Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

SOCCER

One thing i s certain—the sole selector of tho New Zealand team for the fi>st Test match at Auckland (Mr. B. L. Salmon) has done his work well. The team which he has chosen is a strong one in every department of the game, and although some disappointment is sure to be expressed at the omission of certain prominent' players, it will be' generally admitted that the eleven is one of tho strongest that has yet represented the Dominion, luve of the eleven ar» from Auckland, three from Wellington, ono from Canterbury, one from Southland, and one from "Otago. and this proportion just about represents the strength of various provinces. It was generally expected that Ewing and Ciaxton would have a close race of it for the position of goal-keeper, and the fact that Mr. Salmon has chosen Crar-c----ton for the important post should cause no heartburning; Craxton has represented New Zealand on several occasions;, and each time he has come out of the test with flying colours. There is no evidence that he has gone off this season, and no doubt he will again fill the position of New Zealand's custodian with credit to' himself. Wellington enthusiasts will be pleased to'learn that .Ewing will probably be asked to act as goal-keper in the second Test at Wellington. This player has been keeping brilliantly for Thistle throughout the present season, and he gave a finished display against the Chinese students. His play cannot be very far behind that of Oraxton. The chosen full-back, J. Anderson (Otago) and L. W. M'Girr (Wellington), may be relied on to form a solid line of resistance. Anderson plays with the Seacliff Club at Dunedm, and those who saw the Chatham Cup final .at Wellington last year will remember his sterling display. His form this year has also' been good, and with his brother, G. Anderson, he played a great, game against Sunnyside last Saturday. M'Girr has played' brilliantly this season, his clean tackling and powerful . kicking having been of great advantage to V.M.C.A. He also proved a source of trouble to the Chinese forwards. While surprise will no doube be expressed at tlie omission of Neil M'Arthur from the half line, it will bo conceded that the three halves chosen are all worthy of a place. D. Corbett, who will act as pivot, is a very resourceful player, who uses his head in more ways than one. • Neesham is another Aucklander who has won his spurs' in big "football. Against Wellington in last yearns Brown Shield game, ho gave a bright display. M'Creanor (Canterbury) is one of those solid rather than brilliant players, and he has been a tower of strength in tho Nomad Club's half line this season. Little fault will be found with the forward line which has been selected. The writer has not seen E. Cook (the Southland representative) in action this season, but Southern exchanges speak very highly of his work as centre-forward. The remaining' forwards,. R. Innes, C. Dacre, G. Campbell, and C. Ballard, have all been tiied out in big football, and they should bs the makings of a very solid vanguard. They have a good knowledge of oach other's play, having toured Australia together. The appointment of "Geordie" Campbell as captain will be a popular one with- players and followers of the game, alike. M'Elligott, of the Wellington Marist Club, will act as reserve for the forward line. The writer was inclined to' the opinion that he should have been included in the team, bu1; the fact that Dacre is playing up to form made his task of winning a place a very difficult one. Perhaps a place-will be found for him in the second Test at Wellington. M'Kintry (South Auckland) will act as reserve back. Mr. Salmon is to bo congratulated on the wisdom he has shown in selecting tho team. - ' i WITH THE CHINESE TEAM. Reports to hand indicate very clearly that the Chinese University team has improved very considerably ' under it made its appearance in Wellington, and suffered defeat to the tune of four goals to nil. They have proved, at any rate, that they can score goals, Hawkes Bay and Wanganui having been convinced of this fact in no uncertain manner. After their defeat at Wellington the Chinese team went on to Napier and there they defeated a Hawkes Bay team by two .goals to nil. Poverty Bay were their next opponents, and on this occasion tuey played a drawn game, neitlier side managing to score a goal. At Palmerston North they again tasted defeat, but it appears that their play was interfered with very considerably W unfavourable weather conditions. The "Standard of 31st July remarked : "The ground, owing to the heavy rainfall hZ IUI cxceedin# ly b*d Paying order; being heavy and in parts covered by >°°l. s ° Va'er- Undoubtedly this militated against the best -exhibition of the code by the Chinese, who proved ■Vheir heading, heeling, and fine toe ni ShGW? d What the >' we« capable of under good conditions, and on several i)hvpd ; lhe 1 10cal men, in the main, Played a sound game, but lacked the 2*l, Vif CS °f tricky combined work which often -put their opponents in a scoring position, though ™JnZ placed the visitors seemed to lack the fo? tko fi ,° f° Uud Suilccl the "liters Now 7 i ,limesillc« their.' arrival in «. ■ prov"' H Tlf° re6ult WM ««* v proven themselves very tumcli o,i Penor to. the Wanganui eleven"^ fe n'» r . rf I"" Previous day, and on baluuky forenoon, had little ,'ffeot on ."ffund:™ und: says the Chronicle, •■„„,■ h« j.,V.ownPP"i- early in the a ana c conditions were excellent for" 1« fc £-- AUIOUS'I Uu> Weather ws ann, rt lng "r 0 Was a lal'S° LJ^J a ""ttber of spectators being estimated at over 40CO. And it was tho

. I BY "VANGUARD"! ■FOR THE FIRST TEST

NEW ZEALAND TEAM CHOSEN

GOOD WORK OF SOLE SELECTOR

I most silent crowd, without a doubt, I that lias ever witnessed a football matel) lat the headquarters of Wangaiiui ■ ! Rugby. The spectators could and did appreciate the clever play of the Chinese, . but generally they were all at sea when jit carno to following the play continuj ously. After a junior match had been i disposed of, the participants in the ! principal fixture took the field, 'and in physique there was not a great deal be- , tween the players on either side. The I Chinese ' wore quickly into their stride, I and on numerous occasions they were • within goal range, but their shooting was weak, and the local goalie was given some easy shots to field. -When they settled down after the first quarter of an hour the forwards of the visitors showed some delightful footwork- which at-times completely foozled oue or other of t,ie defenders, and they sent in some hard and well directed shots. The combination of the whole forward line, ! and that between the backs and forwards, who were kept well fed, was a feature of the Chinese play throughout and the principal factor in the substan- , tial victory. The Wanganui team was disappointing. They played as individuals rather than as a combination, and it was the lack of cohesive effort," i winch had them three goals down at one stage. In the final ten minutes the home players gave a daahius; display, a though it as if their opponi h ml »neW^??F had the 8«mo well in hand. Visitors to Wanganui from Welington spoke very hiqhTy of the game played by the .Chined last Satu ' day, and contrasted it with the disnlaV taking any risks," he said. "The Cl n CHATHAM CUP .COMPETITION = ?Lt g a-PlaCe lUtho fi-l at Welchurch) and Seiicliff (Dunedfn) pkv n t £?^R^-.id°thi v ctorv t, th?roueh'y Served their \icioiy. Summing up tho m->rrh th*. Palmerston North, which msl 7) sr-^tcf ch^r4^d ™*°™ me match was played under very fair conaitions, and on a dry field' though there was a stiff breeze The better ofttVd^Th^ /W -ao hiSS one^U, tlin^ s^ni^lfX' J£ ri rt 1C- game; f- U" <* »P"Knd ™feU ' . VOpOs't ■" the "Standard" Urts Vel'r ,e, u!°?lStio ref«-e"ces ".to this, player. Gudby is also highly spoken of, and the othor members of the f.f,ward hno also did good work Gamb c felled the vacancy in the half line caused by the absence of Thomas, and assisted Buiko and A. Rudolph (who played centre) in keeping the opposing o" wards ,n check. Fitzgerald and H Rudolph were as solid a pair of b-H-x bLlke"™' a"d n Hif ey «"ed the bill, ! wHI,/P I ■Dilw^ erß were1 successful : spell the Wellington representatives had I wh/ch^ T1 "* a fairy BUff hre ™> winch made progress difficult . The Munawatu team opened the scoring a fi count, Chapman placing a good- goal from a centre from tho rig!,t wing. Aftei that play remained in mid-field for some time, and then Marist equalised with, what the "Standard" termT" d.V appointinß goal. Childs, the ManaM J'Jligott, but. collided with ,1 Jlarist i man ut so doiiiß. Several Dawbers ! players went to hi 3 assistance, thinking that he was hurt, but piny continued, and from a melee Tooo j.)uced tho ball into the Thero was no further score during thu remainder of the spell. With tho strong wind at their bucks, Mar.st soon «w,,cd tho „,) pin. | lillld - ;,; the spro.jrl .spoil, „,,,1 «<,,,!„ cllmo qilick i v . i M'Wlilloa was _ m-ponsiUlo for two! goals in kucc.-ksi,,;,, both scoml clomo up o tho not. '11,,.,, „ „,.oUy. oUy „; ; work by .Han,,,,, (,! (1 .,,,.||,,. llm j ,'.„,,„ „„. ■ suited „, tho l»t.|,.r pluj-or limlin- llm not. Jhu \\cHi,,gt,,n r.'pn-sontiilivoi' niaintiiined tho prossnro i,n cras i,, X lv, and l'«i]w u-.-um „1,1,. 1,,, „M lmi)Uu ,,. to tho totnl. (.ludliy noxt slioiui i'u v ! fine pieco of w,.,Hc <„, H u , |„t l wj ; and when he croivs-lcidvo.l. Havtun shot and hustled Uu\ cimlndinii. liiislollo seized .the opportiiiiily ut ouw, mid iminuig up | 10 luldfd 1.1 i,. MnishiiiH touchy to a very lint! pi'i'funimnoo. Ucl'mo |.| l(1 same i:oiioltidnl Heursoy «curi<il I'mUawburs from n . nonior-Uirk, ' iiml tho linal result was: jMnrist 5. Duwluti-n '■' The final of tho tjonth Islninl >w.. lion of tho Chatham Cup i-ompotit.iou was played at Culling I'ml-, Dnuodin ; on Saturday, botweon Seucljft' (tho tir»t winners and present holdero of tlio I

trophy) and Sunnyside (Christ-church), before an attendance of over 800espectators. The game \v;ia cleanly contested, smd was one of the finest exhibitions of Soccer witnessed in Duuediti for some time. Great enthusiasm was manifested in the play, which was fast and nippy. As the score—l goal each—indicates, the ga-nio was evenly contested, although in vie early stages it appeared as if Seaeli/f would triumph. Sunnyside, however, greatly improved, and their short passing tactics and clever footwork were very effective, and rave them a slight advantage on the day, but they lacked a good scoring centre to finish their attacking movements. Callagan, in goal for Sunnyside, gave a splendid display, and Gould (left back), Thompson, and fcond, in the halves, and M'l.achlau, Browning, and Mixen.in the forwards, were prominent. Seacliff were meeting Uie stiffest team they had yet played, and whilst their attacks lacked the cohesion of those of their opponents, they ■received better support from their halves, llanlin. Hooper, Simmons, and M'Dougall played well in the forwards, Murray and Rogers (halves), and G. Anderson (right back) were the-most prominent in the back division. The game was extended a quarter of an hour each way, but there was no difference in the scores, and the match will probably be replayed. The rules of the Chatham Cup competition provide that the match should be played on the following Monday, but as members of the Sunnyside team were unable to secure extended leave, it was found impossible to do this A replay will probably take place at feomo future date. NEXT YEAR'S ENGLISH TEAM. Agreement with the views of "Vanguard in regard to the visit of an English team next season is expressed, by a correspondent. He says :—"Your remarks in last Saturday's column regarding the English visit • next season ' proved very interesting and timely, and I qmto agree with all you state. "There is no doubt that there is a real danger ■ of a side being- sent below the strength | which many expect. And the reason: this may happen is because we under-.: rate the standard of play in New Zeaiancl. We are continually being told by people from Home that it would be a shame what a first-class team would do to us; that we barely know the rudiments of the game, and so on Thi<= to my mind, is all 'bosh/ put the pity is tnat the great majority who have never < seen Home football believe it to be true If we think this, there is the danger that the people who control the same at Home will do the same, and send out a team which, they think . suitable 'for a small country, 16,000 miles away, which tv, i? r frs , as regards tiie §ameIn English football there is a glamour about the players, caused throuWi the ■huge crowds and the enormous publicity given to the game that is liable to make th, e. a™?Se spectator over-rate the pla'v-erp-.alnhty. I will admit that the^roiessiqnal teams arc much supsrior, 'but I not to the extent that many think The main reason of that superiority is because of. the intensive training/- compul- I sory practice, massaging,' etc that is P?, rt «°w >«»«■ daily routine I con- | wore' t If ,thCiPick Of New Z«^*\ \\eae put on to the same serious trainin- for a spel in the hands of a good I coach there is no English team that would make hacks of them. I can hear the scoffing laugh, but would remind wfiY f, th, c old s? yin- <that h ~ iaughs last laughs best.' What of the thf tSK a Bd dou. btin S Thomases' when the 1900 Rugby team- left'these shores? English team next season a good and it will have to be a stron* one to ensure success on the field and equally ! important, at the gate. An - Elfish visit has been looked forward to t Z & "I'!?- thel? hjls been SD much talk about, their standard of play that a weak team would be a calamity It is to be, hoped that Mr. A. E. Gibbs omrepresentative at Home, has beY well advised as _to the improvement m the standard oi play here, as owin- to his many years absence from the Domini™ he cannot be expected to be in touch with the game-here at the present time It has improved during the last few years by leaps and bounds, but it would receive a serious setback if the visitors are chosen from a social ins cad o f n playing pomt of view."

There is no question that on this season's form Scottish Wanderers a"c dvi for promotion from Senior B to Senior A grade next winter, but the gene -a statement that they play senior A foot tad must be qualified; they would play much bet er senior A football (and senior football for that matter, in spite of their won 12, lost o,.goals for 63, agains 10, so far) were the virtues of their play rather more evenly s h ared by defenders as well as attackers. Their forcTit'^n hom PS0'"' Howiton; Lothian. Udbraith, and Bradshaw, l ilst Saturday played particularly pretty football ..gainst Seatoun, quite outclassing them, > Lu en halves-^«au, M'Bougall, and Arthbutlmot-played merely ord nary football, and their backs-tWaTa"d Hemlry-were rather weak at times though as beatoun did not drive their attacks home with any remarkable vigour, the weakness there was not disas-

Of tho Soatouii men Knowles-Smith, at ontaido right, played the brightest fool ball but sufficient support w° as not givou him, and Houston, Thompson; and Logan marked him consistently. Generally, tho. boatoim front liners appeared to Jack an understanding with each other, and, moreover, lost many likely chances of getting away through • hesitation. Ho who hesitates iv Soccer may not himself be lost, but inevitably the ball is lost as fur as lie is concerned, which, from the team point of view, is almost as important. Towards the end of the match Seatoun'a forwards moved off in better style, going right past the halves, but failing before goal, or seeing their chances go when a Wanderer back, pressed solidly, booted hard across fiold_ to tho side line. Had their uiulcralniuling and passing tactics been more thorough, the way would often hnvo been clear, as far as the* goalkeeper, at any rate.

Tim ranks of professional soccer players taking part iv county cricket in England continue to be swelled, but there | iiro do/.ens more who operate in lesser'l sphoiw of Ilia bat and ball game. Not j inuny achieve international rank at both sower nml cricket. 1 • think Andy Hiical. is tho only one still playing both t.'.mni's who has this distinction to his I'lvdil, A few years back Makepeace and Sharp ■ (Kvorton and Lancashire), Hardingu (Arsenal and Kent), and C. B. ' I'Yy timid 1)d included in tho list. Sharp uiii'il to play a wonderful game on the \ winu for Kvorton, and Makepeace was a i tilorlmg half-back. Sharp, of course, now euptuius the Lancashire Cricket Glut), wliila his old Everton colleague is j number one ou tho batting list. J

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19240809.2.141.2

Bibliographic details

SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 35, 9 August 1924

Word Count
2,892

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 35, 9 August 1924

Working