Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE DERBY "HAT TRICK"

DONOGHUE'S THIRD SUC-

CESSIVE WIN

A DAY AT THE DOWNS

TRIUMPH OF TRAFFIC CONTROL.

(JROK OCR OWN COXREsroNOtKI.*)

LONDON, 15th June.

Many visiting New Zealanders found their way to Epsom on Derby Day. There are several ways of joining in this great national festival, and much depends upon, the method adopted. For the pressman, who has the best of everything free of cost save for his train ticket and personal refreshment, it is difficult to understand why the hundreds of thousands congregate on the Downs, perhaps only to see a few coloured tunics flash by through an aperture in the crowd at long intervals. But they do. There are the more fortunate who can afford a ticket in a motor omnibus,' and possibly get a. view of the races from the top. Still more fortunate are those who are able to pay for a ticket on the public stands, but even they must perforce hold fast to their seats all day. On the main grandstand is Tattersall's Ring where the bookmakers and the serious betting people' are to be found. Next to them, is the Jockey Club enclosure, where the Royal Box is and the tophatted community is to be found with their friends. In a smaller enclosure are to be found the trainers, the owners, jockeys, and Press; AU the people oi the main grandstand have the privilege of possessing a paddock ticket, but the remainder of the- Derby crowd know nothing of the pleasures of this green, pleasant area, where the Prince of Wales and a large proportion of the rest of the titled people of Great Britain make a . more or less serious study of the competing racehorses. It was interesting to notice that while- in. the paddock the Prince had the privilege of a private person, and if any special notice was ' taken of . him it was merely a furtive glance. As he walked up the course to the box again, however, the crowds* in the public stands cheered enthusiastically. Yet with all these distinctions of outlook, there is something* altogether democratic' about the-day's festivity. Luxurious cars, wagonettes, donkey carts, char-a-bancs, and buses are mixed tip indiscriminately on the fairly long trek that starts for Epsom at an early hour. On the Downs people who have their private cars, people *who have come in their ' tradesmen's carts, and the general public who have come by train or bus picnic side by side, and they all see equally little of the races. Possibly they enjoy themsolves more than the real enthusiasts, who come very early and take up their long vigil firmly against the fence on the inner side of the course. As the crowd increases all hope of retreat is cut oft", i There these unfortunate ones must stay with the pressure gradually growing greater and greater behind them. They have their reward.

IMPRESSIONS OF THE GIPSIES. For a large proportion of the people on the Downs the races are a secondary consideration. There are tents with innumerable barrels of beer, there are ■cpppnp.fr* shies, there are bookmaker* overy_ few yards, and the humble shilling is taken as a wager as readily as the pound note. The raoo itself is of no importance; it is the result of the race that counts Gipsies are always concentrated on the outer side of the straight' •days before the event. Their caravans are clean and gaudily painted, but, alas the owners and their children are dirty beyond belief. No doubt there is romance m these nomadic people, but a first impression is not a good one Intants in arms are depressing to look at, and the medley of clothing that goes to cover the vonnger members of the family ■is wonderful to behold. However, cleanhness i 3 a matter of taste. nn^ h nf °Od W!" C1 1 '? hea Ped in th« booths and the peripatetic baskets is not altogether seductive, but it is, no doubt profitable to the vendor. Chefs shouted things about the old firm as they fri!i « u 6 0118 °f stewed eels. Cold fried fish, whelks, hard-boiled e"°s sandwiches, meat pies, cake, and fruit at least keeps the hunger away, and were sold for considerably more than their value. One could not help con testing some of the menus. S.I private dining-rooms luxurious lv"! cheons were being served, and one tab"c which was only obtained after pVelsW the actions or demeanour of oS

THE ROAD TO EPSOM. Summer months have b°en with »„ f some time, but summer weather has i^t PCM the station of departure The t? payment of a visit to Epso^r/ercy

As for the road traffic, a novel feature th» year was the experiment oi Ztioll ng by an ingenious combination^ wireless between an aeroplane a police tender on the road, and a nol ca iZI on the grandstand.' Many ™ were received by the tS ™X from the aeroplane. These r.n / j small blocks i/the. traffic at Triofs place B ; and motor-cyclists were dilpatch ed from stations along the route to divert traflic where necessary. Shortly after noon reports showed that th-. j traffic was heavier than last yearC were over 5000 motor coache, near the course from all over the country, and ands. A.tour of the course was a lion wl education in the history 0^ Voto r " veh.de.. There you had displayed °! the stages in the evolution of meclianiri) transport. Other phases of Caution of civilisation were a l so noticDa^p n Nowhere else will you fi nd so "f^ a series of illustrations of m 3' e fashions, of coats which tl™"wore twenty and forty years ago, an d collars and ties according to period. Whoever was seeing his first Derby Day may well have thought as he looked at the mass of humanity on the Dowui, and on the grandstands that this was

greatest crowd that had ever been gathered together in one place, but there wero green patches which were absent last year, so that the pronouncement of the Epsom sage that it was not a record one is probably true. Still, to the New Zealanders who were present —and there wero not a few, as I have learned from private sources, and ono Now Zealander and his wife were seen in the. paddock—this Derby Day was' typical of what it has been for many years past. UNEXPECTED MIST. There is a certain dignity and leisure leading up to the classic race. One has plenty of time to look at the competing animals in the paddock and see their faces washed down. Then the string of twenty parades at a walk past the stands, and one has a chance to become familiar with the colours, and thus to watch one's fancy when the race actually starts. The canter back to the paddock further reveals something of the horses' possibilities. Five minutes afterwards they are on the far side of the horse-shoe course lined up for the start. and if the visibility is good the order of their going may be seen up to the first bend. All day the visibility had been good, but ten minutes before the race started thunder clouds darkened the sky and a light mist came over the course. No ono had ever thought of a fog, even the experts. And so when the rare began and everyone said "They're off!" those who had glasses explained who was leading and who had dropped back, but the general mass of those in the grandstands who could see to the other side of the course just knew that a race was in progress. At the top of the hiil all the horses passed out of sight, and for a minute there was dead silence over the crowd. The mist was not enougli to interfere with the view when they came into tha straight. It was easy then to pick up the colours. Papyrus was in front, followed closely by Pharos, Doris, Saltash, and Ellangowan. At this stage Papyrus and Pharos !were well clear of any possiblo intervenes and i their duel from that point onward was I one of the most desperate and proJouged that a Derby has produced for many years. Donoghue, on PRpyrus, had got the inside position before reaching the straight. With still a quarter of a mile from homo it looked as if Lord Derby's colt Pharos might stand a chance. PAPYRUS AND PHAROS. They were thrilling moments, the only real thrill the race yielded, but the issue was settled almost at once. Pharos began to weaken, or perhaps :t was that Papyrus, called upon for an extra effort, was able to pull out jest that finishing cfiort which belongs to the better horse and the well-trained horse. It was a fair and square duel, and the honours went to the better horse. To the accompaniment of the usual burst of cheering for tho jockey as well as for the gallant winner, Papyrus forged ahead to win comfortably by a length from another gallant, horse in Pharos. Parth, whose chance at the last had been rated lightly by those who knew him best, ran on into third place, and this after being the last to leave j the gate. He finished with rare resolution and more strongly than either Papyrus or Pharos. DONOGHUE'S STORY. The popular Donoghue thus describes the race and his mount. "I have always I liked the horse from the time last autumn I beat Town Guard on him. He gav,.e * me' the right sort of feel when I cantered to the post, and I felt more than ever ifc would, take a pretty good one to beat: him. I had the luck to get well.away on him,, and lis soon as I was in the place I wanted to be in, not being in front but 'right there,' I knew he was handy, and ho showed by taking me into my place thaC his speed was keen-edged. Ivnockando led me, Town Guard was on my left, and Ellangowan I saw on my right. As we went on I felt I could go to the front on him at any time. He gave me that wonderful feel: Coming round Tattenham Corner he moved as if he owned it, and I simply had to let him go to the front when once in the lino for home. Lord Derby's horse came to me and challenged,! but I could feel the grit and determination in my horse. It came out when I shook the whip at him to ask him to go on and win his race. Ifc was puro stamina and gameness that won him the race."

For Donoghue it was a wonderful achievement. Luck may not always be with him, but it has stuck leechlike to him in modern history of the Derby. Humorist and Captain Cuttle were eleventh-hour mounts for him, and though engaged long ago for Papyrus he would have had to relinquish" the ride had Lord Woolavington noli released him from riding Knockando. So the jockey's sun is as high in the heavens as ever, and he was made to realise his personal popularity in tho splendid reception accorded him.

Mr. Irish proudly led in the winner and was congratulated on every side, for, though a win for Lord Derby would have caused general rejoicing, it was nevertheless a popular win in every sense. Mr. Irish wins a stake which runs into five figures, doubtless a few odds and ends'in bets, and finds himself the owner of a champion worth a matter of £40,000 af least. For Lord Derby, iwho came so near to realising his life's ambition on, the Turf, there was some genuine sympathy, but this great, good sportsman accepted the result with his customary smi;o and admirable philosophy. This is the third time in thirteen years that he lias run second' for the Derby—with Steadfast in 1911, Archaic in 1920, and this year with Pharos. ' OWNER'S GOOD FORTUNE. The story of Papyrus is quito romantic. Mr. Irish is a close friend of Basil Jarvis, his trainer; and it, was through the latter that the latest Derby winner becamo possessed of Periosteum for a few hundred guineas, and with this horso he won the Ascot Gold Cup and several other valuable races. Part of the money won by Periosteum was invested in a yearling at the Doncaster sales in 1921. That horse won the Derby this year. Mr. Irish has no other horse in training with the exception of Bar Gold, a mediocrity purchased to lead Papyrus in his work.

The fact that Donoghue was to ride Papyrus instead of Town Guard was widely regarded as- an obvious tip. Donoghue is the best known and most successful jockey of his time, his luck and skill rivalling that of the famous Fred Archer. Born at Warrington in October, 1834, the eldest of a family of five, ho became interested in horses from his early years, and in his teens was already an expert rider. Strange to relate, not a single relative of Steve's, so far as he himself knew, had anything to do with racing; while his father, until the future champion jockey had attained the age of 14, had never even seen a racehorse. Donoghiie's feat of riding three successive Derby winners is unique, although other jockeys have won three and even four times, but not consecutively.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19230726.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE DERBY "HAT TRICK", Evening Post, Volume CVI, Issue 22, 26 July 1923

Word Count
2,237

THE DERBY "HAT TRICK" Evening Post, Volume CVI, Issue 22, 26 July 1923

Working