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WOMEN IN PRINT.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

j ,AII notices and descriptions of weddings sent .to The Post for insertion in this column must be authenticated and properly signed by responsible people, or they will not bo published. Engagei ment notices must be signed by the ! parties concerned. Miss Marjorie Hawka (Kilbiroie) has returned from -a visit to A.ui\kland. j Mrs. Dick (Dunedin) is the guest of ' Dr. and Mrs. H. J. Rawson, 36, Bayroad, Kilbimie. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Hacifield (Paraparaumu) are paying a brief visit to town. Mrs. Shailer Weston has returned from New Plymouth. Mrs. Melville (Auckland) has arrived in Wellington, to attend the League of Nations Conference. Mrs. Geisen (Wellington) is paying a visit to Auckland. Sir John and Lady Luke are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Pearce Luke in Auckland. Mrs. F. W. Rowley and her little daughter are- leaving for a visit to Nelson. ! Miss Lucy Brandon was the runner-up ! for the golf championship at New Plymouth. She is now the guest of Mrs. Russell Green at Wanganui. | Private cable advices from London' state that the marriage of Miss Monica Fulton to Bfr. Guy Stratton, of Alton I Priors, Peweey, Wilts, will take place on the 7th June. The bride-elect's brother, Mr.. Frank Fulton, has arrived in England in. time for the ceremony. : Speaking at the annual meeting of the Wellington Free Kindergarten Association last evening, Mr. J. Ca.ughley, Director o£ Education, drew attention to ; the many benefits the little ones gained by the kindergarten system of teaching. Between the ages of two and eight years, the speaker pointed out) the child's mind was very impressionable, and as the child was then so it would jbe during life. During that impresaionI able period at a kindergarten school the young children were taken out of themselves, away from their homes, many of which were surrounded by factories and large buildings, and were placed in much happier surroundings. The kindergajfcen movement was wide-spreading, and its results were everlasting, for what a child I learnt when it was young it would reI member all through life. Some day he hoped to see a kindergarten branch at • every school.

A pretty, evening wedding waa recently celebrated by the Rev. W. Fancourt at St. Thomas's Church, Newtown, the principals being Miss Frances K. Wicks, eldest daughter of Mrs. F. Wicks, and gland-daughter of the late Ma-, and Mrs. C. A. de La Roche, of Wellington South, and Mr Henry E. Passfield, eldest son of Mr. E. Passfield, of Kati Kati. Mr. W. Collie presided at the- organ. The bride, who was given away by her uncle, Sir. F. Plimmer, wore a, dress of white crepe de chine, beautifully embroidered; she also wove a veil and orange blossoms, and carried a shower boquet of pale pink carnations, cactus ■dahlias, and maidenhair fern. There were two bridesmaids, Miss Ethel Wicks, who was dressed in lemon charmeuoe, with pale blue and silver trimmings, and Miss Alice Passfield, also in lemon with pale blue and. ■ silver trimmings. Mr. Albert E. Siiteliffe was the best man. A reception was held later, after which Mr. and-Mrs. Pasgfield left for the North, the bride travelling in a navy tailored costume and grey panne velvet hat. Their future' home will be in Kati Kati. The engagement is announced' of Miss Isabel Mary M'Kenzie, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. D. C. M'Kenzie, Karori (late of Wanganui), to Mr. James Renzie M'Neely, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James M'Neely, Highland Park, Wellington. A reception will be given at the Pioneer Club to/Miss Rosina Buckman, on Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Members axe invited to be present, and it is hoped that the alteration which will extend the i size and usefulness of the reception room will be completed for the occasion. A particularly successful sale day waj held on Friday at Harcourt's Buildings in aid of the Memorial Chapel Fund. Mrs. Arthur Duncan waa in charge, and there was an excellent selection of pro- | duce, cakes, and home-made goods, with I plenty of willing buyers, so- that the result was. most gratifying to the promoters. | Many Aucklanders, says the Herald, evidently welcomed the commercial travellers' clothes drive'last Saturday as a timely opportunity of getting rid of apparel for which they no longer had any j use, but too good to consign to the cop- ' per fire, for shiny "belltoppers" and ares? coats could not, by any stretch of imagination, be considered suitable wear for the needy and the unemployed. But a use has been found for everything sent in, and the president of the association, Mr. A. Thompson, mentioned yesterday . that he had received a good offer for all this high-class apparel. Minus the headgeai, it filled a good-sized packing- case, : and included some broadcloth that must have graced majiy an august assembly. The death of Mrs. Duncan M'Millan took place recently at her residence, Constable-street, Wellington, after a long illness. Mrs. M'Millan was the daughter of the lato Rev. James M'Pherson of Killhan Parish, Kintyre, Argyleshire. Mrs. M'Millan had a large circle of friends and acquaintances -who will regret her loss and sincerely sympathise with her husband and daughters iv their bereavement. Thf funeral was largely attended. The pall bearers wer« Highland friends. The Rev W. Shirer conducted the- funeral service and spoke of Mrs. M'Millan's many fine and love.able qualities. > An interesting mention in tho report of the Auckland St. John Ambulance Brigade is the following:—"Tho most important event has- been' the completion of the motor ambulance wagon, which has proved, extremely satisfactory to the members of the medical profession and their patients, although .in some cases the small Austin motor-car was still nsed with satisfactory results, particularly where long distances over bad 'roads had to be traversed. More than 150 patients had been transported, in addition to attendance at raoa meetings, etc., the distance travelled having exceeded 1400 miles. The district nurses had done j excellent work among the sick, having paid BH3 visits to 621 patients and asI sisted at 94 operations performed by I doctors in the homes o? patients

Word has been received in Wellington of the death on Sunday last of Sister Mary Borgia, at the Lewisham Hospital, Christchurch. The late Sister Borgia, who was in charge of the Convent of the Sisters ;of Mercy at Blenheim, was widely known in Wellington, and the many friends she made here will learn with deep regret of her death. Born at Mallow (Ireland) sixty-foui years ago, she came to New Zealand in 1878, and entered the Order of "the Sisters of Mercy, being professed in 1880. About fifteen years ago.she was in charge of St. Joseph's Orphanage, now at Upper Hutt, and was later assistant Eev. Mother at the Hill-street Convent. For the Jasfc seven years she. was in charge of Mip'&ifjtei'd vf U* Convent v! Mercy at Blenheim. . ■

Miss N. Riley, principal of the Wellington free kindergarten, writes as follows in the Kindergarten Association's report:—"lt is only as. we watch such an experiment as the opening of a new kindergarten that it is borne in upon' us very forcibly what a tremendousi power for good it is. The gradual awakening to the' realisations of the many things that make life brighter and happier. The "application of energy to fulfil some definite purpose. The control of noise because of thought for others. The formation of habits of neatness and cleanliness arising from a sense of selfrespect and obligation to our fellows. The practical expression of the fact that love expands and cultivates all that is best, and that ' there is no time for anger,' surely these are lessons in the true sense of the word that are well worth learning, and the younger we learn them the better." A very satisfactory report was given at the annual meeting- of St. John Ambulance Association in Auckland. Progress had been made in all directions, and a special mention was made 01 the winning of the Hessey Shield by an Auckland division by 98 points out of a possible 100. The donations were mentioned with pleasure, one of £53 '6s Sd from the Auckland Rugby League, and £26 5s from the Rugby Union. The attendance of nurses at the. matches had been greatly appreciated. The woddiing of Mrs. Louis Smith and Mr. T. Hislop took place on Saturday lust at St. John's. Church, the B«v. Dr. Gibb performing the ceremony. Mr. George Hislop was the best man, and the bride wae given away by her brother, Mr. William Stevenson. After the wedding a reception was held at Saves Court, at which only relatives and intimate friends were present. The engagement is announced of Miss Gladys May Thomas, of Martinborough, to Mr. James Harry Johnston, of Dunedin. Mrs. W. H. Skinner, of New Plymouth, writes interestingly of a visit to Brockenhurst, saya the Taranaki Herald. SHe speaks of the wondetful beauty of the New Forest and of the associations with William Rufus, and remarks:—"lt was no effort to imagine that the spirits, of the boys were there rubbing shoulders with those of the days of Rufus." In reference to the sunny slopes of the beautiful cemetery, Mrs. Skinner says:—"lt is pathetic to see them so far from home, but they are iv the loveliest surroundings and on the flanks of other graves centuries old. Loving and appreciative jands keep their graves tidied and bright with flowers. They are all neatly torfed; little glass receptacles are sunk in the grass, and these had quite fresh flowers in them, and all viere planted with bulbs, now flowering. Now, I wish the parents and friends could see them and how they are cared for. On Anzac Day the, school children take down the New Zealand flag, which hangs in the chancel o{ the old church, and carry it round the graves and add special flowers. There are four long rows of graves, and at the head of each is a white cro^s within a circle, on which is engraved the fern leaf; the name inscribed below. I was surprised at the large, proportion of Maori names. 11 found the name of Darcy Newell, so well known to all of us, and also the name of Hambling. If he is from New Plymouth the name is differently- spelt. On the ffrave of Darcy Newell was a wreath of flowers under glass with the. names of his parents inscribed on it. We had bought flowers in Lyndhurst— lovely pheasants' eye narcissus and double white tulips—and these I put on the graves mentioned and on tHe Maori craves. As we left ,the church three ladies came in who were unknown to me. I believe tbev must bave beer. New Zealanders because they went straight to our graves." There is qujte a craze among girls at present for dressing to their eyes. It is a pretty conceit, for ,it is generally admitted that a woman's eyes, if they be beautiful, are the most attractive thing about her. And a dress in the same shade serves to enhance their colour and brilliance as no amount of eye lotion could. Hence, if you have blue eyes, you should very carefully arrange for a touch of blue either at the throat or waist; a blue frock, of course, is better, but you may not vvish to live always in one colour. Brown eyes demand brown or cream, with, perhaps, a little old gold; grey eyes should have their colour emphasised by means of a grey frockpurple and mauve are very kind to them too. In short, whatever the colour of your eyes, let your dress, tone with them; thus you will be identified with one particular colour that cannot fail to do you justice. And, as Nature never makes a mistake, you will find that you arts dressing to your hair as well. Little things like this make all the difference to i every woman's appearance, whether her bank balance be large or smallNews comes that America is considering a change in the marriage service as set forth in the Protestant Episcopal Church (the American "Church of England") so that neither bride nor bridegroom will be obliged to sacrifice'/truthfulnass at one of the most important and solemn moments of their lives. It is contemplated making both parties promise to love, honour, and comfort each other, and to forsake all others so long as they both shall live. The word "obey" is to be omitted, and the bridegroom is not to be required to make the empty assertion that he will endow his wife with "all,"his worldly goods." If tins intention should S be carried, out, as seems likely,, young people who have a strict sense of truth and honour will be relieved of a difficulty. which has existed for centuries, and will be able to make- their vows without any" "arriere pensee.".

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19220530.2.103

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WOMEN IN PRINT., Evening Post, Volume CIII, Issue 125, 30 May 1922

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2,144

WOMEN IN PRINT. Evening Post, Volume CIII, Issue 125, 30 May 1922

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