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IN SOUTH AFRICA

REBELLION AFTERMATH (FROSI OUrt OWN CORKESPONBENT.) PIETERMARITZBURG, 12th Jan. The Johannesburg and Durban Chambers of Commerce have been urging the Union Government to appoint a Commission to deal with the question of compensation for looting by rebels in the recent insurrection which ..the Germans were kind enough to instigate and engineer. The Government's announcement that Parliament would be asked to deal with, this somewhat comp-.Lated question was naturally a disappointment to the commercial community, to whom, it appears, many of the rank and file of the rebels are indebted. Mr. Malan, the Minister of Mines, in the course of a valedictory address to the Pretoria Civil Guard, took the opportunity to state that, pending the meeting of Parliament at the end of February, the Government intends to institute an enquiry, with a view to obtaining data on the matter for the information and guidance of the High Court of Parliament aforesaid. A prompt enquiry is very necessary, and therefore 'the present announcement is a welcome one. The Minister of Railways (Mr. Burton) will take charge of the investigation. REBEL SCHOOL TEACHERS. The Executive Committee of the Transvaal Provincial Council has very properly decided that teachers proved to have already participated in the late rebellion, or to have been sympathetically associated with it, will be dismissed from the service, and all emoluments or retiring allmvances due will be forfeited. There will be not a few vacancies for teachers, I fancy, in the Transvaal and Free State. THE DEFENCE FORCE MOBILISATION. The Defence Force mobilisation order, announced last week by the Minister of Defence, General Smuts, as being more acceptable to Dutchmen than the British system of volunteering, is now being carried out in the districts proclaimed. The commando in the Krugersdorp district — a typical Dutch centre — is reported to be now at full strength and ready for the campaign to be led by General Botha in German South- West Africa. Sik defaulting burghers, after an examination by a board of officers, have been removed to gaol. GENERAL SMUTS'S NEW YEAR WISHES. " Following the example of more august personages, the Minister of Defence, Major-General Smuts, has telegraphed to the South African troops on active service his warm wishes for a happy and successful New Year. The Minister expresses the hope that the year 1915 may, through the united efforts of all, become one of the most eventful and illustrious in the history of the Union of South Africa.. The Anglo-Boer general concludes significantly by expressing the hope that before the end of the year "we may see peace finally established over a larger, happier, and more united South Africa." The word "larger" is an apt indication of General Smuts's character — he is a man of vision. Only the other day General Botha paid a remarkable and true .tribute to the strong, silent man, unwavering and untiring, at headquarters. GERMAN SOUTH-WEST CAMPAIGN. According toll statement made in a Johannesburg paper on the authority of an officer on leave from Luderitzbucht, the commissioned ranks of the enemy's forces in German South-West Africa *re largely made up of officers who are victims to either drugs or alcohol, and the majority of them are believed to be opium-eaters. From a purely military standpoint, nearly all of them are reported to be first-rate fighters. The German south-west police, around whom the German forces are built, are noncommissioned officers of excellent character, fine riders, good shots, and, unlike the general German soldier, possessed of valuable initiative qualities. The police, for Germans, are well paid — £15 a. month and free house, and, if possible, fuel. GENERAL DE WET General Christian De Wet, the principal leader of the backveldt Boer rebellion, somewhat belies his initial name. He has a big siake in South Africa, and for this reason surprise has been expressed that he should have rebelled. It is said that he has also considerable interests in German South-West Africa. De Wet is an implacable Hertzogite in politics, and hates Botha and Smuts 3 the heads of the Union Government, probably quite as much as he ,hates the "pestilential English." REBELLION CASUALTIES. The official return of the number of casualties sustained by the Union Forces during the rebellion up to 22nd December shows that there were 78 killed, 27 died of wounds, and 229 wounded ; total, 334. It has been difficult to ascertain the (Sasualties. in killed and wounded amongst the rebel commandoes, but from what is known there is little doubt that the number of killed considerably exceeded 170, and the wounded 300. In the operations, in German South West Africa 16 have been killed, 3 died of wounds, 38 wounded, 44 wounded and taken prisoner by the enemy, and there are 268 unwounded prisoners in the hands of the enemy. Twenty-three men have died of disease, and 29 by misadventure. These numbers make a total of 703. There are over 5000 captured rebels in gaol, and 4000 out on parole. Which shows that the Government military authorities have been benign as well as busy. The Union Forces in the field number about 50,000— under a third of the number of Australians now under arm.s— and for the German campaign they are being divided into three columns. TRANSVAAL SPORTSMEN AT THE FRONT. Transvaal sportsmen are very creditably represented in the fighting line. Sir Abe Bailey, the president of the Transvaal Cricket Union, is on tho steff of Major-General Sir Duncan M'Kenzie, at Ludeiitzbucht, the German South West (harbour, and; the various cricket clubs have sent about 200 men. One of them, Lieutenant S. R. Haines, was killed last November in an action against the rebels. The Transvaal tennis clubs have sent 180 players. Of these, Rex Winslow, a well-known wielder of the racket, joined the Imperial Light Horse, and was killed in an engagement against a German force. Sixteen Transvaal Rugby clubs have set a fine example, as they are represented by 379 men. Three of them. Captain Nolte, Lieutenant Ross Frames, and Private W. Oxenham, head the roll of honour. Quite a third of the Rugby men are of Dutch ■ nationality. Transvaal Soccer players number 190. But there are many others, of course, whose names havo not been obtained. Similar figures are not ascertained as yet in regard to the other provinces of the .Union, but the numbers will be pro-

portionately about the same. There are twelve international cricketers — a team — headed by H. \V Taylor, who is in the 2nd Xatal Carbineers, and R. 0. Scnwarz. Reg. Walker, the Natal sprinter of Olympic fame, and holder of the 120 yds amateur record, is-iu the 7th Mounted Infantry in German S.W The iast sentence of a letter of his reads : "The country is damnable." Aubrey Faulkner, the cricketer, is a lieutenant in the Worcestershire Regiment in France. DEARER BREAD. The price of the 21b loaf has gone up on the Rand from 6d to 7d. There has been an indignant public protest, but the master bakers state that their hands have been forced by the flour market. TRANSVAAL GOLD OUTPUT The output of the Transvaal mines during last year was 8,378,13^02 of gold valued at £35,588,075. This is 416,6850z (value £1,769,965) less than the output of 1913. The high-water mark year was 1912, when % the output reached 9,124,2990z, value £38,757,560. THE DIAMOND INDUSTRY The war has hit the diamond industry very hard. The De Beers Consolidated Mines Co. held it« annual shareholders' meeting last week at Kimberley, when the directors announced that there would be no dividend this half year. The company has treated its 2900 white em-, ployee&. under the circumstances, very generously. Some are retained, othem have been liberally helped to obtain work elsewhere, and those who have gone to serve their country at the front receive from the company the difference between their military pay and their half-pay from the company. LABOUR CONFERENCE. There has been a good deal of adverse criticism of the Labour Party m holding a conference at East London at this critical time, when all party controversy should, in the interests of the State, be left over until a more convenient season, when industrial and political polemics will come into their own again. At the conference, Mr. W. H. Andrews, M.L.A., was re-elected president. Resolutions were passed favouring the establishment of village communes for unemployed, and the extension of the Workmen's Compensation Act to all State employees. The conference called upon the Government to release all men imprisoned in connection with the Johannesburg strikes, and to provide for all persons injured and the dependents of those killed by soldiers in July, 1913. A protest was entered against the encroachment on the freedom of speech and of the press xinder the cloak of martial law regulations, depriving convicted persons of the right of appeal; and, in view of the termination of the rebellion, demanded the withdrawal of martial law in the Union, with the possible exception, of districts on the German border. The conference declared the party's adherence to the principW of International Socialism, based upon the community of interest of the workers, as opposed to tho international combination of the capitalist class. The next conference will be held at Klniberley in December.

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IN SOUTH AFRICA, Evening Post, Volume LXXXIX, Issue 48, 26 February 1915

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IN SOUTH AFRICA Evening Post, Volume LXXXIX, Issue 48, 26 February 1915

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