Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

RACING NEWS

NOTES AND COMMENTS

(BY "VEDETTE"')

' The Victoria Racing Club's Meeting will, be.continued to-morrow and concluded on Saturday. Rahda, who finished third in the V.R.C. Hurdles on Saturday, is trained by the erstwhile New Zealander, D. J. Price. Commenting on the proposed alteration of the Gaming Laws in Victoria, the Melbourne "Leader" says editorially :— "Any amendment of the racing legislation which does not tighten up tho permit clause, set a limit to the number of permits to be granted, and wholly remove political interference from the business will bo worse than useless." Generally, this applies very particularly i to New Zealand. j J. Buchanan has done very well during the current racing season, which is now rapidly drawing to a close, having won no fewer than twelve races. His best performers have been Polonett and Merry Damon, both of whom were well up in tho winning.list. Buchanan has a very promising team to commence the new season with. The horses under hia charge include Polonett, Merry Damon, Joy Ride, Cohesion, Three Cheers, Serang, Gold \Fern, Holymond, Brushwood Boy, and a rising two-year-old colt by Nassau from Cassock. Polonett and Merry Damon are big and healthy after a brief respite from active toil, and have only recently resumed work, writes "Archer." The latter was a good two-year-old and his prospects for a successful career as a three-year-old look bright. Serang is another wellbred young horße iii the stable that should be a good proposition, as a three-year-old. This fellow is handsome-looking, and has plenty of pace. Ho is by Absurd from Moira Machree, hence a brother to Loyal Irish. '■ ' Arch Amie is said to be looking a picture and a credit to her trainer. This ia a much-improved mare. ' Arch Arrow, the rising two-year-old colt by; Arrowsmith from Loyal Irish, is thriving on the work allotted him, and he.is improving iff appearance, every day, says an exchange, His sire was a brilliant galloper, while his dam was a good two-yearroldj , therefore this youngster may be expected to como on early. W. Ryan, who was severely, injured in a motor accident at Taumarunui about seven weeks, ago; has made a good recovery, and is riding work agajn. The accident was unfortunate ■ for ■ the ■wellknown horseman ani prevented him from riding Sir Archie and Musketoon at the Auckland Winter Meeting., Lord Astor's ill-fortune in the Derby has almost passed into a tradition, but Alec Taylor a principal patron cannot complain of his luck in the -Oaks, which he!? won this yeir with Saucy Sue, and also provided the Vrunner-up in Mis» Gadabout. It was only three years ago that Lord. Astor won the corresponding race with Pogrom, while during tho war he won a "New Oaks" at Newmarket with Sunny Jane. This year's winner is probably easily the best of the three, and not unlikely also the best of her sex since the days when Pretty Polly carried all before her. Frank Bullock, who rode Saucy Sue, has been singularly unlucky in tho classic's,, his only previous success, having been recorded on the same filly in the One Thousand Guineas. Taylor has now trained seven Oaks winners. ' . , ... .■' .'', .'■: ' ' That very promising two-year-old John Bradbury has just been put into work again at Wingatui. At • a meeting of stewards of the Mastertori Racing Club ,Mr. D. K. Logan stated that about thirty members had expressed the opinion^to him that tho club should amalgamate with the Carterton Club. Mr. Logan said: "My own opinion is that amalgamation of the two clubs will have to come, sooner or later. The stewards should seriously consider it. Members think we should race either on their course or our own." Mr; J. lorns (chairman) said that the conditions Carterton wanted on amalgamation were no good to Masterton. The Masterton course had far better appointments than Taratahi, where the buildings were atrocious. Mr.'E. G. Eton thought amalgamation should be tried for, even if it meant having a new course. Mr. I6rns thought it would be disloyal to Masterton to race at Taratahi. Doubt whether it would improve Masterton's finances to join up was expressed by Mr. F. Jensen, 'who said members had spoken to him also about it. Further consideration was held over. Lady Ridicule is again one of the regular workers at Ellerslie. It is stated that she carries a bright appearance, and should soon come to hand. The fact that the Australian Jockey Club allotted £16,300 for jumping races this season formed the subject of much laudatory comment in Sydney. In looking up the records attaching thereto the fact was established that it comprised 23 days' racing. Pursuing my researches a bit further (writes "'Phaeton"), I ticked off the respective amounts allotted by the Auckland Racing Club for jumping events this season, and, with £15,050 tabulated as the sum for 11 days, it must bo said that 1 the A.R.C. figures come out well when ranged alongside those associated with the 23 days -held by the Australian Jockey Club. Mr. W. H. Wackrow's good performers, Boomcrday, Gala Day, and' Broadwood, are getting- through useful tasks at Ellerslie. Their trainer, R. E. Brown, has them in first-class/ health, and Boomerday, who is going along satisfactorily in his preparation for Riccarton, is amass of condition, states the "Herald." Neither Gala Day nor Broadwood is doing a great deal at present. Paragraphs are going the rounds concerning the attempted sale of Nine of Spades. The latter's owner, V. H. Colello, states that he does not wish to sell the Elysian gelding, who is destined for, jumping races. . ' The announcement of the death of Mr. H. Byron Moore, who , had been secretary to the Victoria ' Racing Club for the long period of 45 years,, evoked widespread expressions of regret. Mr. Moore's illness was only of a brief character, and the end came with, an attack of pneumonia. In an obituary notice of the late Mr. Moore the "Australasian" remarked : "No racing club ever had a more loyal servant. Flemington he affectionately described as 'his baby,' and no child had more care and attention lavished on it. Mr. Byron Moore was the guiding hand that made Flemington what it is today—; the premier racecourse in the Southern Hemisphere—and it will form a lasting monument to his energy and ability." Mr. Moore candidly admitted that he was not a racing man, by which, of course, he meant that he was not immersed with the sporting aspect of the question. It is related he was fond of a good story, arid often told one against himself. One day he was going out to Flemington to inspect the course, and raiig up'a. car. The driver, knowing that liis fare -was to be.Mr. Moore, told his friends at the garage that he would ask Mr. Moore for a good tip, and they could back it, the following day. When Mr. Moore had, completed hia business at, Flemineton he wan iust «tap-

'Beg pardon, sir, but would you be good enough to tell me what is your best tip for to-morrow?" Mr. Mooro thought for a moment, and he then said : "Why, my boy, I don't know one end of-'a horse from the other, but don't you think the lawns look lovely?"^ On Friday night the Manawatu Trotting Club decided to hold its annual meeting in March on tho Ashhurst race-' course. Feilding and Levin Racing Clubs offered their courses,' but the stewards decided on Ashhurst. Adjutor bruised a foot last week, and this was responsible for his not being brought North with the remainder ol F. Shaw's team for Trentham. Cashman (A. G. Campbell) started off at the sod wall to jump once round over the schooling fences at Riccarton on Saturday. He made a faulty jump at the brush obstacle in front of tho stand, but soon recovered, and ran off at tho first of the double. Continuing on, he ran off at the sod wall. He was brought back, and .jumped the double, and finished over the last three fences in good style. It seems a pity that he has cultivated the habit of shirking his fences, as according to all accounts he is a beautiful jumper. Diomedes, who was unbeaten as a two-year-old in England last year, failed to gain a place in the Paradise Stakes at Hurst Park last month. It was his first defeat. The race was won by Dignity, a colt trained by the ex-Victorian Norman , Scobie for Sir Charles Hyde. Dig-, pity was ridden by Frank Bullock, who, like Scobie, is an Australian. ! Prior to the, Oaks at Epsom Saucy Sue had not run on a round course, and after turning into the straight she hung away to the right through inex-, perience, and the noise of the crowd on the rails (states the "Sporting Life"). It was thought that the ring of her bit had come through her mouth, but Frank Bullock stated that this was not so, but the filly, when she' began to "prop," gave him rather an anxious moment. The Manton jockey, however, never thought that his mount could be beaten. Pildin's success in the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdles on Saturday makes the Sydney form appear rather, good.. With his 71b penalty, Pildin carried 10.5 on Saturday, which is 61b less than his impost when successful in the A.J,C. Hurdle Race. : .

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19250707.2.111

Bibliographic details

RACING NEWS, Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 6, 7 July 1925

Word Count
1,555

RACING NEWS Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 6, 7 July 1925

Working