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LOCAL AND GENERAL

Though not an ideal day, yesterday was sufficiently fine to allow the usual number of holiday-makers to seek recreation out of doors. Traflio on the railways was heavy, both on the-Hutt line (to Trentham races) and on the Manawatu line. Thousands of people attended the Labour Day Carnival at Newtown Park, and there were very great crowds at Day's Bay and Rona Bay. All day the trams, especially those running to seaside resorts, carried full loads of passengers. In the evening people flocked to the theatres' and picture shows in the city. .

The Minister of Railways (Hon. W. H. Herries) has informed Mr. G. Witty, M.P., that an enquiry will be held into recent cases of gas-poisoning at the Addington Workshops.

The Hon. W. Fraser left for Christchurch and the West Coast last night.

The danger of venturing to sea on a small yacht in rough weather was emphasised at Worser Bay yesterday, when at about 3.30 p.m. two men got into difficulties, the boat capsizing. Luckily they were seen from the shoro soon after the mishap by Mr. C. T. Bell (captain of the Worser Bay Life-Saving Club), who, with three other members, Messrs. F. Simmonds, J. Stanley, and E. Hough, launched a row-boat and effected a rescue. This is the first time that the present club has had a chance of proving its worth, and as the sea was very rough at the time the action is worthy of high praise. ■

The names of three soldiers who are next-of-kin to Mr. T. Ross, of Palmerston North, appeared in the list issued by the Defence Department last Saturday. All are reported missing. These are two sons (Privates Munro and Gordon Ross) and Corporal C. H. Davieg, the latter being believed to be killed. Private Munro Ross was a. member of the 7th Reinforcements, and experienced the hardships of the 1915 winter at Trentham and Waikanae. Private Gordon Ross was a member of the 13th Reinforcements, and had just lately arrived in France after finishing his training on Salisbury Plain. Corporal C. H. Davies belonged to tho 2nd Battalion of the Riflo Brigade, and was formerly' a well-known farmer of Te Rehunga, Dannevirke.

In a letter from a sister in England, Mr. J. W. Russell, of Opunake, learns (says the Hawera Star) that in the recent great offensive he has lost three brothers, three nephews, and three cousins. Besides this, another brother was wounded in the Jutland battle, and ia still in hospital.

Persistent endeavours have been made by Australian anti-conscriptionists to scare the farming vote, in spite of the assurance of the Federal Ministry that ample provision will be made for rural labour (states a message to the Sydney Morning Herald). In reply to such scares in New South Wales, the Prime Minister (Mr. Hughes) sent the following telegram to ,Mr. G. S. Briner, M.L.A. :—"I have stated in definite terms on several occasions during the last few days that the Commonwealth Government will extend every consideration to the requirements of the great natural industries of Australia, and that a sufficient amount of labour will be released to harvest the crops and carry on rural industries such as dairying."

High appreciation and admiration of the great bravery and splendid sacrifices of the New> Zealand men at the front were expressed in a motion adopted at the annual meeting of the New Zealand Association of His Majesty's Veterans 'to-day. The association further placed on record its sympathy with the relatives of men who had fallen.

Mr. Lightband, of Hastings, waited upon the Council of the Masterton Chamber of Commerce at its last meeting, and brought under the notice of members an industry for the utilisation of the by-products of the freezing works. He pointed out that the paunches of sheep and cattle could be treated and made into commercial goods, such as pocket wallets, handbags, etc., and laid on the table samples of the leather as treated ready for manufacture. Mr. Lightband stated that if sufficient money was subscribed to erect works to the value of £6000 or £7000 an industry coald be established that would employ between 150 and 170 people. It was pointed out thai arrangements could possibly be completed with the Wellington Farmers' Meat Company for the pnrchase of by-products from the worts.

So many rumours have been current hi connection with industrial disputes at Broken Hill that the Premier of New South Wales asked the LnspeetorGeneral of Police ■to furnish a report stating what industrial disturbances have occurred during the present year, with the nature of such disturbances, particular attention to be paid to any recent trouble. The Inspector-General of Police has now furnished, the Premier with a report, which shows that during last month the only industrial trouble that occurred at Broken Hill was a strike of twenty-four hours, from midnight on 6th September to midnight on 7th September. The railway workers and general labourers employed on the Broken .Hill-Condobolin railway and the members of the Hotel, Club, and Restaurant Employees' Union ceased work for twenty-four hours. About 4000 persons were affected, but there waß no disorder, and the mines were not picketed. "It will be seen," said Mr. Holman, " that the rumours current are entirely without foundation. There have been no riots, no disturbances, and no military intervention. As far as I can ascertain from the police, who constitute the most reliable source of information, the citizens of Broken Hill are steadily pursuing their daily avocations without industrial or social trouble."

At the Broken Hill Police Court last week, William D. Barnett, secretary of publisher of the Barrier Daily Truth, the the A.M.A., and, as such, printer and association's newspaper, was charged with having, on 19th August, made statements likely to prejudice recruiting to His Majesty's service. The action was based on an article which appeared in Truth on the date named, and the prosecution was under the War Precautions Act, and was instituted by the Defence Department. Counsel agreed that the defendant had nothing to do with' the writing of the article, but held that he, as publisher, was the responsible party, and should not have allowed publication. The Magistrate (Mr. H. Giles Shaw) fined Barnett £50, or three months in gaol ; and also ordered him to find sureties of £200 to comply with the provisions of the War Precautions Regulations for twelve months. J. Brookfield, leader of the anti-conscriptionist party, charged with having made statements likely to cause disaffection, was convicted and fined £50 or three months' imprisonment. Ho was also bound over for twelve months. Notice of appeal was lodged in each case.

The damage done by fire last Friday to the large sawmill at Tangawahine, near Dargaville, owned By Messrs. Robert P. Gibbons, Ltd., is estimated at £5000. Almost the entire output of the mill for many years past has been absorbed by the Australian market. Mr. Frank Gibbons has been manager at Tangawahine for some years.

The practice indulged in by boys in various parts of the Dominion of smashing the insulators on the telegraph poles by throwing stones and other missiles at them is to be put down with a firm hand. Tho cost of replacing the broken insulators, is said to be some hundreds of pounds per annum. In Auckland last Saturday two boys who had wilfully smashed five insulators, valued at 15s were each fined £2 and coats, and also ordered-to pay for the damage done

What is a veteran?" This was a question led to some discussion at the meeting of the New Zealand Association of His Majesty's Veterans to-day. Should members of the South African contingents be eligible for membership? borne members favoured their inclusion but others thought that these men would eventually have their own organisations. Eventually it was resolved that the association should include all members of the forces wh6_ fought in the colonial and South African wars and possessed medals. ■

Last night, in the Alexandra Hall, a very successful Labour Day "social" and dance was held under the auspices of the Social Democratic Party. There was a large attendance, among those present being Mr. J. Mackenzie (vicepresident of the New Zealand Labour Party and chairman of the Wellington L.E.C.) and many members of the Labour Day Sports Committee. Musical items were rendered by Mr. and Mrs. Whitham, Miss M'Leod, Miss Dunn, and Mrs. Andrews,

It had been intended, in connection with yesterday's Labour Day celebration, that Mr. H. S. Alpe, of Christchurch, should walk from the Upper Hutt'to the General Post Office, a distance of twenuyone miles, and from thence to the sports at Newtown Park. Subsequently the Labour Day Committee agreed that Mr. Alpe should defer his performance until Bed Cross Day (3rd November). On that date a carnival will be held on the Basin Reserve, and it will be there that Mr. Alpe will finish his walk from the Upper Hutt.

Following upon the allegation that Maltese are being brought into Australia to take the jobs of the men who are going to the front, the Commonwealth Minister for External Affairs, Mr. Mahon, has caused to be prepared a list which shows that the rate of immigration of Maltese has been less since the war than it was prior to the war. This list shows that 122 Maltese came to, Australia in 1812, and 193 in 1913. From January to July of 1914, just prior to the war, there were 404 arrivals. From then until the end of 1916 the number was only 117, and up to the present time this year only 142 have arrived, including the batch of 98 whose arrival recently gave rise to the allegation which prompted the Minister to look into the whole position.

Last year the New South Wales Government took action with respect totwo schools in the State conducted by Germans exclusively for German children, when it was decided to insist upon the work of these schools being conducted entirely in. the English language and at all times open to inspection, by officers of the Education Department. One of the schools is at Duck Creek (Narraburra) and the other at Jindera, near Albury. These conditions, the Premier is informed, have been scrupulously, observed (states ' the Sydney Morning Herald). At the instance of tie Premier of Victoria, Mr. Holman is now in communication with the Premiers of the other States respecting the advisability of introducing uniform legislation to provide for the English language being the mednm of instruction in all schools. The Victorian Parliament recently passed an Act on these Bnes.

The Prince of Wales arranged that a party of Australian and other overseas troops should visit his South London estate in Kennington a short time agoThis is one of the model London estates. It includes a day nursery, where a hundred babies of the estate can be accommodated while their mothers are at work. The nursery includes babies' baths, milk-sterlising rooms, playrooms, and a laundry for the children's clothes. The old tenants' hostel contains flats, which are rented at 4s to 6s a week, being built round an old-world garden, with a fountain. The cottage flats cost 11b, and include four rooms; small houses on the estate cost 14s 8d a week, and the rental includes electric light and all rates and taxes. Bach house has a bath, and a table-fitting to cover the bath when not in use. The Anzac lads came away with the impression that the Prince of "Wales was a model landlord, and his tenants were people to be envied. The scheme for the model estate at Kennington owes much to the constant supervision of Queen Mary, who particularly interested herself, in the children's creche.

The death of Mr. Samuel Paul Andrews in Christchurch last week recalls the fact that deceased was the fii'st worker to become a member of the New Zealand. Parliament. Mr. Andrews was born in the Isle of Wight in 1836, and learned the trade of a plasterer. In 1854 lie went out to Australia and followed mining and agricultural pursuits for some years. In 1864 he arrived in Auckland, and carried out plastering contracts there and at Nelson, Dunedin, and Christchurch. He had lived in the last-named city for fifty years. All his life Mr. Andrews had been closely associated with the temperance movement, and on settling in Canterbury took an active part in establishing the Indepen dent, Order of Good Templars,of which he was at one time Grand Cbicr siemplar, and in the, Sons of Temperance, of which he was the patriarch. In the days of the Provincial. Council he sat as a member for the City of Christclmrch till the abolition of the provinces. He was for three years a member of the Christchurch City Council. In 1879 he stood for the House of Kepresentatives for the City of Christchurch, as a supporter of Sir George Grey, and was elected, but two years later, when he sought another term, he was unsuccessful. He was for years vice-president of the Christchurcli Sports Association, and was champion oarsman for five, years. lie was a promi--nent Methodist." One of his foils is a-sub-lieutenant in the British Navy.

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL, Evening Post, Volume XCII, Issue 99, 24 October 1916

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2,196

LOCAL AND GENERAL Evening Post, Volume XCII, Issue 99, 24 October 1916

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