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WOMEN IN PRINT.

All accounts of weddings or other functions intended for this column must be legibly written in ink. Marriages and engagements must be certified by the people concerned or by responsible relatives.

There -were signs this morning of the re-assembling-of the schools after the long holidays.. Groups of hurrying children sped up and down the streets, for the effort to be tin time after such a spell was" evidently a considerable one. Probably there are many mothers who live in restricted surroundings who breathed deep sighs of relief to-day, for the providing of safe and healthy amusement for a horde of healthy, restless creatures takes it out of the universal provider, cook, and housekeeper, judge, and board of appeal, entitled "mother," more than any iotber person could possibly appreciate. Wellington is notoriously ill-pro-vided with "breathing spaces" for such children, and the sight of the children ( playing about on dusty roads, in the streets, and similar unsuitable places, must needs make those who really care for their welfare feel most regretful. A Southern schoolmaster touched on another truth recently, when' making a speech op his retirement from the teaching ranks. He' spoke with regret of the foolish, ill-judging people who placed before trie children the point of view that school was a place to be dreaded. "Wait till you get to school; then you'll get it taken out of you" was the sort of speech quite commonly made by some parents to children, and then they were surprised that the little ones were unwilling to go to school. There is no donbt that the psychology of the thing is utterly wrong, for the thought presented to 'a. young and impressionable mind is one of vague dread, instead of happy confidence. In these enlightened days, when the old system of bullying by the older and stronger which was so mischievous to both parties concerned, is discouraged arid disapproved, children have much less to fear, while the education system is developing on the Knes of sensible encouragement to learn, instead of driving everything home by punishments. There is plenty of room for improvement in schools, especially in the matter of accommodation, but the children of to-day have a much better and happier time than those of thirty years ago or in earlier times. Mrs. C. E. Dudley and the MisSes Dudley are leaving by the Mannka for Sydney, en route for South Africa. Mrs. Thompson and Miss Robertson, of Melbourne, arrive by the Moeraki to visit Mrs. Jackson, Newton Abbot,-Ha-taitai'. Mrs. A. Fraser, .Wellington, is visiting he* sister, Mrs. H. Moschini, at Auckland. _ . Mr., and Mrs. G. A. Tapper and their son and daughter are among those leaving shortly for England. Mr. • and Mrs. 'Alfred Atkinaon are visiting Christchurch. A jumble sale will be held at St. Peter's Schoolroom to-morrow afternoon, commencing at 2.30 o'clock. It is stated that there will be many bargains offered. A correspondent. writes asking for a recipe for lettuce cream. Miss BickneU, A.R.R.C., ' DeputyDirector of the Nursing Division of the Health Department, has been granted leave for eight months to visit England, where, she y.tII inquire into many nursing matters, especially the arrange.ments of. the General Nursing Council for England and Wales in regard to the training and examination under the Nurses' Registration Act, also the negotiations now proceeding between the Central Midwivee' Board, London, and the Registrar of Midwives regarding reciprocity. She,' leaves on 6ti'i March in the Athenic. A correspondent writes as follows:— "I should be grateful if some mother with a son or husband engineer will tell me a goooV way to wash oily dungarees. I find it very laborious) and should like to know of some easier method." has been received of the sudden death of Mrs. J. R. Bloomfield, of Auckland, 1 ' a mucl^respected lady, who has many friends m Wellington. Mrs. Bloomfield was staying at the Lake House, Rotorua,."and was taken ill at half-past 7 in the evening, and died at 10 o'clock. Mrs. Bloomfield took a large part in the war activities in Auckland, and was one of those always ready to help in social "service directions. She will be much missed by a large circle of friends. Pastor Jos.' J. Franklyn, after a three years' tour of the world, arrived in WeHington yesterday by the Moeraki. Mr. Franklyn, who was accompanied by Mrs. Franklyn, was formerly minister of the Vivian street Church of Christ, and also held other New Zealand charges. He is on his way to Dunedin to begin his ministry at the Tabernacle Church : of Christ in that city.. I The matron of the Hospital' dwires to acknowledge the following gifts:— Flowers, Mrs. Waugh (Lambton quay), St. Thomas' Sunday School; old linen, anonymous; illustrated papers, Mrs. T. Dawson, Miss Higgß; chocolates, cigarettes, tobacco, and fruit, for ex-Tre*-tham patients, Red Cross Society, per Lady Luke; comic papers, for Children's Ward, Misses Anthea Casey, Rita Gigg, Isabel Clarke; for the pysio-th'eapeutic ward, 2 cases of fruit (Mr. Van Staveren), 1 case apples (Mrs. Williams). On Tuesday tie members of the F/«a----thersion Croquet Club were the guests of the Kelburn -Croquet Club, and on their arrival at midday were entertained at luncheon. A series of doubles was then arranged, and play commenced. iThe weather was favourable, and'a veryj enjoyable afternoon was spent, some of the games being keenly contested. 'The Featherston players were: Mrs. Vincent and Miss Card, Mesdames Vincent and Barry, Adamson and Wakely, Grealhead and Coombs, Simpson and Ayres, J3halrrers and Cadwallader; and thosfe representing the home club were: j Mesdames Gardner and Henderson, M'Dowel) and Rigg, llorrah and Fuller,; Mrs. Jolly and Miss Williams, Mosdantes Christie and M'Kenzie, Watkin and Wallis, Patterson and Shannon. This was the second meeting of the kind this season, members of. the Hutt Club having paid a visit on the previous week, and much pleasure has aiisen from the friendly intercourse, not less than from the cheerful rivalry of the ganiee. A highly recommended recipe (for rhubarb and fig jam is - sent by A correspondent in response to requests, which is as follows: —Wash and cut email lib cooking figs, put in preserving ; pan with about 2 teacupsful of -water, ; and boil about five minutes. Then add 6 or 8' pounds of rhubarb with its "(weight in sugar; and boil till it sets. If the rhubarb is young and fresh it is:a prettier colour, and jellies better \yhen thoroughly washed and dried, instead of being peeled. I cannot state exact time for boiling, as it varies with the land of fruit and the fuel used (gas, oil, or coal). If all ingredients are prepared and mixed the day previoun to cooking, it is unnecessary to cook the figj separately. 'j

Classes at the Wellington Girls' College re-assemble next Tuesday. Parents of new pupils will be interviewed on Friday, when the usual arrangement will be earned out, the names beginning from A to M being received in the morning, and the N to Z ones in the afternoon. They will be received on Saturday morning as well. New girls are asked to attend at the college on Monday morning at 9 o'clock.

A pleasant evening party was given recently by Mrs. Yates, of Petone, when the members of the St. John Ambulance class met to bid farewell to Miss Wells, who is leaving for Melbourne. Mrs. Yates expressed the regret which all felt at their friend's departure, and mentioned that the branch at Petone had lost no less than three promising members within sis weeks. The certificates for home nursing were presented, and as several present expressed the wish to continue the course, Mrs. Yates undertook to endeavour to arrange for further cfesses, explaining that owing to necessary expenses a certain number of pupils must be guaranteed. It was also stated taat t&e nnrsing division would start meetings and practice work in March. Thanks were given by Mrs. Yates for a presentation received previously, and Miss Wells bade farewell to her many fr'.endn. The engagement is announced of Lieut. D. J. H. Bush, R.N., D.S.C., of H.M.S. Chatham, son of the late Rev. T. Crommell Bush, of Cample Haye, Tavistock, Devon, to Una, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Rattray, Dunedin, says the Christchnrch "Press." A statue has been unveiled at Waimate, Canterbury, to the memory of the late Dr. Margaret Cruickshank. The late Dr. Cruickshank had been in practice for a number of years in Waimate. She lost her life during the influenza epidemic of 1918. The wedding took place at the Napier Congregational Church on 24th January dt Miss EtheL Gladys Prater, fourth daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. Prater, of, Napier, and Mr. William Pauling, of Nelson. The Rev. T. B. Richards officiated. The bride, who was given .away by her father, wore a frock of cream charmeuse trimmed with oriental lace, and a WTeath and veil. Miss Lorna . Prater and Miss Gladys Cate were the bridesmaids, wearing frocks of pale blue and lavender net with black hats to tone. Both carried sheafs of gladiolas. Mr. Thomas Pauling was best man, and Mr. Horace Prater groomsman. After the ceremony the guests were entertained at Scinde Hall; also to a dance in the evening. 'Later in the day, Mr. and Mrs. W. Pauling left by car for the north, the bride travelling in a smart navy blue costume and saxe blue hat. Their future home will be in Nelson. v

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19230201.2.99

Bibliographic details

WOMEN IN PRINT., Evening Post, Volume CV, Issue 27, 1 February 1923

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1,571

WOMEN IN PRINT. Evening Post, Volume CV, Issue 27, 1 February 1923

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