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ZEV WINS

THE INTERNATIONAL RACE WINNER A WONDER HORSE. (UNITED PRESS ASSOCIATION.—COPYMORT.) (AUSTRALIAN-NEW ZEALAND CABLE ASSOCIATION.) NEW YORK, 20th October. The international horserace was held to-day, Zev (America) beating . Papyrus (England) by four lengths. The distance was one and a half miles, and the time 2mm 35 2-ssec. Following is the time by quarter-miles :—First 23 4-ssec; second, SO 2-s S ec; third, lmin 15s_ec; fourth, Imm 40 4-ssec; fifth, 2mm 7 3-ssec; sixth, 2min 35 2-ssec Few international sporting events in past years have aroused bo much popular interest as this race, which was witnessed by more than 70,000 people one of the greatest crowds in American Turf history The weather was fair but the track was heavy as a result of rain which fell yesterday The previous uncertainty as to whether Zev would run to-day and the summoning of My Own a s a possible substitute wore due to Zev not working well on Wednesday morning, and developing blotches, which it was thought might, be hives The locomotive of the special trom which was carrying My Own from Maryland to Belmoal Pirk jvunped the

track, but so far as known My Own I was unhurt.

The settings for the race had much beauty m them. Belmont's spacious infield, stately trees, and towering stands offered a fine background for the colourful crowd, in which every element of American life was apparently represented.

The -gate receipts totalled 462,000 dollars, of which 190,000 dollars were given in prizes for various races Attempts are being made by Western racing promoters to arrange a race between Zev and My Own, at Christmas, for a 100,000. dollar purse. Three races'.preceded the "Zev-Papy-rug contest, and sufficient indication that the track was in an unfavourable condition was seen when the riders of the horses came back heavily spattered with mud Sande rode a horaf named Osprey m the. third race, and the throng rushed across the field to watch the -tmencan jockey, whose horse, however took only third money' • D°"oghu\and Sande shook hands nist before the trainers saddled Zev and Papyrus. The American horse overtopped the British horse by several inches. Both horses carried 1261b The sun was shining brilliantly wnen the horses trotted out upon the very muddy and heavy track. Zev, who is considered to bo the best mud horse in America, was said to be specially shod with toe tips and caulks, while Fapyrns is- understood to have been wearing smooth plates. Jarvis and Donoghue, however, felt no misgivings as to Papyrus s ability to" negotiate the heavy going. Both horses broke fast as the barrier was lifted, but Zev got into the lead nearly immediately, and led by a length at the first furlong, and another length at the third furlong, but Papyrug steadily climbed forward until they ■ were nearly even at the three-quarters of a mile. Zev then spurted,' and was a length ahead at the mile and two lengths ahead as the two horses came into the stretch to the judge's stand. Papyrus then reached forward and reduced the distance between himself and Zev to a length and a half, but Zev made a final spurt'during the last three furlongs and finished four lengths ahead of his opponent. Although Papyrus ran a game race, he never really threatened &cv, who continued to hold the lead from beginning to end, proving all rumours concerning his bad condition unfounded.

It ia interesting to note that Zev was extremely nervous at the barrier, while Papyrus lived up to his reputation of being quite an unexcitable colt, and gave Donoghue little trouble, while Sande had his hands full with his mount. Some observers declare that Papyrus was in front for the first third of the first furlong, but Zev overtook him with an amazing burst of! speed, : and at the end of the first furlong was in on the rail Neither jockey used the whip, both urging their horses by hand and heel. Zev's victory makes him the greatest American money-earning horse, having won in excess of 250,000 dollars. He wins 80,000 dollars and the International Gold Cup by this race." Tile mud appears to have proved Papyrus's undoing. Observers declared that it clung to. his heels and seemed to hold him down, disrupting all Donoghue's plans and strategy. The horse's unfamiliarity with a dirt track, coupled with th© fact that the dirt, had been turned into mire thick and sticky as molasses, led to his defeat by a large margin. Jarvis was the first to congratulate Sande and Hildreth (the trainer of Zev). The (spectators, while delirious with joy at Zev'a victory, gave Papyrus ana Donoghue a rousing cheer as they cantered off to the stables.

Basil Jarvig, the English trainer, was sorely disappointed at the showing of Papyrus. Ho said that Zev was a winder horse, but he thought that Papyrus would have done better on a faster track. "Tlie stop, which is something we never have on English courses, bothered him. ■ and he was never able to hit his proper stride," Jarvis added. "Wo were fairly beaten by a great horse, and the result might have been the same under any conditions."

Steve Donoghue, who had the mount on Papyrus, declared that Zev was a better and faster horse. Papyrus ran well enough, but lacked speed to match Zev. Donoghue explained'after the race that Papyrus was continually slipping on the miry track.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19231022.2.132

Bibliographic details

ZEV WINS, Evening Post, Volume CVI, Issue 97, 22 October 1923

Word Count
901

ZEV WINS Evening Post, Volume CVI, Issue 97, 22 October 1923

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