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SOCCER

[ay "VANQUARD"!

CHATHAM CUP

NEXT SATURDAY'S BIG ATTRACTION

In the first place—congratulations to Scottish Wapderera. Their performance in gaining a place in the local final of the Chatham Cup competition in their first year in the A ranks calls for the highest commendation, and provides striking evidence of that essential to success—a good team spirit. Last season Wanderers carried all before them in the B division championship, and now they have proved themselves worthy of the promotion which they received. In gaining a place in the final of the Chatham Cup competition they have accounted for two very strong teams in Marist and Hospital, and in both cases their success has been due to good, honest endeavour. After being one down against Marist a couple of Saturdays ago, they played in a determined fashion, and as a result of bright forward play, backed _up by strong defensive tactics, they finished up victors by a one goal margin. Against Hospital last Saturday, they had to fight even harder to retain the lead gained in the first spell, but a dogged defence, which numerous opposition attacks could not pierce, won the day, and gave Wanderers the opportunity of meeting Y.M.O.A. in the final. It ia probable that Young Men will take the field iv the, final as favourites, but whether they will be able to live up to the confidence reposed in them is* another matter. In recent matches Y.M.C.A. have not been displaying that form which allowed them to survive the first few matches without defeat, and it is quite on the cards that Wanderers, who, by the way, are improving with every game, will lower their colours. The match at present certainly bears a very open appearance, and when it takes place at the Basin Reserve next Saturday there should be a . record attendance. May the best team win! ; Thistle Out of It. The hopes of Thistle supporters must have been considerably dampened last Saturday when Dempster gave Y.M.C.A. their opening goal so very early in the game, but thoughts of the final of the Chatham Cup competition rose again as quickly when Lennox, seconding Logan, was quick to seize the opportunity of a return from Logan's unsuccessful shot and beat Tarrant with a ground shot, placing the teams on an, equal footing. And this was all within ten minutes of the first whistle. From then on, however, Thistle's game went downhill as far as attack waa concerned. Lennox got into hot water following a warning to himself and another, nnd upon what was, in the referee's opinion, a repetition of the offence, was ordered off the field. There wer^ other incidents - during the first spell in which Lennox was certainly not the offender, but these were passed by without drastic action. Whether deserved or not, there was a certain! amount of sarcasm directed at the referee from the line, but, more happily after the change round these incidents, which might quite easily have developed, snowball fashion, into further incidents, were forgotten, and the game went forward at a rattling pace, at any rate as far as Young Men's forwards and Thistle's defensive players were concerned. Whether ai a result of the pace of the first spell—and much N faster spells have been played by Thistle—or the heavy ground and ball, Thistle tired markedly and failed sadly in" the last half-hour to get going with any great energy and success; they were, moreoverj very considerably handicapped by the loss of Lennox. Now and again their wing men got into stride, Crundwell always being a very willing horse, but their centring was not up, or the half and back tackling was too keen. It appeared fairly plain after the repeated failure of these wing attacks that their one chance lay at centre, with Logan, who kept at it and bustled almost through on several occasions. > V.M.C.A. meanwhile had had things pretty much' their own way as far as "near goal" work was concerned ; for spells of ten minutes or so they did everything but score. Tfieir wing to wing and centre play was good to watch, but even better was the excellent goal-keeping of M'Vean, who undoubtedly, saved Thistle from a grand old licking. His saves, moreover, were not lucky saves; he was right on his game.; Trott made the opening for Young Men's deciding goal, Weatherspoon giving a corner to Ballard, and Nicolle gave the finishing touch from the mill at the goal-mouth. Logan took a tiirn again, adopting his solo bustling style, and three or four times was almost through, while a long shot of his was very near to the net; he pulled up before the two backs and lifted beautifully over their heads, inches high only. Tarrant, of course, was tried out as the game went through and returned successfully, but for all that he was not in his best form by any means. Probably the greasy goal-mouth and the slippery ball troubled him, but ho did not appear altogether as suro as he might have, been.Thistle are out of the Chatham Cup running; the match to-day has decided whether Thistle or Institute are to go ahead for the Charity Cup. A Goal That Counted. The gnmo belonged (o Hospital. Imfc . the only goal scored belonged to Wan- \ derers, and it was the goal that counted. To say that the result was a surprise is to put it mildly, and the winners and «upti<ttt«r* S9BJnj4 Bttr»fi»»4 ice, ittdgißfc by thtir aUtioii, Th« elation f» quite

V.M.C.A. AND WANDERERS IN THE F™AU

justified, as without resorting to any paltry tricks, as one sometimes sees in ,cup-ties, they played a remarkable defensive game against a team trying desperately to break through. In saying that the game belonged to-Hospital, the writer meana that th'..y did practically all %he attacking, ar,d the match, especially in the second half, was almost played in .Wanderer*' half of the field. Hospital should fcive scored at least twice, despite the great defence, and have only themselves to blame for the omission. On one occasion, in particular, Lambert tricked the defence beautifully, and found himself right in front of Kirkland about three yards from goal. A tap of the ball to right or left would have given Kirkland no chance, but Lambert sent a terrific shot straight at him, and he made a great clearance. The cross-bar was hit a couple of times, a back kicked the ball off the goal-line with the goalie" at tho other end, and then Wanderers would lift the siege and tear down the other end, only to be driven back, and have to defend all over again. And there wak.no question about it, they did defend. Tht jjreasy, heavy ball seemed to make no difference, and the writer cannot recall' them making a ( miskick. On the contrary, - the kicking' was safe and sound,' and heart-breaking to their opponents. No wonder that at the end ot' the game, - there were scenes . of enthusiasm seldom seen in local football, and that Kirkland and other players were "chaired" from t^ie ground by their delighted supporters. Kirkland well deserved his ovation, and gave a wonderful exhibition in goal, and there were times when he seemed to do the impossible/ He had luck, 'of course, but that is all in the game, and every goalie is entitled to a slice of it. Jack and Montgomery, at back, played great football, particularly the former, who got through an immense amount of work during the afternoon. The halves were an even lot, and played a splendid defensive game. The -forwards did not shine as much as the defence, for two reasons. ■They were up against a powerful defence, and were seldom set going by their own men. They demonstrated that they were fast and nippy, when they did get the ball, and Lothian was the bright particular star. This player appears to have quite recovered from his injury, and is a fine centre-forward, full of dash and clever footwork. Of the Hospital team, Porteous did not have a great deal to do, and the goal against, him was bad luck, as he was quite unsighted and had no chance with it. The backs did well, and with the halves made a particularly strong defence.. The forwards were not so strong and with the opportunities received should have done better. Dick, Lambert, and Hughes were the pick, (jribb came up forward in the last fifteen minutes in a desperate attempt to break through, and almost succeeded, but it was not to be. It was a real good cup-tie, and did credit to both teams. An Etty Win. In spite" of a threatening sky, the weather was fine at Petone on Saturday when Marist met Institute. Unfortunately for Institute, Marist were "on their game," and left the field with five goals to their favour as against Institute's none. Part of the Petone Recreation Ground was under water, but the greater portion of tho Soccer area was dry. The game from start to finish was brightly played, and, although Marist held the upper hand practically all the time, Institute demonstrated that they wore. not. to ba trifled with. Marist were strong in attack, and their defence was' equally sound. Foremost in the side was M'Elligott, who scored two goals within a short time of starting. Marist easily maintained their lead, and Fitzgerald added a score with a penalty shot. The Marist forwards were quick to get away, and when Thomas gavo them an opportunity, Barton brought the movement to a fine finish with a beautiful shot from the wing. The Institute goalie just managed to reach the ball, but while attempting to fend it off, put it through his own goal. Marchment was conspicuous in the front line, and on several, occasions nearly succeeded in scoring. The two Rudolphs played their usual sound game, and were always handy when needed. The final score came from Burke, who netted tha ball after M'Elligott put in a hot shot. Marist were never pressed, but when. occasion demanded Hickey showed that he was safe between the goal-poets. The Institute goalie played a sound game, and was instrumental in keeping the points down. What "Banker" Thinks. "Banker" forwards the following letter : — "As everybody is picking a 'rep.' team, I thought I would like to submit mine, which, I consider, on present form to be the best in Wellington. Porteous for goal, M'Vean and Tarrant are the next best two, in that order, but I think Porteous is a more resourceful and virile 'keeper, and the best man. Gibb is playing as well as over this season, and here's the rub. I would give him as ■partner, either Taylor or Jack. It's present form we want, and both Taylor and Jack are in first-class form, but I would give the preference to Jack, as the younger man. Tho halves are easy, with M'Arthur, M'Keo, and Burke. The centre-forward ia also easy pickiug, with Lothian fit and well, which he is at present. The inside position I would fill with M'Elligott and Logan, despite the criticism, at times, of the former player. JI» would do mi, aud it jurt th« man to gull » match out o< tb« iit, U Mt4«d.

Ask any half-back in Wellington what they think of M'Elligott, ai.ll they ought to know. The right wing is between Nicolle and Dick, and on this season's form I am inclined to favour the latter. Nicolle is a fine young player with alj his football in front of him, but for Auckland a, more experienced player like Dick would suit me. Cudby, Ballard, or Cunningham, for outside left,' and again on form, I would select Cudby. So my team works out as follows:— Porteous, Gibb, Jack, M'Arthur, M'Kee, Burke, Dick, M'Elligott, Lothian, Logan, Cudby. And I guarantee they would take a power of beating, and if beaten, Auckland would deserve the win."

"Vanguard" cannot agree with "Banker's" selection or his reasoning. To say that Porteous is Wellington a best goalie at the present time is to say a great deal, and there will be few who win agree with the statement. In the writer's opinion, M'Vean, Cox, Tarrant, and Wyatt must all be given preference over Porteous, and that opinion is supported by form. Of the four mentioned, "Vanguard" favours M'Vean, who has shown consistent form, and is both cool and resourceful. . No doubt, Gibb and Jack would prove a solid pair of backs, but what of M'Girr, . Prince, Guest, and others? Experience counts in a Brown Shield game, and M'Girr would inspire the forwards with greater confidence than either Gibb or Jack. "Banker's" half-line is alright, but sureUe has gone astray in the forwards, ian is an almost certain centre, but each of the other four will be very fortunate indeed to secure a place in the final selection. How would this forward lino read: Nicolle, Dempster, Lothian, Campbell, and Ballard? Football Offences.

Members of the W.F.A. are having a busy time at present dealing with football offenders. Almost every meeting night somebody is "on the mat." In lower grades the offence usually consists of some' minor breach of rules, such as playing over age, or playing without being properly registered, but the matter does not always remain there. At this week's meeting the committee had before them two senior play-ers--one for dangerous play, and tha other for adopting a fighting attitude towards the referee at v the conclusion of a game. Both men were suspended for four playing Saturdays. In imposing the sentences, the 'committee gave it to be understood that although they regretted the occurrences as much as the players did, they could not allow such offences to pass unnoticed. The committee also desired to impress on clubs the necessity for all players, helping to maintain order, os and off the field, by the example they should set. Pen Pictures.

Maurice M'Elligott (Marist).—Maurice M'Elligott is a native of this city and was born twenty-six years aj;o. He has been a member of the Marist Club throughout his career, and is a striking proof that we can produce footballers in the Soccer code quite equal to the imported player. He has a wonderful record in representative football, as well as for his club, which could haVe been much better if he had so desired. There is no denying the fact that "Morry" is what oce calls temperamental, and needs to be in the mood to give of his best. And '.when he gives his best, it is good. He is- one of the finest insiderights in New Zealand, who kicks equally well with either foot, and is a first-class'shot. His solo runs, a couple of which he generally brings off in a match, are masterpieces of dribbling at full speed; he is a moet difficult man to tackle. In 1914 he made his first appearance for Wellington in a sth Division "rep." team, and later he was in the" 4th "reps." against those of the sth grade. In 1918 he was again selected to represent Wellington, this time in the ! third grade against Canterbury. Up to j this time he had always been associated with a champion team, as his club won the championship of every grade until 1918. It was this year that Maurice received an honour that'l don't think has ever before or since been conferred on a third grade player. He \vas selected to play in the First Division representatives against Trentham Reihforce'n»ntfl, and then against Auckland and Canterbury. He fully justified the confidence of the selectors, and was firmly established as Wellington's leading inside forward. rJuring the seasons 1919 to 1921 he was regularly in his place in the representatives, appearing in ten games during that period. The most notable games were those against H.M.S. New Zealand, H.M.S. Renown, Auckland (three times}, and Wellington v. North Island. In the game against H.M.S. New Zealand he played what many consider the finest game of his career. The following two seasons ho continued to play for his club, but did not take the game seriously or train in his usual keen style, but last year he started airain in real earnest. The sue-. cesj of Marist in winning the Charity Cup and the Wellington section of the Chatham Cup was in no small measure due to M'Elligott's fine play, and the example lie set his team. He was quickly reinstated in the Wellington representatives, and played against the Fleet (Hood and Repulse) in two matches, against Manawatu, also against New Zealand at Palmerston North. He was also selected to play against the Chinese University team, and then received his New Zealand cap in the Test match against the same team at Dunedin. This season he has started well again and played against Canterbury on 3rd June. It is a fine record of local football, and M'Elligott is still young enough to gain many honours. He has exceptional ability and is an extremely popular clubman both on and off the field. He carries the good wishes of all adherents of the game. In a senior matcn I was watching last Saturday, the players, or, rather, some of them, showed an indifference that was surprising. When spectators see a player or players almost bored to death, and evidently not trying, it is almost certain to make them bored, too, and promise to give that team a, miss next week. If the game is worth playing it is wor,tb playing keenly, and with a bit of )f.Z$ In it. We have players who, if things do not go exactly as they think they should, crawl into their shell and lose all further interest in the game. This is undoubtedly a poor spirit, and, fortunately, I don't think there arc many like it, but still there are a few. The few can.be generally found amongst the star players, who no doubt feel assured of their positions, and think the club cannot do without them. This, perhaps, is true, or partly true, as a non-trier, however good a player he may be, is usually a source of trouble and annoyance to everybody, and a spell on the bank is his best medicine.

"Football is the funniest business in the world. You must have support to t«t a team, yit you snut hm ft Una t« «ia| mpporl,"

SENIOR A. Coals Ch. P. W. D. I. For. Ag. Pts. Marist 10 8 8 1 88 9 15 V.M.C.A 9 8 2 1 31 12 14 Hospital 9 6 2 2 32 12 12 Thistle 9 I 8 2 19 IB 11 Diamonds 10 4 1 5 25 10 9 S. Wanderers 9 8 2 4 15 20 8 Institute 10 2 S 5 17 37 7 Watersids ...,, 10 0 010. 11 52 0

SENIOR B. Goal! Ch. t. W. D. L. For. Ag. Pts. V.M.C.A. "C" ......... 9 8 0 1 37 8 16 Brooklyn 0 7 11 34 11 15 Johnsonville 9 7 0 2 28 18 U V.M.C.A. "B" 0 5 0 4 19 17 10 Seatoun 0 4 14 24 13' 0 Pctone 9 4 0 6 22 20 8 Diamonds 8 2 0 6 5 30 4 Welgasco 92 0 7 II 18 4 Swifts tOOt 8 S3 0

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Bibliographic details

SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 10, 11 July 1925

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3,215

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 10, 11 July 1925

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