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SOCCER

IBV "VANGUARD 11]

THE CHINESE

"FAILED IN BEING TOO GENTLE".

, In view of the marked improvement shown by the Chinese team in matches played in various parts of the .North. Island subsequent to the Wellington fixture, the defeat of the visitors by Auckland by. five goals to one came as a disappointment to follower's of the game generally. Apparently, there was only oue satisfactory, feature of the game, knd that was the attendance of close on 50,000, a record for the round-ball game in New Zealand. Auckland did not have their best team, in the field, but even then, the Chinese tourists were badly outclassed, fading right ontof the picture in the second spell. The "New Ztaland Herald" states: "Although the game could not be describe? as a thrilliut;. exposition of the code, play was at times brilliant and always well worth watching. These lithe, young representatives .of modern China have yet to learn the finer points of. Association football, but in many • departments of the game they ara already adepts. Probably never before have Aucklanders witnessed such deft footwork and smart recovery when beaten for the ball, as some of the visitors ' showed. They failed in being too gentle. Invariably ™" the forwards were attacking and tha ball got beyond their reach they stood off and allowed the opposing backs to clear, thus losing all the advantage goir.ed. Their shooting for goal, too, i £i d vim and crispnees, while the half-backs often lay too far back, and were not in position to return the ball when the forwards lost possession .token on tho whole the Auckland team piayed well and their concerted work was of a very high order. In justice to tne Chineso it must be conceded that two of the locals' goals were of the lucky order." J

■ Speaking at a function after the match, Mr. A. Meiwies, chairman of tho Auckland executive, thanked the Chinese fen- making the tour.and complimented both teams on their splendid gp.mo, pla-yod in the truest' sporting spirit. Saturday's match marked the passing of another milestona in the history of Association football in New Zealand, for tho groat attendance of the public Jmd broken oil records. The visitors hnd dono much -to foster tbo brotherhood of sport between two groat nations, and ho felt anro nothing biit -lasting good could result from snch a tour. Although bouton tlio viistors were by rio moans diogrncod, as AucSolnd was undoubtedly tho premier "Soccer" province of Now Zealand.

Mr. A. E. Doaift, manager of the vifiitmg tonm ; said tho players had improved considerably since the first matcheo in New Zealand, but ho was rnther disappointed with the manner in which they had fallen away in the latter stages of the game on Saturday. The team lacked only finish to make a firstclass sido, and they were gradually learning tho finer points. With' next week spent at Rotorua there was an opportunity to rest the star'players, and hs felt confident they would be able to put up a better game in the first Test next Saturday than they had done against Auckland.

_• .To-day the first Test match of the tour is being played at Auckland, and next Saturday the Chinese and New Zealand teams will meet at Wellington in the second Test. j NOTES 'I Institute have played ' several good j games this season, but never a game i such as they played against Hospital lost Saturday, at Porirua. Their most optimistic supporter never thought they would score 4 goals and bring off the biggest surprise the season. The previous meeting resulted in Hospital winning 3-0, and when Institute found that Dickinson was not able to play, and the playing of a substitute meant tho reorganising of the team, their prospects lid not look tod bright. But the reorganisation seemed to work, wonders in the team, and the forwards especially gave the best exhibition of forward play seen, at Porirua this season. They were last and nippy, holding the ball just long enough to draw the defence, then with short, sharp passes they would reach staking distance, and let 'drive. Many shots went wide, but four reached their objective, and they were all good goals; well played for and well earned.

At one time the score was 4-0 in their favour, ajid ; they were playing as if they were going to get more. The home team was not only being defeated, it was Deing routed,1 and the astonished Hospital supporters could not help but cheer the much younger and lighter team. Hospital did eventually manage to break through a sterling defence, and ironical cheers from a fickle crowd greet-, ed their efforts. It was ever thus. Another goal was obtained before the finish, but they left the field defeated by the rather heavy margin of 4-2. The Institute forwards, as I remarked before, gave a splendid display, each one combining with .tho other in a perfect manner. Rusterholz and Dempster on the left wmg, slightly overhshado.wed hcid and N. Smith oa the right, but not by much, as both wings were stron" Jimmy Smith, as centre forward was quite ,1 success in his now vole, feediuc Ins wings, worrying the.backs. !ln d not forgetting to test the . goalkeeper. Jcilery was the star performer among the defenders, and gave a great display as centre half. This player will surely catch tho "rep." selector's eye in die near future. He was ably supported by ivellahar, while Bell and Calvert,- at lack kicked and played as if it was ilie fin;il of the Chatham Clip.- Bm-t saved-several good shots, his catching and holding being vei . y c . lonn On tlie day's pl» y " (.liure was not a weak link i n the team, and they played as a team, not as individuals. In strikimr contrast Hospital, rarely showed any i effective combination and «:liu4 faxj

DISAPPOINTING DISPLAY AT AUCKLAND

too much on individual efforts. Lambert was an absentee through indisposition; and D. Ferguson again came into the team, otherwise they ■were at full ■ strength. At half-time, with 2-0 against, they were not perturbed, although curFrised at the form of their opponents. It was thought to be a flash in tha pan, and the second spell woold show the more experienced team in a different light; but two more goals were added to the total and the team became panicky and quite disorganised. No less than' three centre forwards were tried in an attempt to save the game, and in. the closing stages J. Ferguson also joined the forwards, leaving Thompson to play the one back game. It was all in vain, as, although two goals were obtained in the last twenty minutes, when Hospital were playing n'uch better, the effort was too late. The weakness was in the forwards, and they certainly had a very bad off day. Hughes and Dick were the only men to approach their usual form. The defence played well on the whole, although they failed to check their speedy opponents on several occasions. It was not surprising, for they had to contend with the strongest front line they had met this season.

A word of praise is due to Mr. H. Tyrer, who refereed the game, and is one of the Hospital team selectors. The . referee appointed failed to appear or- to notify the clubs concerned, and a difficult situation was relieved by Mr. Tyrer consenting to officiate. He controlled the game in an admirable manner. Those who pay Thistle Clnb "subs," those who talk Thistle, and those who barrack Thistle were, from all accounts, quite surprised when Thistle did not win against Diamonds last Saturday at Association Park, but there was no question about it, Diamonds deserved' their win, even though they were, in a sense, quite lucky'to get it. During the tost spell they had considerably the better of the play, their.half and forward work being very. bright and well balanced, but* in the second Thistle made things more hopeful from a Blue point of view, and had their shooting been up to anything like standard, they would ■ at least have drawn level.. Although Diamonds pressed home considerably more attacks than did the Blues, Thistles, nevertheless, "gave it a go more frequently, Boadle, wBo moved up to inside right from the Balf-line, taking the place of Pearce in the second spell, Logan and Smith slammin^ shots m whenever an opportunity could be made, from well out if close quarters could not be reached. Logan generally manages to net at least One goal pc? average match, but last Saturday his elevation was all at sea, thou-h his footweight and direction were ° right enough Half a dozen times during the game he cleared the crossbar with* feet to spare, beautiful Ru-by goals,- but useless in Association football. Smith WKii 1"*^ 6 Position> Playe<l strenuous than he has done on the oustide in equally fast games. Graham was weak and consequently, Thistle's right wing did not balance any too well with- the left Crundwell, on that wing, laid himself out to spoil Diamond rfght-wing- work and made a heavy afternoon of it, Ms tackling being keen and steady ' Diamonds' front '.liners generally work!L f m Tm Aether, although for the most part they kept play fairly open btrangely enough, Hearn, who specialised m his back play in first-time returns, several times showed hesitation as centre-forward before goal. Possibly the chances looked better with the other foot on each occasion. But for Daniel's stepping lively, Diamonds would, possibly not have opened their score at all. Hearn bad gone right through the deience (solo) from Wei] out, tricking his way past Taylor and dribbling on again almost to the goal mouth. There, with kwing a few feet in front of him, and with laylor coming, from the side he hesitated, tried. the other foot maybe? and shot weakly, an easy one for Ewin" Daniel however, had closed up from behind, ami banged into the comer of tho net. Hearn's hesitation spoilt at least a couple of bright chances following that.

Diamond forwards were not so readily mehned to bang shots in from, all angles The wings centred well, but generally from near the corner fla-s Weatherspoon and Taylor holding them pretty consistently, to the side" lines >vhen Blue territory was invaded. Daniel played as bright a ga m a any f " ward on the fifld, ands A. WKee "Ua solid team member tiU his, knee "aye out in the second spell, after which 3 he was more or less a passenger, though he stack to it with his one good leg. The half play on both sides was always interesting, Diamonds leading in this department by a trifle. Hawkins, at back for Diamonds, does not behave, apparently, in returning a ball if there is a fair chance that it win roll over the lme and qualify f ro m ■> goal. kick. Maybe that is wiser• Si™ risking the giving away o f a ooSer ml tight squeeze, but he very nenrlv !„? TWstle thnjagh.in the second spiS. ' f}t H T$L < 3"lto,, fast enough, and by the time CWwell was near enough to centre perfectly to Logan, Hawking eonld not move fast enough. The optor tnnity was too good to mi ss . but L?An y> Ws record skiqd What is -the ol>ject o£ the W F -\ i,, keeping V.11.C.A. ami Mari,t apart* i Last Saturday they botli were draw,; agoiiwt teimi tl>at were certain w Ula and actually .scored 12 goals' between them, with ono against. Theso teama have not yet even met in the first round ami as they are tho two leading teams it is surpnsing that they wSre not drawn against each other last Saturday Another chanco and a good draw ha» been missed by not putting V.M 0 A instead of Hospital against ilaris't un the Basin JW.rvo to-day. I[ Marist are Lenten to-day it makes Uio cli.impionsl.ip almost a certainty for Y.M.CIA al though they havo never met Marist nuwr-only meotmg tliis season was in wo Ohuthiun and Cluu-ifest Cub jnatclC.

when the result was a draw, 2-2, and in the replay Marist won 2-1, so the two teams are well matched.

Apparently Soccer people up in Auckland do not believe in hiding their light under a bushel. Speaking at a function, given in connection with the visit of the Chinese team, the chairman of tha Auckland Association stated that undoubtedly Auckland was the premier Soccer province of New Zealand. Wellington had. challenged his point, but were slow to. challenge for the Brown Shield, which' would be a definite manner of deciding the issue. He assured the visitors that Auckland could administer a far sounder beating to "Wellington than' they had been able to inflict upon the Chinese team.

'It may not be generally known, but the great game of football which no^i has its devotees under different codes in most countries cf the world was fire* thought of in China." Thus Mr., A. E. Dome, manager of the team of. Chinese Soccer players, when asked at Auckland how long football had been pkyed in China. Mr. Dome said that old records of the country's history told how hundreds of years ago,. a Chinese lady with many suitors was at a loss to como to a decision in choosing a husband. Finally she had all the swains assembled beneath her balcony and tossed a ball in their midst. This was probably the first throw-in from touch on record. The main who gained possession, eluded the rest of the "players, • and brought the ball back to the lady was chosen as her mate in life. From this evolved a ball game which spread rapidly all over the country was adopted in Japan, and finally found favour among the nations of the West m some form or other. Football under English Association rules, said Mr. Dome, was introduced into China by officers and men of! the-British Royal Navy some 25 years ago. -It made its f eal advance after the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. At the present time, while the game is very popular in China, he knows of only one case where it is played outsido an educational institution.""

A difficult situation confronts a forward when the goalkeeper throws him?f on the ball and persists in lying on it. The goalie is; of course, not goinw to release the ball for the forward to make an almost certain score, and then again he may be trying to get rid of the ball put is not able to do so. In kicking at the ball, the forward brings himself within reach of the law governing dangerous play, as happened in a recent match on two occasions. The question ia, what is the forward to I? j „ cannot be expected to stand off and let the goalie kick clear. A goalkeeper may be charged wnen in possession of the ball Trot it "is a difficult thing to do when he is lying on the ground cuddling the ball as. if hts very life depended on it. The writer remembers reading of a similar happening recently in firs^class football at Home, although he cannot remember the teams. The goalkeeper had collected the ball on the goal-line, and, seeing no means of getting rid of it laid on top of it. An enterprising forward suddenly went down on'his knees m front of the goalie and charged him and ball into the net. The goal was allowed and the critics commended the forward for his quick solution of an awKwara predicament. CHATHAM COI> EULES. "The action.of the Auckland Football Association in nominating the winners of their league as their representatives in tne Chatham Cup is not in conformity with the rules of the Cup, and it seems surprising that the N.Z.F.A. alJ°wed it,' says a correspondent. "The Onatnam Cup is open to every amateur club team in New Zealand. Each club desirous of entering shall give notice of such desire, and shall with such notice forward an entrance fee of twenty-one shillings. The rules again say: 'There shall be a qualifying competition arranged by the council and carried out by each affiliated association to determine the leading club in its own area, etc. Harbour Board is the team selected by Auckland, and it is very questionable whether they, or, in fact, any Auckland team has entered for the Chatham Cup. -In Wellington, eleven teams entered for the cup, and the competition has been conducted according to rules, and the JN.Z.F.A. have benefited to the extent of £11 in entrance fees alone. How many entrance fees have been received from Auckland? I have nd desire to strike a discordant note, but if this cup is to be the success that we hope in the future, now is the time to see that the rules are carried out and a proper foundation laid. The whole essence of the cup is the knock-out principle, with eventually two club teams reaching the final. How is this principle being observed it associations are going to be allowed to nominate their league champions? If Auckland is allowed to do this it is a certainty that Wellington and probably other centres, will do the same next season. It is well known that the W.F.A. is not enamoured with the cup, owing to the games seriously interfering with their league fixtures, and they would probably welcome the opportunity to nominate a team instead of having to arrange eliminating rounds. But if this is done it will practically He she end of the cup." ALTEKATIONS TO RULES. The International Football Association Board approved of several alterations to the laws of the game at their recent meeting. No drastic alterations were made in the offside law, but it was decided to add a footnote\to the effect that: 'It is not a breach of the law for a player to be in an offside position, but only when in. that position he interferes with an opponent or with the play. If a player who is in an offside position advances towards an opponent or the ball and in so doing causes the play to be aftected he should be penalised."

There were two decisions regarding the corner kick. Law 10, which states that when a free-kick has been awarded the kicker's opponents shall not approach within ten yards of the ball until the kick is taken, will riot in future apply to tho corner kick.

taw 11 has been altered to read:— "That a goal may be scored direct from a corner kick, or from a free-kick, which is awarded because of any infringement of law 9, but not. from any other free-kick."

Under law 9, players are penalised for dangerous play, hands, holding, pushing, violent or dangerous charging, and charging from behind. ■ -

_ The present decision of the International Board respecting law 13 (duties and powers of referee),will bo substituted by the following: "If, iv the opinion of the referee, a player has been seriously injured, the gamo shall be stopped, the player at onco removed from tho field of play, and the gamo resumed. If a player is slightly injured the game shall not be stopped until the ball has ceased to be ia plajjti

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Bibliographic details

SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 41, 16 August 1924

Word Count
3,206

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 41, 16 August 1924

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