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SANSOVINO'S DERBY

A POPULAR WINNER

IMMENSE ENTHUSIASM

1787-1924.

(rROXI OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

LONDON, 6th June.

No owner of a Derby winner—save the King—could be a more popular man than Lord Derby, and he was overwhelmed with congratulations .by all his friends in the Jockey Club stand when Sansovino, the favourite, got past the winning post on the Epsom course, ehowing everything else a clean pair of heels. For Lord Derby it was a great day, and .it was for special reasons that the victory was so popular. One hundred and fcrty-one years ago his family gave the name to this annual event; several years later it gained the coveted trophy, but was 137 years ago—Sir Peter Teazle, in 1787! Since then, until two days back, the gap had never been bridged. It was not for lack of trying, for successive generations of Stanleys have been among the most public spirited supporters of the Turf, and they have not been iess ambitious than others. The present Earl got second place last year with Pharos, and now Sansovino—almost a last-hour favourite —secured for him the long-hoped-for blue ribbon.

During the early stages of the race— preceding which there were two false starts—Lord Derby, who has been out of health, and who was in the Jockey Club enclosure, sat quietly, hearing from enthusiastic friends how all was going. With their powerful field glasses they could scrutinise the start and follow the progress of the race. " Dawson City leads—well ahead—Sansovino draws near—now they are . level—Sansovino's in front—he's leading to Tattenham Corner—he's round first —lengths ahead —he's already won !" As the runners draw near Lord De,rby rose and saw the winner passing the grandstand, forging ahead still, and" apparently untroubled by the heavy going. To.the onlookers none of, the other twenty-seven-runners deemed much to matter for the moment. It was a sight to see the black »nd white of the Derby jacket leading a procession of horses which were now hopelessly trying to improve their position and make the champion come back to them. A wonderfully-popular victory had been gained in a. canter by 'six lengths from Lord Astor's St. German's, which had been rather late from the gate. ■ . . - PBOGBESS DIFFICULT. Victory achieved, Ltod Derby, amid the most enthusiastic congratulations, made his way with difficulty from the stand, through the jockeys' enclosure, and along the course, to lead in the victor and his. jockey. His return journey, even with the escort of mounted police, was' difficult, because followers were many, and Weston thought the saddle would be dragged from under him, so keenly did the people pull on both . sides.

"Thank you so'much! Thank you so much !" How many times did "the owner .of Sansovino graciously utter the remark! By the time of his return one could see that he was quite overwhelmed with the victory and with tho vociferous and generous reception. In the weighing-room he congratulated Weston, patting him on the shoulder. Ihe jockey, who hail done the right thing and left nothing to chance, said: ' The only doubt I ever had was when my horse seemed outpaced in tho first half-mile. 'But I was enabled to pick up ground quickly and head Dawson City coming down the hill towards Tattenham Corner. It soon became a canter, and perhaps it is one of the easiestwon De'rbys on record." The Hon. G. Lambton (the trainer) said: " I have felt confident for months past that Sansovino would win. I knew I- had a good horse, who has not yet reached his greatness. Weston knew ■Sansovino so.', well that I gave the lad no riding orders. , I only warned him not "to get shut in. Somebody has just told me, 'You can die happy.' Yes it .is" a. trainer's life ambition."

/Lord. Derby returned^ to the Jockey Club room en routs to'see the King and Mueen, and •> received their warm congratulations. ■ " Then he came back to the 1-ress stand, received more congratulations, and said: " Sansovino is a good horse. He asked to see Mr. Edgar Wallace (chairman of the Press Club) At a. Press Club luncheon earlier ia the veek, every owner had found his racing colour^ ]n rosette form, on his plate Lord Derby, very graciously, asked for JVli. Wallace as he- wanted to show him ±r f ? eW ?, evh7 ?«»Bcot»-thi». same losette, which he had carried i n his breast pocket ■ It was the gracious and thoughtful act of a gentleman, and was much-appreciated. At tho same luncheon he had said: "With regard to my own horse, I can only say that he « very well^ I know I have got a good jockey, and I know also that I have got the best trainer m England. (Cheers.) Last year I told you that if you backed my horse you would have a good run or your money. I tell you the same thing again now. I think if you back yormo ni°er wilniav6agoJ ™i£°"

A GENEROUS WINNER. Lord Derby never bets, but he will always let his friends know when he h s -.1 good chance of winning. He breeds all the horses he runs, and has only had one trainer, the Hon. George Lamb on during the whole of hU racing ca ee ' Although this is hi, firs t DeYby, ] c has done well on other courses Hit MM tdl,ooO. Of late years ho has

THE WINNER^ BREEDING note that both Sansovino and St Ger mans are sons of Swynford, who has now consolidated'hi. p ; s j t ; on ' J^J™ the best sires at the British stud. Lord £i? y w r dB. a WM! dßrful h™Sai* in 1912 when h 6 purchased the brood more Gondolette from Lord Wave Tee for 3550 guineas. She is by Loved <W out of Dongola.by Doncaster. Lord Be,-.., P , lrchaS e d her mainly on account of lwr Plumage Wood, which he dosired to cross with h is stallions Chaucer and Swynford both also-descendants of Pilgrimiigp.. This line of breeding w .proved marvellously successful, having been responsible) not only for yesterday1? .winner but, for 'iYanquil and Selene. So far the'produce of Goudoletie and her daughter Serenissima have won four classic events for Lord Derby and stakes exceeding £50,000. As a two-year-old bansovmo was seen out only twice He won his- first race at Goodwood.' and then carried off the Gimcrack at York. This year the Derby winner started by winning a small mile and' a half race at Haydock Park, and afterwards was beaten into third place in the Newmarket .Stakes.

Fbw classic htivses have looked more u&jiuseme than BwynlorcL. but eveu if

Sansovino has not quite the magnificent outlines of his sire he has many good points of recommendation, and is" big of frame and of great strength. His trainer did not race him at all hard as a two-year-old, allowing him to mature by easy stages, and thus he has reaped the ieward of his patience. LOED ASTOE'S EECOED OF SECONDS. The owner of Sansovino received no more cordial congratulations than were forthcoming from His Majesty, Lord Astor, the'Aga Khan, and several other owners Whose horses had been so severely trounced. And if there were plaudits for one, what shall be said of tho amazing sequence of seconds in the Derby of Lord Astor? (writes "Hotspur" in tho "Daily Telegraph"). It was in the last year of the war that his horse Blink was second to Gainsborough for the New Derby. The very next year, when the return was made to Epsom, his colours were carried into second place by Buchan. Two years later Lord Astor was second for the third time with Craig an Eran, second for the fourth time with Tanjar in Captain Cuttle's year, and now second for tho fifth time in seven years! Surely that is a record of the wrong sort that will long stand. Lord Astor smiled in defeat, like the good sportsman he is. Certainly he, too, has owned high-class horses, so that defeat in such circumstances has its compensations.

The Aga Khan, was eariy at Epsom, and at one time he had great hopes of victory through the medium of Diophon, but an hour before the race he did not think success would come by this horse because the rain fell continuously and the course was very sodden, this being equivalent to putting extra weight on his back, but perhaps his second entrant, Salmon Trout, would" have a chance. However, he, as well as Lord Astor, took defeat philosophically, Lord Astor remarking : ■ "My fifth Derby second—it is all in the racing game" ; while the Aga Khan said, "Never, mind; there's always a lifetime." SPECTACULAELY DULL. Epsom has become a legend, every year it becomes a more popular venue •not only for folk at home but for visitors from overseas. It was to be regretted, therefore,- that from the weather viewpoint it was a dismal Derby; it could hardly have been much "worse. The scene lacked entirely the brightness and gaiety that usually mark the Downs. A foW costers had turned up in their "pearlies" and there were a certain number of gypsies, but all round and opposite the "vista was one of black umbrellas, some as large as a tent being used' to shelter the "bookies." There was no colour save the crimson of the motor-buses and the green ribbon of the course. Naturally, the pleasure of seeing the horses in the paddock before the race was marred by the unfavourabla weather. Nevertheless, a big crowd made its way to. the spacious enclosure which inarches with the Earl of Eosebery's home at The Durdans. The Prince of Wales and his brothers were among those who made an industrious tour of inspection in the paddock, which they did not leave- until the twenty-seven runners had filed out upon parade. The parade gave the majority of people the opportunity of making a I closer inspection of the competitors than had been possible in the paddock. MUD TO THE AXLES.' The crowds were in good. temper, although many got soaked to the' skin. There were hundreds of motor-buses, gigantic char-a-bancs, and motor-cars. In many instances, when they tried to leave the course, the sodden turf sank under tho heavy wheels. Brushwood, planks, and.anything else likely, to give the tires' a grip, were tried, but it was hours before some of-the heavier vehicles could be moved any distance. Two hours after the last race hundreds of them had been unable to move at all, and. many were' still there ; late last night, the occupants returning to London by train. In the hollow ground inside, the course some'cars wero sunk-to the axles.1 Horses, and, in some cases, motor-lorries, were brought up to pull them off the course. It is believed to have been a record DerbVj so far as crowds, and particularly cars, were concerned, and this added to the difficulties of the traffic problem. TEEATING DISCOMFOETS - LIGHTLY. However, overseas people said they would not have missed- the thrill for worlds. As one of them writes in the "Morning Post": "We Went to see the Derby. We did not see much of it, it ia true. Wo saw the false starts, and we saw Dawson City flash out from the line at the barrier, and we saw Sansovino come sweeping around Tattenham Corner, racing into his bit well ahead of the rest, and flying down the straight as if he liked it. Those wero thrilling moments. W e confess them, with pride, not simply because, we were privileged to see England's finest three-year-olds racing for the Blue Bibbon, but because .we wore 'able to bo present at a scene where all that .was best and most admirable in the British character was revealed.

"Throughout the afternoon, with just a little false promise at 3 o'clock; it rained steadily. The actual discomfort, intolerable as it seemed, was treated simply as a joke. In fact, it became a./ joke. Everything was a cause for laughter, and when the downpour and the clinging mud were also introduced as sallies for fun, Australians understood a lot about the British temperament that they had never appreciated before. Wherever we walked we saw the same waving sea of umbrellas, heard the same 'squelch,- squelch' from the rain-soakeiJ mud, saw the dripping shoulders—and heard the same cheerfulness! I venture to believe that had the same conditions obtained at Flemington on Cup Day they would still have been treated with the same lighthearted quips and laughter. But this is^England, not Fleminglon. . . . "We have a largo country out there ..under the Southern Cross, but we have, not the .same huge population. Therefore, that vast crowd yesterday at Epsom impressed us, thrilled us, made us wonder. Those glistening acres of automobiles, char-a-bancs, and sundry vehicles; those armies massed on all sides of the hill—the vastnesa of it all impressed us, -even as the spirit of the scene had done. And .then there was that control of traffic. Tho London policeman is a never-failing friend of the straying colonial. And again yest.erday we marvelled at the efficiency of the Force." THE DAY AFTER. Yesterday the Downs were littered with derelict mgtor-cars, buses, motorcoaches, and lorries. As the rain fell, it had soaked into the 'ground, and the back wheels of the vehicles gradually sank until the axles touched the earth. The surface had become slimy, and when the last race was over the vehicles could not be moved. The light cars still remained on the surface, but as soon as the engines were started and put into gear the wheels spun round, making holes which held the cars fast. SUPPTA 7 AND DEMAND. Ashes, straw, sticks, ropes, chains to put under or round the wheels, to get, a. grip, were sold Jit prices not even dreamed of during the war. , Otic oi Uic derelicts vvus a coath .jvhiuli

had been brought from Readin" on a lorry.. More than 100 motor-buses were stranded. Motor-coaches from all parts of London, from Brighton and Hastings, from Jissex and East Sussex were among those which spent, a. night on the Downs. Their passengers had returned by tram. An SOS went round the district, and gypsies and farmers arrived with horses to pull out private cars which had stuck.

Some steam cranes were sent down from London and worked all night. -the charge for extricating EollsRoyce, Vauxhall, Daimler, and other luxury cars with saloon bodies was £2. A pound was the general charge, and 10s 6cf for light cars. An enterprising firm from Epsom sent a traction engine, fitted with iron grips about six inches long, and it dragged rat motor-buses and other vehicles at il a time.

They were still working at the derelicts, when the first race was run the next day.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

SANSOVINO'S DERBY, Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 17, 19 July 1924

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2,457

SANSOVINO'S DERBY Evening Post, Volume CVIII, Issue 17, 19 July 1924

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