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SOCCER

fBV "VANGUARD"!

CHATHAM CUP

•'CHAMPIONSHIP TABLE.

Four local senior teams have entered for the Chatham Cup competition, which is to be decided for the first time this season. They are Waterside, Diamonds, Hospital, and V.M.C.A., and steps are being taken by the local association to decide which' of these is to hav,e the honour of representing Wellington. The question of controlling the Chatham Cup competition has given those in charge of the game of Soccer in Ifsw- Zealand some serious thought, the conditions laid down by the donor being rather unusual, for this country, at least. The conditions are something similar to those under which the English Cup is competed for, teams being called on to travel. Owing to the late start made this season with the competition, it has been found impossible to carry out the conditions strictly, and' the co-operatioi* of tho various associations has been sought with a view to minimising the difficulties of control. The associations have responded very well, and in some centres the .first stageß of the competition have been decided. The local association has received the entries, as indicated above and has decided to play off the preliminary games, in conjunction with their usual club games. If the teams do not meet under these circumstances special nxture, are to be arranged. When each centre has decided which team i 8 to "Present it, the E em|-fina]s will be played off in the various districts, and oy a system of elimination the number of competitors will be reduced to two! S tw° teams will meet in the final, «hich, therru es stipulate, must be' dlnnnf ln .W^'ngton.. This arrangement 1£r SS that-the competition is meetJ"g with the favour ■ of players in all will not bo out of pocket to any great in the 1 a, resui t.f their partlpf fcfon Cg^tf^Shi^^rse^Hh: «*& ♦• ?? inPetition well up to schedule tim 9. Next year, however an "tewil! > m^e' it T s pcssible that entries for cext year's comeptibon will be called for a the end of the present season.

VISITS FROM OVERSEAS. lh e progress that i s being made by 7lVn^ °f S°CCer in all Parts of New Zealand has caused attention to be directoWe^ 6 T eT noi bl? n«inX team, from oveiseas to try conclusions with the thus^still further promote that progress Hopes were entertained early this seafon thai. New Zealand would receive a visit ,S \T m, ? l Chlnese University students but a though the combination will Augtraha according to schedule; it may be stated that as far as New Zealand is concerned, the tour is definitely h« -Hi? 7 S°Uth Wales -ABBociation th, ftv, d/° CoUllten ™<=c the tour of W » BTS as d at a recent meetwnvtl fCT CIJ (? eC'ded *> take up £450 been W m 7? m the Company that''»■ cordin t i * \ Promote the tour. AcZ «r^vt° ?ate| fc, re P°r^ the team is due ™/tfc V"\ Sydne y°n M<">day next, SnWH ' match is to be played on Saturday next. New Zealand 1* nonparticipation in the tour will'mean that "'n*? wUhavo no visit from an outside team this year, but in view of tho big programme that has already to be carried out, including the Chatham Cup competition, ,t j 8 probably as well that this is .so Any disappointment ree i? tho Chinese team will be balanced by the announcement that it seems practically certain that next season New Zealand will receive a visit from a Canadian team, an' organisation that should proyevery popular iv this country. When the New Zealand team w as j n Australia the managers o f the team conferred with the Commonwealth authorities and went very fully, mto the question of bringing a Canadian team to Australasia next season. The matter was taken up.with considerable enthusiasm by all concerned, and the Commonwealth Association agreed to bear half the cost of assembling the team m Canada and. half the cost of boat fares, provided that the. Canadians spend seven weeks in Australia. This arrangement, it is understood, has met with the aDproval of the New Zealand Council which is endeavouring to arrange that a similar time will be spent by the visitors in New Zealand It is considered that a tour of seven weeks will enable visits to be paid to all centres whei;e ; Soccer is on the boom* or in fact, where it is played to any extent at all, and also the playing of three Test matches The Canadian Association has expressed ,t8 willingness to send a team on tour next year, and so far has laid down no special conditions. The New Association, in conjunction with the Australian body, will undertake to pay the cost of assembling the team inCanada, the steamer fares, and the cost of taking them through New Zealand and Australia for three months or so. lher e is little doubt that the visit of the Canadians will be an immense amount of rood both in New Zealand and Australia, lhe standard of play in Canada is said to be very high, resembling the style of Tilay adopted in England, and it is therefore pretty certain that enthusiasts here will see something worth while during the tour. Although New Zealand succeeded' in winning- tho Ashes against Australia, th e record of the tour as a whole was not. auch as to inspire »nr groat, outburst of copflctencn in the pl«.\»r.i that were seat aeriss the Tasman, and if the

FOUR. LOCAL ASPIRANTS

DIFFICULTIES OF DECIDING CHAMPIONSHIP,

New Zealanders are to be worthy opponents for the Canadians and, later, the Englishmen, 'steps will have to be taken to improve the jrame generally. Much depends on .the placers themselves, or, rather, on the individual clubs. "Vanguard" has mentioned the question of practice before, and he mentions' it again, with emphasis. In Wellington several clubs have taken steps this season to properly fit themselves for their engagements, and it is these clubs that are at the head of the championship ladder. A notable example is the Waterside Club, the members of which take the field and leave it as fit as the proverbial fiddle. The necessity for fitness cannot be over-emphasised, and the example set by the Waterside Club and other clubs should be followed in all parts- of New Zealand. There is little doubt that the public is- gradually if slowly, turning to the Soccer game,' and that some day it will .seriously rival Rugby as a popular winter sport. That being so, players should see to it that they give the public the best display they possibly can. An uninteresting contest, in which the teams tire before the first spell is half over, does an incalculable amount of harm. It is noted with satisfaction that the Wellington. Association has decided to give the members of the" Wellington Shield team an opportunity of training before they go to meet Auckland on 18th August, and it will be interesting to see if the idea bears fruit.: At any rate, it can do no harm and the local association is to be commended om the^ attitude that it has adopted. .For some time past endeavours have been-. H made by the; Australian; ; O nd''Ne-yvi Zealand associations to secure' a visit' from an English team, but so far little success has attended their offorts a a. result duo mainly to the selfish attitude that has been adopted by the Football Association at Home. • Such a, visit W°l £. ba in the nature of a mission to put the rrame on a sounder basis in Aus-. tralasia, and it might reasonably be expected that the parent body would gladly undertake such a mission, which would be of immense benefit to the game, and the results of which should cause considerable satisfaction to all those who wt V - £ c» Sam- e really ai hear<" The Association, however has refused to assist the New Zealand Association financially or otherwise, and the tour stul remains a thing of the future— perhaps rather distant future. Originally it was hoped to secure a visit from a, team <jt professionals, but the-expense of such an undertaking has ruled it v v ,c fluxion, and the best thatr could be hoped for now.would be a .visit. irom a team composed of amateurs, with, say, three or four professionals. A proposal has. been mooted that the New Zealand Association ; should approach some of the English clubs with a view to their avowing some of their members to make the trip during the off-season, °r iT U J. pay- U h Pointed O ut that the clubs have to pay their men,during the summer months, and that it would be an act-of grace if they gave one or two of them leave .to- travel. This would set over the difficulty that would bo experienced by the New Zealand Association in paying wages to the professionals during the time they wjjre on the water and m New Zealand. It surely would not be asking too much of some of the English clubs to agree to this course. Certainly a team containing a few professionals would prove a greater attraction than a purely amateur team. Of course there are some • who throwup,their hands and say'that New Zealand would noUiave a chance against a third grade_ English eleven, but how can that be said when New Zealand has not been given a chance of showing what can he done? Some day perhaps,. New Zealand and England will meet on the Soccer field, and even if New Zealand goes down by ten goals to nil the game will not have been in vain. .NOTES. ' • The Hospital team returned from the South Island last Saturday morning,' so as to be in time for their League fixture, but the clerk of the weather intervened and gava them a mich-neded rest. After playing and defeating Sunnyside 2-1. Jit Christchurch, the team was "splendidly entertained by the staff. Amongst"the guests vjere Mr. English, president of the Canterbury Football Association, and Mr. Bunt, chairman. The next morning the team was motored to the station,* and travelled by the early express to Seacliff. On arrival, they were met by a large-, crowd, including officials of the institution. The next day the match was played under ideal conditions, although the. ground was heavy. The Seacliff team is a very strong one, includ-. ing.four Otago representatives. -.Hooper, late of Auckland, and of last year's New Zealand team, is the centre forward. The ground is very small, and seemed to bother the Porirua team for some time, but they soon got used to it, and gave a fine exhibition. The first thirty minutes was mainly in favour of Seacliff,- ---• who, led by Hooper, showed fine combination, and only the stubborn defence of Porirua, particularly Gibb and Kissock, kept them out. The former player greatly impressed everybody throughout the trip as full-back, and Southern critics were loud in their praises. Porirua then commenced to assert themselves, and the forwards, ably supported by tho halves, gave the Seacliff defence a solid time. The game again fluctuated, and both goals were visited rapidly in turn, until at last, from a splendid movement, Lambert netted the first goal. Tli.e second half was well in progress before there was any further score, and then Porirua, through the agency, of Ferguson, made the score 3-0 In their favour. Towards the end Hoop-er-eecured, after good combination, and

beating the opposition, made the final score 3-1. A feature of the game was the splendid refereeing of Mr. M. Pollock, of Dunedin. The game was generally voted one of the best seen in Otago for many a, long day, Mr. Pollock referring to it as the fastest game he had controlled during ten years" experience.

The next day the team was motored in private cars to Dunedin, -where a team from the combined hospitals met an Otago team at Culling Park. The Hospital team was: Trewick, J. Anderson, Gibb, G. Anderson, Kissock, Gibson, Dick, Ferguson, Hooper, Murray, Lambert. Dunedin: Scott, Dickel, Coates, Johnson, Cherry, Baldock, M'Mullan, Ruddiman, Newman, Donaldson, Hanlin. The weather, unfortunately;, broke during the morning, and frequent, heavy showers of rain fell during the match, and the gate was adversely affected The game was very strenuous aad lull of good football, surprisingly good, considering the state of the ball and the ground. Hospital scored first, through Dick, who found the net with a nice rising shot. Dunedin drew level through the agency of a penalty, Donaldson giving Trewick no chance with his shot. Shortly after, Hanlin put the home team in the lead, and then, just on half-time, Hooper made the scores level. Ihe second half was also well contested and in the last fifteen minutes Hospital had very hard luck in not gaming the lead. Ferguson made the Hospital score 3-2, but a few minutea later Newman made the scores level again, and the match ended in a draw The return journey to Seacliff wat made under conditions quits new to many members of the team. Dunedin was left in heavy rain, and crossing the hill heavy snow was encountered, which made the l.ghts of Seacliff .vei'y welSome very fine outstanding players were met by Hospital during their trip South. At Sunnyside they htve a splendid goalie m T Jackson, He is lacking in inches but his agility, resourcefulness, and determination more than compensate. His brother, at left-back :s also a very fine player, and both have played M big^clubs in Ireland. Batten, Newell and Bull make a strong halfhne The former is late of Porirua and Waterside Clubs. The forwards were splen&d, with Purdy and Mizen the stars At Seacliff the Anderson brothers, at full-back, are great players, and stand out above the rest of the team. Ihey are big, upstanding men, and c 3 Perfeot understanding with each other. Murray was the pick of the halves, and is a very,useful man, and he can also play a splendid game at inside-left position. Hooper was the most noticeable forward, and is fast and always dangerous. . In conversation with some Otago officials last week, I was informed that ;4hey.were quite looking forward to a visit from the Wellington representatives _th>s season. ; The arrangements are> I believe, -only tentative," so if iV hoped that something definite will 'be arranged as soon as. possible. The O.F.A. seems anxious, for more reasons than one, that the visit should eventuate, and there is no doubt" it would give the game a much-needed boost in Dunedin. . . .

Tottenham Hotspur" are carrying out further improvements to their ground during the close season. As soon as the League programme finished workmen took possession of the enclosure and -were to put a roof over the unprotected end. When this work is completed there will be accommodation for over 30,000 people. It is not generally known that the two concrete terraces at the ends of the White Hart lane ground are hollow, and that underneath there is provision for shops with windows facing on to: the roads. Only one end is at' present occupied, and this is used as a blouse factory and a furniture store. Further improvements are contemplated as soon as the conditions will permit. Some time ago the club bought the row of houses, the backs of which" look on to' the field, with the idea of pulling them down and putting up another big stand on the site. Owing to the shortage of houses they cannot yet be demolished; but as soon as they are available the construction of the new stand will be begun at once The ground will then hold over seventy thousand people, and. it will be oca <if the finest, though, of course, not the largest, in the Old Country, _ An English authority wyites: "It has become the custom of referees to penalise the player who is o/f-side, whether he is .'interfering' with the play or not. Inis, of course, is not according to rule, but it is not an easy matter in many cases to decide when the interference begins. When a pass is made tc- the centre-forward who is correctly placed, and the play is stopped because, say, the outside-right is off-side, that strikes one as a foolish decision. On the other hand, suppose the man off-side is the inside-right. * He may not interfere, and yet.gain an advantage through ms position when'it becomes a legal one. There is.another position which is difficult to determine. Suppose the ball is kicked to a man who is off-side, and he does not attempt to play it. The backs, knowing, that they have nothing to fear, do not hurry to clear, and before they do so another opponent who is on-side rushes through and gains position. In such a case as that, what should be the decision of the referee? It is. a nice point, because it is certain that the second player only secured the ball owing to the false position of his colleague. If a free-kick were given, there would surely be a demonstration against the referee, but, the decision would probably be correct."

I have been asked to repeat, with emphasis, some remarks made a fortnight ago in regard to rough play in evidence during a senior grade match,! and to.appeal to referees to protect players by firmly putting down any suggestion of unfairplay, whether'it be open ov "shrewd." There should, of course, be no need to make any such appeal, for if a referee sees such work going on he will at once very definitely .put a stop to it, but it is not possible for the man in_ charge of the game to see every detail of the ninety minutes' play. Without a doubt there was far too much leg and ankle work in the game in mind, and it was not confined to one side by any means. The ideal team will be unaffected by the unnecessarily unpleasant knocks handed out by its opponente but Wellington has.yet to,lay claim to eleven.men whose mental make-ups entitle them to a description, of. the ideal team—and never will get together a side with tho spirit,of retaliation quite trained out of it-rand it rests with the man with the whistle to see that no cause is given for tho firing up of that firmly ingrained spirit of retaliation.

w . . . .P- W.. I. D. For. Agst. Pts. Waterside ... 8 9 n n iv n ia Hospital 9 s • " i ?? -if. if SilJK?*- » 5 5 11610 lS vm?* ,? * 2 2 15 17 10 Kimii —10 . 3 4 3 21 21 9 f r "°r' 108 6 2 16 21 8 S"[i s*j 9 0 4 5 10 20 6 Welgasco B 0 7 2 6 35 2

Senior A.

p. Institute ...:.. 10 Scot. Wander. 10 I'orirua 10 3th. Wgtn. ... 10 Brooklyn 9 Island Bay ... 9 3wift3 9 X.M.C.A. ...... 10 W. L. D. For. Agst. Pts. 9 -1 0 38 6 18 7 2 1 25 13 15 * , 2 4 U 15 12 1 3 3 19 15 11 3 3 3 22 16 8 2 0 1 11 22 5 I 5 3 13 20 6 1 8 1 8 36 8

Senior. B,

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Bibliographic details

SOCCER, Evening Post, Volume CVI, Issue 30, 4 August 1923

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3,197

SOCCER Evening Post, Volume CVI, Issue 30, 4 August 1923

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