Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

RACING FIXTURES.

August I—Christchurch Hunt Club. August I—Poverty Bay Hunt Club. ■ Augus, 11, 18, 15—Canterbury J.C. August 15—Pakuranga Hunt Club. August 20, 22—'Wellington. Racing Club. August 29—North Taranaki Hunt Club. September 2, 3—Marton J.C. . September s—OUgo Hunt Club. September s—Jlanawatu Hunt Club. September 10, 12—Wanganul J.C. September IS—Dannevlrke K.C. September 17—Dannevirke Hunt Club. September 18, 19—Ashburton County E.C. September 19, 21-Otaki Maori R.C. September 24, 25—Geraldine It.C. September 26—.Vapler Park R.C. September 20, 23—Avondalo J.O.

To-day sees the end of the 1924-25 racing season so far as actual fixtures are concerned.- The season ends next Friday, so that next • week's fixture* both on Saturday, the Christchurch and Poverty Bay Hunt Clubs, open the new season. Incidentally, Saturday next is the official birthday for all horses foaled south of the Equator.

Passin' Through and Erie, both trained in Taranaki, were the only two of the Grand National acceptors concerning whom news was wanted. . Now it is known that they have gone on to Riccarton fit and well. With regard to the remaining fifteen, there is no doubt, if reports received are correct, that they are training on satisfactorily. The Winter Cup is being voted on all sides a very difficult race to sum up. (Not Sun Up, though fit and well he would have to be seriously ' considered). Kilfano and White Comet are most favoured of those weighted at 10.0 and upwards, while further down Killocra is actual favourite, and there are admirers of Moorland, Beaumont, and Rehutai. In this very difficult race there are still the claims to be recognised of Pompey, Kuhio, An■ticipate, Warhaven, 'Irish, Serene, and The Cheat. It is full early yet to make any more definite announcement. Vagabond and Boomerday are the prime picks in the big hurdle race, while Nukumai, Frisco Mail, En Route, and Penury Rose are not without friends. Sir Roseberry would advance very considerably in the market if his ownertrainer were to reserve him for the hurdle race. It will be agreed that, the big double at Riccarton is an almost impossible achievement for one horse, and, moreover, a horse who contests the steeplechase prejudices very considerably his chance in the hurdle race. Sir Roseberry is a good horse without doubt, but no matter whether he wins the steeplechase or not, if he is a runner, and completes the course, and then is equal to .winning the hurdle race, he will have to be recognised as a superspecimen of horseflesh. From now on clubs will be giving owners the opportunity of sprinting the coming season's two-year-olds between races. These events are always brimful of interest, and are appreciated to the full by the public. The charge if continually levelled at the Canterbury Jockey Club of being slow to move, but in respect to two-year-old parades it has set an excellent 1 example. At the last Grand National Meeting the two-year-oldß were sprinted on the concluding day, and they were described in the race-book with full detail, th« same as the candidates in actual race* The club's patrons were able to identify all the youngsters without any trouble, and the innovation was most favourably commented upon. It is suggested thatNorth Island clubs interested could follow this good lead. Some of the horses running at* the Gatwick «Meeting in England recently were given queer names at their christening, comments a London writer. In the first race one of the animals ran under the cognomen Jam To-morrow. This was too much of a handicap, of course, and the poor beast was tailed off, on which an alleged wit suggested that the name should be changed to Cat's Meat To-morrow. Pancake is rather out of season, but a gelding so called won, so hia backers did not bother about his name. I Hope So, the name of another competitor somehow suggested pessimism, but this horse certainly managed to run into the first three, which is more than can be said of Clean Baby, Far Nicer, Canhego, and Papa Blinks, other of the day's aspiring and perspiring contestants. The Auckland Racing Club is to be congratulated on its move in lengthening all hack races to a mile or more. At" the same time, in fairness to _ clubs in other parts of New Zealand, it has to be pointed out that there is almost a surfeit of very mediocre horses in and around Auckland, and the clubs of the Northern town are assured of big.fields in hack races,. no matter whether the distance is five furlongs or up to ten furlongs. Elsewhere, however, horses are not so plentiful, nnd the greatest difficulty would be found by many clubs in other parts to obtain even fair fields if all hack races were a mile and upwards. Northern critics in handing bouquets to the Auckland Racing Club have overlooked this fact. They may twist it round into another 'argument for the supremacy of the Queen City of the North in everything, but it remains an incontrovertible fact. It is worthy of note perhaps that practically all Sir Roseberry's recent schcoliu" at Ellcrslie has been over hurdles. A number of rising two-year-olds were sprinted at Bllerslio last Saturday. 'J.'ho Royal Soult—Eliza colt led Royal Ten (by Tea Tray—Duchess Kudorus) and Subdivision (by Surveyor—Juanna) over two furlongs in 26 4-ssec. Tho Catmint —Loloma colt was slightly in advance of tho Nassau—Cassock colt at the conclusion of two furlongs in 26 3-ssec. The rising three-year-old Nucleus has grown and lengthened appreciably since winning the Nursery Handicap at Avoni dale in tbe autumn, writes "Archer." ! Her form was promising-, and she may be •seen to arlvanta^'.: at distances up to a niiln in (ho now season.

Mcrrv Piimon is repoiied to hn-Ve wintered well, ;i»rl is mnking good progress in his work, at Ellcrslic. There is no doubt that he was one of the best two-year-olds of this season. Manna was bentcn by his 101b penalty in the Ascot Derby, and although he made a brave showing, he could finish only a close third to Solario and Sparus. 150i.1i the winner and rnnnci-up ate by Gainsborough. On the same day Saucy Sue cantered away with the Coronation Strikes with 9.10 'up.

This season's two-year-old fillies nre comparing well will) the coil.?, by the recent performances of Delia Minna and Aloy.sin. His Majesty's filly Aluysin pleased psiddock critics when saddled for thu Queen Mary Stakes at Ascot, says the "Sporting Life." The daughter of Lemberg is a sensible filly, with a handsome frame, quality being stamped on her everywhere.- She is a bay with black points, and is ,-is good in front of the saddle as she is behind, lior square quarters giving the impression of strength mid great, \rvrmzr. Nntliin^ was quil'koi- lo liu'J liw ;'uu]iaii r thua

she was, and being clear of her rivals in the first furlong, Childs took tho wise course of edging away to the left. Moti Mahal threw out a determined ohallenge close home, but Aloysia answered well and gamely. Aloysia is the granddaughter of Vain Air, who won a race at Kempton Park, and was the late King Edward's last winner. The success of the King's filly and the name of the race made a remarkable coincidence.

S. Donoghue and his aeroplane travelling obtains an abundance of publicity in "the English exchanges. It is now learned that M. Paul Wertheimer, for whom Donoghue rides a good deal in France, has presented the crack jockey with an aeroplane. Further advices were to the effect that the 'plane was entered for the King's Cup of the Royal Aero Club, which was decided on <3rd and 4th July. Not all the jockeys' who come from other parts of the world Jo seek fame and fortune in the Old Country live up to the reputations that ■ preceded them, comments the "Sporting Life." But Frank Dempsey, who came from Austria primarily to ride for Sir Charles Hyde, has already made it evident that he has little to learn in the art of horsemanship. Dempsey does not ride so freqeuntly as many other of his contemporaries, but he claims a fair percentage of winners. Perhaps his most impressive finishes so far were thooe on Paddy in the Newbury Cup and Hong Koiijj; at Epsom. Royal Ascot this year was the brilliant social fixture of tho season, and quite lived up to its reputation. Ascot shows an improvement in manners upon the Ascot of a century ago. In those bad old times the racing was far less attractive to most of the public than the cock-fights, wrestling matches, and prize fights that took place daily on the common. George IV., then Priuce Regent, who had journeyed down to the course riding the near leader of his coach and four, while the postilions lolled luxuriously inside, was keenly interested in all the pugilistic encounters, and collected money for the combatants in his own Royal hat.

A number of horses went South by the Maori last night, and no doubt their connections would have wished for a more placid trip. However, the horses have plenty of time to recover from any ill-effects. The horses to make the trip were Passin' Through,* Erie, Many Colours, and Serene. The owner-trainer of Passin' Through stated that the Grand National candidate had done all. that was expected of him since racing at Ellerslie last month. Erie has not been •asked to do a great deal since racing at Trentham, but she will not require a great deal of -work to screw her right up again. Serene has pleased his trainer, and it is reported that J. O'Shea will ride the chestnut in the Winter Cup. P. M'Brearty will ride Many Colours in the Grand National Hurdles.

White Comet and Heisler have gone on to Riccarton from Trentham.

Uncle Bob created a very favourable impression by his form in the Waimate Steeplechase, writes " Argus."', His jumping was not always good, but it is claimed for him that the small fences were not to his liking, and over stiffer country he is expected to jump much better. He waa in front all the way m the race, and though challenged more than once he drew away very readily when called on. He gave the impression that he was a lazy horse who would not fully exert himself when going easily in front, and this may also have accounted for his failure to jump some of his fences "cleanly. He is owned by Mr. G. C. Bain, of Southland, who has been identified with racing in the South tor more than thirty years. Mr. Bain purchased Uncle Bob in the North Island about three months ago, and as he was not then in training he has not had much of a preparation yet, a fact which is worth keeping in mind when considering his future ''prospects. He is going to Riccarton, and his owner is quite sanguine about him negotiating the fences he will meet there. He claims aii engagement in the Grand National Steeplechase, but possibly he will be allowed to miss this event in favour of some of the minor cr,oss-country events at Riccarton.

Kaikahu, who won the hurdle race at Waimate, had shown useful form at Aahburton last month. His jumping in Thursday's race was not perfect, as ha laundered at more than one obstacle. He was always going easily, however, and possibly the lack of pace was . responsible for his slovenly efiorta at a couple of the hurdles. Be looks like making a good hurdler, and he may be seen to further advantage very soon, comments a Southern exchange. New Day was responsible for a useful performance in winning the Bluecliffs Hunters' Steeplechase at Waimate, but he was a trifle lucky to. beat Happy Mac, who lost some ground through trying to take the wrong course at the entrance to the straight.

Kipling ran a decent race in the Wai mate Steeplechase, his performance being far ahead of his showing at Ashburton last month.

Shandre ran a good race when he won the Waihao Hack Handicap at Waimate, and further successes may be expected from him soon.

Fairy Tidings was unlucky in the Waihao Hack Handicap at Waimate. He got into trouble half-way through the journey, but he finished so fnst in second place that he should bo worth keeping in mind the next time he starts, writes " Argus."

Lord Nagar gave a good exhibition of jumping in the Hunt Club Steeplechase at Waimate till he reached a simple hurdle, the last obstacle on tho journey, which ho hit hard and fell, breaking his neck. He was going well at the time, states the " Star," and he gave the impression that he was likely to make a useful steeplechaser. He was a smart hurdler in his day, but he had not shown any form in that department for a long time past.

Clontarf disappointed his admirers at Waimate and apparently he is not quite so good as some of them thought, '['here, was a disposition to give him an outside chance in the Winter Cup, but if WaiiiKi.lo form was correct he can be written out.

Muzzle proved too good a stayer for the horses he met in the Hunters' Plate at Waimate. The Calibre gelding wears well. A surprising thing about him was the big price he was allowed to pay. A year ;i<jo lie was backed very confidently in a similar event ;it the South Canterbury Meeting but fell, when going exceptionally well, not far from the judges' box, and since then he had not had a race until Thursday. Nincompoop has been taken in hand again by I. Mason. Fie is looking a bit rough, hut is apparently in good health, and likely to come to hand quickly for early spring racing. Enare has bcon exhibiting signs of soreness at Riccartou, and may require a short let-up. He was an absentee from the training tracks yesterday morning.

"Mr, <\. M\l>».il'-1 i» ..,jt linvi.»K IIm: Ucsl ul luuk, tur Musical w re^yrluj

lame at Riccarton and an unlikely starter at the National Meeting.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19250725.2.140.1

Bibliographic details

RACING FIXTURES., Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 22, 25 July 1925

Word Count
2,345

RACING FIXTURES. Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 22, 25 July 1925

Working