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MIMES AND MUSIC

■ ■ ♦ (By "Orpheus.") THE SHOWS. GRAND OPERA HOUSE. Harry Rickards's "Follies," season closes tonight Allen Doone, 26th July to 10th August. Graham Moffat, "A Scrape o' the Pen," 21st August HIS MAJESTY'S. Brennan-Fuller Vaudeville. . THE KING'S THEATRE. Picture* nightly. STAR THEATRE. Pictures nightly, NEW THEATRE. Continuous Pictures. ■ ' EMPRESS THEATRE Continuous Pictures. t SHORTT'S THEATRE. Continuous Pictures. PEOPLE'S PICTURE PALACE. Continuous Pictures. BRITANNIA THEATRE. Continuous Pictures. OPERA HOUSE. Continuous Pictures. Mr. and Mrs. Graham Moffat and their Scottish players will tour the Dominion until 22nd September, after which Queensland will be visited. The complete tour as at present mapped out finishes on Bth January, 1916, at Perth. The Corrick Family are at present making their farewell tour of New Zealand, which will conclude at the end of this month. It is the intention of the clever family to retire from the stage and settle down in Tasmania. The J. C. Williamson management has decided to revive that charming little American play, " Sunday," in which Miss Tittell Brune made her first success in Sydney. Miss Muriel Starr will play the part of Sunday. The revival takes place to-night in Sydney. A correspondent writes to the Bulletin : — Exit. Charle3 Cartwright, once popular in melodrama, but not much seen on i"he stage during recent years. He made a couple of Australian tours, the first in company with Olga Nether, sole. Both trips were lengthy and remunerative. His earliest apprenticeship was served with Mrs. Langtry, but he gained his best experience as a member of Henry Irving's company at the Lyceum. At the Adelphi, a London headquarters of popular melodrama, he specialised for many years in vicious interference with the- handsome hero and the virtuoua heroine. From "Potash and Perlmutter" at Melbourne Theatre Royal: "Twenty-two dollars has he charged for sleeping-cars, and he was recommended as a wideawake salesman ! No wonder he can't sell goods — he sleeps all the time." Another : "Cost you seven dollars for a dinner? What did you eat — goldfish?" "Inside the Lines," a new spy-drama, is to be staged at the Criterion Theatre, Sydney, early in August. A speciallyorganised company, headed by Mr. Lan Maclaren and Miss Charlotte Ives, will interpret the drama, which has already had a successful run in England and America. The author of the play is Earl der Biggars, • who wrote "Seven Keys to Baldpate." Mme. Grace Millar Ward, of Sydney, has received a gift from Mile. Adeline Genee in the agreeable form of a King Albert Book, accompanied by a letter, in which the famous Danish dancer sends news. It is to explain how it is that after bidding farewell "for ever" to the stage in London, she is now touring in America. No better reason could be given .than that all her appearances are in the cause of war charities. More especially tho diva is interested in the ones, presided over by Queen Mary. Her Majesty has long t been a friend and patron of _ Genee, and, besides sending her wedding "presents, was represented at the marriage ceremony. At His Majesty's Theatre, on Monday night, Waller's "Butterflies" will present, their novel entertainment. It is stated that no combination of the kind that has visited Wellington can claim such all-round musical equipment. For example, . the principal comedian (Mr Wylie Watson) plays the 'cello with remarkable skill, assisting in the instrumental finale that is one of the features of the entertainment; and the accompanist (Mr. F. W. Dennett) is a brilliant executant in solo work. On the purely musical side there is M. Gregory Ivanoff, a Russian violinist who was solo player in the Tsar's Imperial Orchestra. Mr. Wylie in addition to being chief comedian, is also an excellent dancer. Miss Cecilia Gold is the soubrette, and Miss Marion Armitage, the comedienne, has won first place with all audiences who have heard her in this country. " ' - 'Ou Monday, 26th inst., Mr. Allen Doone will - commence his Wellington season, ' when lie will stage his latest success, " Barry of. Ballymore." Mr. Doone will be seen in the name part, Tom Barry, and he will be supported by the favourite actress, Miss Edna Keeley, and a talented company. ' "Barry of Ballymore" is said to be clean, novel, and humorous, and fun ripples unbroken through each act. There are some gems of Irish eongs in the play, such as "Mother. Asthore," "Mary," "My Heart's 'Bouquet," and "Eyes of Irish Blue," which Mr. Doone" will sing. There are a lot of children dancers, and some wonderful mechanical scenic changes. Mr. Doone is an actor, a singer, and a composer, and he has won success in all capacities in America, Australia, and New Zealand. His plays all have' an- honest ring in them, and" none of them have -yet proved a failure. Haddon Chambers, the Australian dramatist, writes to his sister, Miss Agnes Chambers,- Sydney, under date 22nd May from The Cottage, Bisham, Marlow-on-Thames : "I lost one of my best friends and closest colleagues in the Lusitania _ — Charles Frohman, the great American manager. Just before sailing he wrote me in his usual vein of humour to say that he had booked by the Lusitania, and would I kindly see that bhe got in safely. ... I went, over to Queenstown with Lestocq, his London manager, toget Frohman's body. We crossed the Irish Channel at night with all lights .out on account of the German submarines. The country from Dublin to" Queenstown was. ablaze with gorse in blossom, .'and all the railway stations were full of coffins. -Tho demand was, of 'course, unprecedented. It was the saddest quest I was ev.er urxin. -One caught oneself continually in a 'fathomless sigh, and some Jines • of, Swinburne's dirged insistently in my thoughts :—: — Tea, and nith weariness of lips and eyes, ' With breaking of the bosom, and with sißhs, We labour, .and are clad and fed with grief. "After finding and formally identifying Frohman, who looked very resigned and serene, we bore him to Liverpool, and sent him to New York. I fancy he must have been spared the agonies of drowning, and that his heart couldn't survive the first shock". Just before the ship went down he said to a girl friend of mine, who was fortunately saved, that ' after all, death was only a beautiful adventure.' " " Busk " in the Bulletin : I think the most common, name on our Poverty Point has been Roberts. There was Dick ; and his son is H. R. Roberts, the comedian, who was with Garner's first company. Little Roberts as the "New Boy." Gilbert Roberts was a. Melbourne junior reporter, who climbed quickly to the management of tho Hay-

market Theatre, rechristened Duke of Edinburgh, under Montgomery's patronage. Another Roberts was leading man with Minnie Palmer. Yet another 'has performed here as a monologist, with a clever sketch of Dick Turpin, etc. All these on the male side. On the other there have been Maggie, Carrie, Decima, Laura (playing Sarah in " On Our Selection"), and a smart vaudevilliste from the united States. We have had of Fords a father and two daughters, and of Fordes, Martin and Jack and their sister. The Careys have been Lena, W. G., G. P., and Rege. The Younges, Richard and Fred, were distinct from the Youngs, Charley and Fanny. The Stewart family yielded seven to the boards, including Nancye. The Howsons formed a large theatrical and musical family. The Carandinis were mother and four daughters. Their father was Harlequin in the first Melbourne Theatre Royal panto., 1855. The Leopolds were four men and two women. Ned Holloway and Jim Holloway were not related to one another, nor were they kin to W. J. and C. Holloway, the brothers. Three Wallaces may be noted, and three Seftons. Of the Edouin family, six ; the Nelson family, six ; and three Wiseman sisters.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19150724.2.135

Bibliographic details

MIMES AND MUSIC, Evening Post, Volume XC, Issue 21, 24 July 1915

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1,295

MIMES AND MUSIC Evening Post, Volume XC, Issue 21, 24 July 1915

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