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NOTES AND COMMENTS

(BY "VEDETTE.")

'Although Income did not please the track watchers at Riccarton- .yesterday morning in. his schooling gallop over hurdles with Boomerday, it may be as (Well not to throw Him into the discard &oo prematurely. In the first place, he jjivas sent to gallop with inexperienced horses over hurdles in Silent King and SJoomerday, Silent King's rider did'not survive tho first fence, while Boomerday could not by any 'Stretch of imagination ,he. called a g00d... schoolmaster.* If H. Kiray goes to thoJposfc on .Income- iv the National Hurdles, it seems safe 'jto assume that Income is a proficient Jfcncer, for even under the- most favourable conditions it is not likely,to be an 'armchair ride. ' : •;

• Lochella is still being kept -to steady ;work on the flat at Riccarton. Schooling .for such. a. proficient jumper does seem \a little superfluous, and he-will go. to Sic post a very fit horse... .

': Bollford was put over four hurdles at SJdccarton yesterday morning, his display being to the liking of..the touts. ,31.ere ar.&-decided possibilities about this gelding. ' . " '^Prompter/ who 'galloped: well -with ISsispado"at Eiccarton yesterday mornran an"extraordinarily good race at JEneatbam last month, when, after get.Jting very badly away, he finished third io Kilfaire and Knighthood in the Crof,ion. Handicap. He is engaged in the {minor events at Riccarton, and in the i'Avonliead Handicap the first day is set \k> carry 9.10. ■

I Sir George. Clifford's "filly Wild Hind, &y Antumnus from Kirriemuir, has gone Wrong, and will- be sent1 to Stonyhurst. JStadi.^'Sbe was. a speedy; galloper, but jiSdiiot "achieve as much' success on' the Bwing^trapkv as she.should:have.,done.';

,It is^iepoited'.from. Christchurch that Ifee- -'CaS'£erKu'£y. Jockey Gliib. has feo increase 'the" charge.for. admission;to (the outside .enclosure, at .\foccartori at Vhe -Grand National .Meeting from- ls; tb: &. ";• ■• -■■-•'■ ■-..: ■". .■: ;

f j&s- is customary, the'fields -at' the Metropolitan Trotting .'.Club's Meeting, at iAddington, which, commerices on ■Saturday, .will be,rather too-large. The!club Sias endeavoured, in framing. ..its--pro-grammes for this .season,'to. keep, the' Vlifilds down, and the limits:-short, by .in-. Itrodncing a system of class .racing. In fane race there, is a range of .108 yards and another of 96 yards, but in the remaining' races' the fields have been Jsgpt well together.

.' Th© following was written by the ISydnoy writer' "Poseidon" oil 24th ij-oly;:—"Had she been asked Glentruin, i%h© flyer-from New Zealand, could have 'improved -considerably on her showing ,Wr" Inree' furlongs at Eandwick this 'morning. She easily ran that distance 'in 41 seconds. Her action .was greatly ijMhmred. ■ The mare is fast getting into racing trim, and it is expected that sbe will be strongly fancied tor. the .Warwick Stakes, a six-furlong weight-'for-age event, with penalties and allowances, which, will be run at Randwick on 6th September. • • Peter Amans has been turned out -lor •■» spell. Before the Great Northern .Steeplechase fixture of last year he ipromised to be a really good horse over ihnrdles, but he has proved an, unreliable (jumper, and was responsible for. • the death of M. D. O'Shea. There -aresome people who say very.unkind thiiigsabout Peter Amans. The only race ho (won last season, was a. mile welter -at JDargaville. . ,- .-- • Riding engagements atmoiinced for tho Grand National ; Meeting are'B. tt. .Mortis for Solifonn in the Winter Cup, and A- J- M'Miim for Weeta in his "engagements at Eiccarton.. .

' Daring the seven seasons Mr. W. E. Kemball has had horses carrying. his colours, they have won stakes amountfag to £58,953.. . " These figures may peem very imposing, but the Masterton towner has raced so extensively, with •(two separate training establishments, that it is quite probable there is-a very ysmall margin of profit, if any. Then, bs a Northern writer remarks, there are always the demands of the Tax' Commissioner to be considered, no light considleration at that.

'.' fThere are some people who do not beiEeve in luck, but I never came across a. man identified with racing who sought to question' that luck does not play a "great part both in the ownership . 01 (hoises and in pursuing the great sport, jrarites "Phaeton." Bitalli, of whc»i ideath. wg received intelligence from Mcl- ■ bourne, furnishes a' case in point. The Randwick trainer J. Burton was the .■breeder oE BitallL, and ho raced the gelding up to the back end of- his four-jyear-old career without being able to fsrin a single race with him. In the space of ii'few weeks after he changed Sands Bitalli won a race worth something like ' £1500, and the Melbourne Cup, to which -was attached £10,288 ns tthe -winner's portion, was added to his total in the.same year. As. the breeder and first trainer of Bitalli, Mr. Burton should have been the one to reap the golden harvest, but that fell to a. man Jwho, there is. some reason to believe, jpever even cast eyes, on Bitalli until |ho bad .."been bought on his account. tLujck of lhe: first.order, truly.

A Sydney writer, iv commenting on ffactful's. victory at the Rosehill Meetiing, naively remarks that'the Lucullas igelding's connections are- not heavy bet(tors, this because'the horse drifted.a 'point or two in the betting. • There are ithose in New Zealand who will agree jthat horses trained by J. Williamson are {usually well supported when they win,. and possibly some of the S.P. books in Sydney would tell an interesting story jabout Tactf ul's win. ' In the race Tactjful drew N0....1..at the barrier, and won jeasily, further victories if he had not.met with aJi accident a few flays later. . . ! According to a Sydney writer, Chignon and Nincompoop, the two-year-olds jin R. J. Mason's charge at Eandjvick, frre more lorward than the majority of [the Australian youngsters. I Since the popular ' Palmerston North jfcrainer^George.Price, settled in Sydney jahout two years ago he has achieved jquite.a Jair measure- of success. He has p ]arge;team in work at Randwick, and lended up the season with a- good win jwith Cdllaroi at Eoseliill, ten days a*;o. Price took Loyal Irish and The .SlTag (to Australia in 1922, and won races with [both of them, and since then he has (been, successful with Stony, Piers Plowpan, Buckra, Winflbag, Pittswortlj, Cool Time, Collai-oi. Medicus, and Quest [Apparently he has started the ' 1924-^.5 season "well with Windbag, a winner at jMooveficld last Saturday.''

Kick Off is still resting' at Napier The Ron of All Black .and "Fair ftdsarnond hns'been blistered, and from present appearances, he. should stand another {^reparation.- __ Kilkenny Lass. Motley's elder sister, as in work again in Sydney, and is look'fed ouaa a likely -winner of some good Isainjfc- - 'racgs -this BeaaoiL, Aaottej

speedy representative of Absurd in Bathos is' again" one of the active brigade at llnndwiek after a good spell.

Master Peter, aJthougu not actually in the 'limelight in regard' to tho Grand National Steeplechase, is :i fairly freely discussed candidate. There were some who alleged that he looked backward at the . .South_ Canterbury Stoeulcchaso "Meeting, but 'for' a'backward horse bo showed surprising muscular development, and little signs oi' distress after his race. Five days later at Wnimatc he carried 12.3 over two and a half miles, and won after a good finish with Sherlock. Master- Peter will strip a-much fitter.' liorsc .next-week.'tlian some, would have us believe. His record twelve-months ago at Riccarton was second with 9.2 in tho Grand National,' first with 9.13 in tho Beaufort Steeplechase, and second with 10.9 :iii the, Lincoln Steeolechase.

It would ■ see that tho legalisation of the totalisator, in" Victoria is further away than, ever, for .although the machine had a fair number of friends in the .last Chamber, they have dwindled down to almost negligible proportions in the new House. ■'■■•-

Bedonia, an A.J.C. Derby candidate and., a recent winner in Sydney, has something of interest' to New Zealand - erg,' Bedonia is "by Limelight from Placidity, by the great sprinter Machine Gun. All Placidity's stock.so Jar have been winners over short courses, and Bedonia, in conformation, carriage, and action, is stated to suggest the sprinter rather than the stayer. For all that, ho may provel an exception to the rule, and would not be the first .doubtful stayer to win a Derby at Randwick. Bedonia is trained by J. Gainsford, who won the 1903 Great. Northern Derby on the Soult horse Wairiki. .

•M. M Carten and C. Emerson have been, nothing if not consistent during--wie .last two seasons. Twelve months Ago they were in first and second places m.-the winning jockeys' list with 52 and 45 successes, while the season just closed saw them dead-heating on the 47 mark Oood reports are received of a' two-year-old filly by Cart Rosa from Chlorine, owned and trained by Mr J JJobbs, -ofr-JJatangi.. A yearling, halfsister.by Swift Bight in the same ownership also promises well. . Track watchers at Eiccarlon will have .something to reward them daily until next Saturday. Proceedings will not h a quite so interesting as in the old days when there was no curtain-raiser m the shape of a hunt: meeting, but there will ue still, a fan- -amount of schooling over, hurdles and fences, as well as some.gopd galloping on the flat An interesting item of. English raeiti" taw was i-evealed when a suggestion was made that Fred Darling, the trainer of JLom Pinch; should ride that coll in the JJerby It appears that a trainur licensed by the Jockey Club cannot ride m races as well. Darling had been nding lorn Pinch in his work, and the combiimtiou had proved a happy on». Jom Pinch sho.wed-at Ascot that the good opinions of him were not unfounded wmmng . the St.', James's PalaceMakes (one mile) from the Derby second ,? mi£ ns in Sood style. Sansovino won the Pni.ce of Wales Stakes on the same day.- Later in the meeting Torn Wrich lost casto again by going under to .twelve Pointer and My Lord in the ilous Memorial Stakes.

1 ranee made a determined effort to lift the Ascot Gold Cup this year with live of the eleven competitors," Massine. Inlibert . tie." Savoie, .Le. Capucin, ' Eosij Innce, and, Mon Petit, the two first-' flamed finishing, first and second' after a good finish. Writing after the race, ■•• vigilant," m the "Sportsman," struck a pessimistic note as follows: "My 'often-expressed opinion that unless something is done to encourage breeders to produce thoroughbreds more stoutly bred we. shall soon have no high-class stayers in the country was surely justified by the result." .

■ Pleasure is expressed in the Australian papers that The Hawk is going back, to the Commonwealth to race. The Hawk at all times was a horse with a personality—as one understands ' that rather nebulous quality—and apparently he has made, the same favourable impression on Australian racegoers. New Zealand-bred horses were at the head of the quotations for the Epsom and Metropolitan When the last mail left Sydney. The Monk was the actual favourite for the mile race, while Ballymena and several others were at the head of the list in the Metropolitan. The Monk won eight races last/season, of the value of £9759. ■

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Bibliographic details

NOTES AND COMMENTS, Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 32, 6 August 1924

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NOTES AND COMMENTS Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 32, 6 August 1924

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