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NOTES AND COMMENTS

(BY "VEDETTE.")

FIXTURES.

September 25, 26—Geraldine K.C. September 27—Xapier Park R.C. October I—Hawkes Bay J.C. October 2—Kurow J.C. October 4, 6, s, 11—Australian J.C October 4—Pakuranga Hunt Club. October 9, 11—Dunedin J.C. October 10, 11—Masterton K.C.

The results of the classic races at Avondale have been interesting, to say the least, and in some respects may necessitate a revision of ideas. First, in regard to the two-year-olds, Automne confirmed his Stakes victory by scoring in the handicap on Monday, Lady Cavendish moving up to second place in the absence of Hyde Park, second in the Stakes. This seems to confirm Autoniiie's form conclusively; and apparently the grandson of Autumnus is good. For all that, early two-year-old form is often deceptive, and his nest race and races will be watched with interest. He is not engaged in either of the two-year-old races at Hastings or Napier, nor is it likely that he would be a runner if he were, and he has not a Wellesley Stakes engagement.> He is in the Welcome Stakes both at Ellerslie and Riccarton, and, although he could race at both places, it is very unlikely he will be asked to do so, seeing that only seven days separate the two races. Lady Cavendish is engaged in the Wellesley Stakes, and in the Auckland and Christchurch races. Mimetic, who rather disappointed his many admirers, should yet atone for his two defeats, for if there is anything in appearances he is a good celt. The Wellesley Stakes has been passed over in his case, but again he 100 has the dual engagement at Auckland and Christchurch.

With regard to the three-year-olds, luahine and Inferno have claims to aiost consideration. Inferno at Wanganui did' not have such'a strong field to beat if one may.take a line through. Ilka, who does noi seem to have raced particularly well at Avondafe. Inferno, however, won so easily that no idea could be gained of-how good he is. Tuahine on Monday apparently had not much to spare when winning from Master Doon, whose form last year was moderate. Master Doon, like the winner, is by Lucullus. Subjection seems to have run a better race than at Wanganui, but again failed to stay, while Motley ran. as expected. Tuahine looks like proving a high-grade filly, .but one would hesitate yet to class her quite as good as Inferno, while Subjection cannot be discarded yet. ljove-|a-Duck, at Mr. John Grigg's Longbeach Stud, has foaled a colt to. Martian, The ■ newcomer is a halfbrother to I'Amour. Snapshot (Calibre -l'"irst Glance), at the same stud, has foaled a colt to Gay Lad. Tho 1923 Derby winner, Papyrus, ran his last raco on 18th July, when lio finished second to Polyphontes in tho Kclipse Stakes at Newmarket, and Mr. J. h\ Hornung will therefore have to depend upon his horso at tho stud to recoup him tho £35,000 which ho expended in tho purchase of tho son of Tracery in December last, writes " Phaeton." Though Papyrus is not elovatod to a place with the great Derby winners, he is said to look fully tho part as a stallion. High standard as a Derby winner no doubt counts for a great deal, but it can also be said that some Derby winnows estimated poorly won marked distinction at the stud, and Sainfoin, to whom Papyrus traces on the fire's side, was one. I once saw it stated in ono oi London's leading sporting journals that Sainfoin was probably the worst liorsa. that evei won Derby honours at Kpsom. Sainfoin proved a stud success, and among tho horses he sired was Rock Sand, who won the triple crown—Two Thousand Guineas, Derby, and St. Legor—and who was subsequently sold for xi 25,000. The Riccarton horseman C. Emerson uas in good form on the opening day at Ashburton, scoring on Kilfano, Sun Up, and Winkie's Best, Ho was creciit-<-.d with riding an especially good race on Kilfane. Deucalion's victory on the second day at Ashburton was evidently not unexpected in some quarters, for" ho was we'll backed. He was noticed finishing on very well in his race on the first day. . Those who had been watching the gallons at Riccarton considered tho New Zealand Cup candidate Tiff unbeatable in the Ashburton Cup. To their consternation ho ran very badly, failing to finish m tho lirst four. Despite this showing, however, it is said that ho should not bo discarded altogether as yet for (lie Now Zealand Cup. Palestrina was interfered with three tin-longs from homo in the Ashburton Gup. 11. Burns, on Deucalion, was adjudged the cause of tho trouble, and was suspended for one month. Southern writers agree that the Solfenno—Formless lilly Lava is likely to turn out a usoful three-year-old. It i s suggested she will bo a sprinter rather tnan a slayer. The five classic events of tho English lint this year .were won by different horses and descendants of different sires Diophon (by Grand Parade) won the Iwo lhousand Guineas, Pack (by Hurry On) led the field home in tho One Thou/, snd Guineas, Sansovino (by Swynford) won the Derby, Straitlace (by Son-in-Lawj captured tho Oaks, and Salmon Jrout (by The • Tetrarch) beat tho onposition in the St. Leger. Songbird's performances at Ashburton considerably impressed regular racegoers On the first day ho was in anything but racing condition, but was a good second. On the concluding day, looking none tho worse for one severe race ho never looked like being beaten over the last furlong. It is certain that if he remains sound he will have to be reckoned with in the best company. Lucinette impressed those who saw her race at Ashburton on- Saturday as a likely New Zealand Cup candidate. She was running on well at tho end of the mile and a quarter. An interesting fact connected with the St. Leger winner Salmon Trout is that his dam, in foal to The Tetrarch was sent up to auction in the December cf 1920, and m a competition that assumed tho sensational phase Lord Furness beat his opponents for possession ot the mare with a bid of 16,000ns winch beat all previous records for a brood mare In due time Snla.mmdra produced a bay colt as the result, of Iwr mating with Tho Tctraivh, and the youngster, went up to auction i» tho nutumii of 1922, when he fell to the bid of the commissioner acting for the Agha Khan at 3000gns. The colt in j aUttSiiW. }* idfifttjcui .wjili galsiori.TjautJ

who won classic distinction at Doncaster last week.

Ophir's win in the Trial Plate at Ashburton broke a long run of near-successes for Sir Charles Campbell, who now owns Tigerland and En Route. Ophir, who is a, cast-off of R. J. Mason's stable, is a three-year-old chestnut gelding by Solferino from Adour. ■

With regard to the cable from Sydney received yesterday concerning Mr. H. A. Knight's expressed intention of bringing Ballymena home before the A.J.C. Meeting as a protest against the disqualification ot Jones and M'Carten, a Southern writer states that a number of Mr. Knight's friends in the South cabled last week expressing the hope that Ballymena would, be left to contest the rich weight-for-age races at Randwick. After last Saturday's running at Rosehill, it does seem certain that Mr. Knight is throwing away the chance at winning several thousands of pounds, although the spirit actuating the motive, loyalty to his employees, may have something to recommend it. The whole is largely a matter of opinion. Count Cavoa* impressed 'the critics very favourably by his winning performance at Ashburton, and his prosfects in classic races in the South bear an improved appearance. 'Cardigan" writes: "When R. J. Mason brings two-year-olds to Sydney they can usually gallop, and I do not tmnk he has made any mistake this year in having Chignon and Nincompoop sent over to him. They can both gallop well, and of the two I fancy the filly, Chi»lon, is at present the speediest."

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Bibliographic details

NOTES AND COMMENTS, Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 74, 24 September 1924

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1,334

NOTES AND COMMENTS Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 74, 24 September 1924

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