with, and kept tho pressure up on tho Marist goal, probably they .would have won.' Rut Marist were in the best of form and condition, and every niiin wan physical ■ ly fit. WuUn'aidor.s started well, and i iittacki'il light up till tho whistle blow at liiilf-timc, wlu'ii nn scorn hnd been registered. JJrilli forwards and halves played excellently, the forwards in

particular showing that they made a combination'which was not to be treated with contempt. They were very quick, eager to make openings, and battled hard all the time. Both teams played much the same style of football, and there, wore no dull moments in the game. ITp till hnlf-tiinr. Waterside had control of tlio play, ami although they Hhowcrl up In .■iilvunliigc and forced tho game, they tliil not display tin? finished work anil the samr- niimunl of skill in

•■on.lrolli«g the' Wl Uih!- Mcirfol rM, This Viiw wusi ucitke»t4e when they

CHATHAM CUP

V.M.C.A. IN SEMI-FINAL

SEACLIFF SUCCESSFUL IN THE SOUTH

lINIOI B.

pressed down on the Marist goal, when their attacks usually ended lamely. They lacked experience, and were unable to carry an attaok to a successful end by scoring. Then, of course, there was the Marist defence to be reckoned with. It was very sound, and seldom did Waterside press through. Marist's first score came suddenly when, a few minutes after the commencement of tha second spell, .Cox was bustled in goal and Pope found the net. Watersiders kept pressing gamely, but could not Btand up to the more finished work of Marist, and as the result of combined work between Barton and Oudby, Pope again scored. Watersides tired towards the finish, and Marist's total was brought up to three, when Pope again scored. Cox played a great game in goal for Waterside, and brought off several good saves. Scottish Wanderers v. Diamond!. From rather scrappy play during the first fifteen minutes or so at Association Park last Saturday, Scottish Wanderers and Diamonds at length settled down to fast and interesting football, with the advantage not ao much in favour of Wanderers as the final score of 4 goal* to nil would suggest. Diamonds showed out particularly well upon the left wing, Stocks and R. M'Leod, with Bidgood behind them in the half line to send them away frequently. Bidgood. apparently, turned out at very short notice and. forgot his togs. These wing men worked at a great old pace, and M'Leod centred well, though in Jack he had a lively and energetic oack to beat. There is little doubt that Diamonds' most useful' movement, as far as appearances go, at any rate, is this wing attack, with a smart cross to the far wing or in to centre, and it was not till they adopted this plan that they threatened Kirkland's goal seriously. As' a matter of fact, they did not get through with it, but they at least set the pace ; The right wingers fJ. M'Leod and Daniells) also moved in lively fashion, but did not finish their movements, generally speaking, as did R. M'Leod and Stocks. Dickensen did not appear at his best by any means. Reyling did good work at centre-half, and Bolt, at his right, was generally where therj was work to do. There was a good deal of comment [ upon the line as to the undue weight which was thrown.into play time after time by one Diamond player. A coupl* of seasons ago "/anguard " took up the question of pl>/inj the man instead of the ball f>?fly strongly, and, though perhaps -Ke should not say so himself, hadxOme little part in influencing those wkb control Soccer matches to have such unattractive and very often dangerous incidents cut out altogether. I would not say that the player referred to went too far, within the strict reading of tha rules, but he certainly erred on the side of weight. ' In several matches lately one has noticed a tendency for the heavy stuff—quite legitimate, it must be granted, but not in the least attractive or helpful to the bettering and popularising ! of the game—to be introduced again by certain players; possibly referees might think back again to the recommendations made by the local management after the last controversy upon the subject. Though Wanderers showed remark- i ably good football about midfield, halves and forwards working together splendidly, they frequently showed hesitation or just that necessary lack of punch before goal, which perhaps suggests again what has been stressed in theso column* previously, that the real strength of j this cloven lies in the half-back line; they are tho players' with the real punch, who rattle the leather on to their forwards and keep them moving. That is not to say that Wanderers' forwards played a half-hearted game; they certainly did not, but they did not show up in goal-mouth work as they did in midfield play. Lothian had bad luck in straining his knee again, but was able to resume in- a few minutes. He was unfortunate in running against hard knocks time and time again during the game. Moug kept up his average, opening the afternoon's tally and playing good wing football. Galbrsith had on his best shooting boots, and from one series of attacks sent in three great shots, but did not manage to send through. Houston had bad luck with his attempts, one, from three or four yards, going west for a poster, and another from hardly more than a foot or so in some remarkable way missing an empty goal. "Pep" Lacking. Thistle took advantage of their chances, or at least some of them, while Hospital quite failed with their opportunities to score, except once. That briefly describes the meeting of these two teams at Porirua last week. Tha shooting of both aides was weak, with Hospital worse than their opponents. The game was not a very interesting one to watch, and appeared moro in the natures of a practice match. There was a tack of keenness anil "pep" in the play, especially by the home team, that was probably due to the position of the teams in the league table. Hospital opened strongly and quite outpjayed their opponents in the • earlier stages of the game, but Thistle improved as the game progressed; and during most of the second spell were the superior team. Tn the winners' forward lino Logan wns tho outstanding player, smd it is lim-d to understand his omission from the Brown Shield te.'im. He is fast- and clever, with a good shot in cither foot, and scored two fiur- goals in this mat Hi. Bi'tMvtil?s >vn« 14 » J/w fjip #/i tjut«id»

his knowledge of the game, he would play a good game in any position. H» has not the speed of the average win# player, but he knows his football, and ■.could give many of them a lesson in the art of manipulating the ball. Crundwell and Paterson aIBO playod well on the left wing, and were ably supported by Bing. Cordner' and Taylor did an immense amount of work at back, and the latter is still a hard proposition. M'Yean was a little uncertain hi goal; at one time brilliant, and then quite the reverse. The Hospital forwards generally were weak, and missed far too many chances. At times they -would carry all before them with fine play, and then fail miserably when a little concentration or steadiness in frost of goal would have brought result*. Scheali Ftitball. School football will reoeiv* a big fillip later on this month, when the annual interproyincial tournament will be held in Wellington. There is every pro»pect of seven—perhaps eight—teams taking part, and the indications ar« that play will be of a keen order. The tourney will take the best pnrt of *. wink, and during their stay in Wellington the boys will be billeted at various homes. This will not mean that the tourney will not cost money, and it ia therefore very refreshing to find that the local association is taking a keen interest in the matter. At the meeting the other week that very keen enthusiast for boys' football, Mr. S. H. Ferguson, placed plans for the running of the tournament bofore the committee, and it must have Been very gratifying for him to' find such a ready desire to assist on the part of members. The question of providing suitable forms of entertainment for the boys was considered, and it was decided to hold a social evening at tho conclusion of the tourney, one of the main items on the programme to be the presentation of the shield to the winning j team. This is all very satisfactory, but one cannot but express regret that the N.Z.F.A. has not taken a keener interest in the tourney, which is of a Dominion character, and which, more than anything else, will have the effect of placing the game in Wellington on a strong foundation. Football in the schools should receive every possible encouragement, and although it must be admitted that the council has done much in the way of supplying football* free of charge, it is to be regretted that more interest is not shown in the tourney. Some little time ago a decision was reached by the council that Mr. Ferguson should be invited to attend meeting* of the council whenever boys'' football was discussed. So far Mr. Ferguson has not received an invitation to attend. Is this to be taken as an .indication that the council has not discussed football in the schools. Let us hope not. Dlitlnetly "Off." Some comment was made recently in these notes arising out of a discussion at a meeting of the W.F.A. as to whether a player, who had ben ordered off the field could play again before being dealt with by the local controlling body. Members of the W.F.A. were divided in their opinion, and the chairman commented on the fact that there ■ was no rule on the matter. At this week's meeting of the council of the New Zealand Football Association, the matter was brought up by Mr. Hyder, who said that he thought if a player was ordered off the field he should not be allowed to play till he had been dealt with. His view -was supported generally, and the council decided that as some doubt seemed to exist as to what course of action should be followed, it would give a ruling to the effect that when a player was ordered off the field he should not play again till he had been dealt wrth by the local controlling . body. The council further recommended to local associations that his case be considered before the next playing Saturday. Her* and There. Mr, J. Lewis, who is in charge of the F.A. team in Australia, is anxious to get the players back to England at the earliest possible moment, in order that they may be available for their clubs. He has asked the permission of the International Selection Committed to travel overland from Toulon, and consent has been given. Tho spin of the coin in football is a great gamble. It does not always work out fairly. Take the experience of Bury last season. They won the toss eighteen times and lost it on twenty-four occasions, and the bulk of their points were earned from games in which the spin of the coin favoured them. A lucky penny is indeed worth its weight in gold. In tho last three seasons the oSurnley F.C. have lost about £18,000. Last season they lost £4604. As a result, j tho credit balance which in 1920-&1— their championship season—stood at' £24,534, is now reduced to £4845, and! there is a sum of £8711 owing to the bank. Finances at Horns. The popularity of football is strikingly demonstrated in the annual balancesheet of the English Football Association, which has just been issued. It shows assets to the value of £70,441, including investments amouuting to £62,240, in addition to which there ia a sum of £5346 on current account at the bank. The chief source of revenue is, of course, the cup ties, which brought in £15,057. Of this sum £5313 was received from the final tie at Wembley and £1064 and £582 from the semifinals at Chelsea and Nottingham. The total expenditure on th& general account was £15,475, the expenses of the council being £3000 and of the, committee £2180. Salaries, wages, and auditors' fees cost £2299, and the trophies presented to the Australian F.A., the South African F.A., the Dominion of Canada F.A., and the New Zealand F.A. £551, while a sum of £23 appears under the head of grants to associations. There was a surplus on the season's working of £2669, but a small deficiency of £129 oil the international match account. Tho match with Ireland at Everton broujht in £1208, and that with Belgium, at West Bromwich, £300, the expenses being £173 and £436 respectively. The receipts at tho two g:imes with South Africa at Southampton and Tottenham amounted to £568 and the expenditure was £1061. The amateur trial and the game with Wales realised £407, against which, with the match against , Ireland ■ the expenses amounted to £466. The income from dividends and interest was £2018. and there are many people who are firmly and logically convinced that the F.A. ought io do moro to help county associations foster the game in their- midst. Others, too. with the balance-sheets showing what they, do, feel that the professional clubs ought not' to have ihci>- lakjngs in the competition proper for Mm V.A, Qup milked to tk» «itent Uiqy uuw tit.

P. V. D. 1. For. A«. Pti, P.M.C.A U J!I 38 18 18 Karlit 11 7 3 1 84 10 17 Joßpital U 6 2 9 87 17 14 rhletle 10 6 S 2 25 17 13 ). Wanderers ID 4 3 4 20 22 11 Diamonds 12 4 1 7 2780 9 Institute 12 2 4 8 20 U 8 (Vatereide 12 o 012 13^ 01 0

P. W. D. 1. For. Ag. Pti. r.M.O.A, "C" ..,*.., IS 12 0 1 68 12 24 Brooklyn 12 10 11 51 12 '21 rohnsonvills IS 10 0 S 49 211 20 ieatoun IS 8 1 4 88 17 17 ?etona 18 flo 7 28 si 12 IT.M.C.A. "B" 13 6 0 7 28 28 12 Diamonds 13 S 010 12 42 6 tVelgasco 13 2 Oil 14 85 4 !wlft3 11 0 0.14 5 54 0

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SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 34, 8 August 1925

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3,203

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 34, 8 August 1925

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