Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LOCAL AND GENERAL

A sitting of the Public Service Appeal Board is being held in Wellington today. B Captain W. G. Watson, as a member ot the Harbour Board, wished to know at last night's meeting if the Defence Department was paying pilots engaged on examination duties in the harbour, lie was informed by the secretary of the board that the Department was being debited with £60 per month by way of payment for this service. Captain Watson also wished to know if the pilots were receiving extra pay for this work, as he understood was the case in Sydney and Melbourne. The Chairman suggested that the matter should be considered at the next meeting of the Wharves and Accounts Committee. Last year, as well as previously, the New Zealand Government chartered a liner to bring out some hundreds of immigrants to this country from Home, but it is considered unlikely that such a course will be taken this year. However, large batches of immigrants a,re being brought from the Old Country by each mail steamer, and, according to advices received, the liners Mamari (replacing the Arawa) and Somerset (replacing the Ruapehu) have on board some hundreds of third-class passengers. These include "assisted" immigrants as follow — By the Mamari: 22 domestic servants, I*2 farm labourers, and 99 separated relatives; by the Somerset: 13 domestic servants, 9 farm labourers, and 42 separated relatives. There is a notable decrease in the of farm labourers coming, this being accounted for by the 1 fact that many have enlisted in the Army. , A ,P' a y on the -words ."sight" and "site" was responsible for uproarious laughter at Mr. Fisher's meeting last evening". The speaker was speaking of the Mount Cook site* and referred to the improvements which it was intended to carry out in the way of establishing a museum there. Waving his hand behind him he remarked: "We have here a magnificent sight- — -" Immediately behind him was a gentleman known to many of his political opponents holding the lantern which indifferently illuminated proceedings. "Mr ■ ■," said a witty interjector, mentioning the name of the gentleman who was entrusted with the care of the lamp. The crowd was quick to grasp the joke, and everytime the speaker mentioned the word "site" therfe was always a spontaneous laugh. "It's worth holding a Meeting ' to have a . joke like this," was Mr. Fisher's comment. "Moderate," in a letter to The Post, complains that "Red Feds." have regained control of the Waterside Union. The Post has made enquiries, and the evidence, so far, does not appear to justify the application of the term : "Red" to the whole of the new execui tive. One witness, familiar with the waterfront, ,says , that though the new committee has a "Red Fed." element, i the word moderate truly describes the majority. Whatever the colour of the executive may be it will be revealed soon at the meeting convened for the election \ of officers. Comparisons are often futile as well as odious. One has just been made in the | Auckland Herald reflecting upon the Post Office hero in its handling of oversea, mails. The fact is stated that the Riverina, from Sydney, brought 340 bags to Auckland, which were handled and part despatched south in forty minutes. " This work," says our contemporary, is in striking contrast to that carried out in Wellington a few weeks ago, and which was the subject of comment by the Auckland Chamber of Commerce at the time." Then it is said that the Moaha, from San Francisco to Wellington, reached this port two and a quarter hours before the despatch of the noon express for Auckland, " and yet the local portion of the mail was not forwarded until the second express, which left Wellington at 9.10 p.m. for the north." The comparison is not a fair one, because the Moana brought from 1100 to 1200 bags of mails— probably the heaviest that has yet arrived at oro time ; the bags had to be sorted out, and mails despatched south, east, and west, as well as north, whereas Auckland has only to consider the despatch of south mails. Again, the Auckland office backs the railway station, whereas the Thorndon station is some distance from the G.P.0., and mails have to be at the express fully twenty minutes before it leaves for Auckland. Enquiries made show that the staff in Wellington is as speedy and expert in handling any mails as any large P.O. staff in the Dominion. " A.G.M." write* :~ '^erhaps the following figures will give your readers some idea of the enormous war mdem nity extorted from France by Germany in 1871. The indemnity was 5,000,000.000 francs. If this was paid wholly in gold pieces of 20 francs (the diameter of each 20-franc piece is |-in) they would measure, if placed side by aide, 32814 miles. Each 20-franc piece weighs 99£ grains. Assuming that a wagon carries five tons, it would take 324 of these wagons to transport the indemnity to Germany." ' Mr. W. J. Howell has been elected Chairman of the Hutt County Council. Messrs. Kirkcaldie and Stains, Ltd., have just opened a large shipment of figured Japanese crepe in dainty, Early Victorian designs. This fabric is greatly _in demand for holiday frocks, etc. Price. Is yaixl. — Advt. "Aertex" underwear, the ideal for hot weather. Trunk, drawers, and singlets, 3s 6d, 4s 6d, 4s lid. Good value.— G«o. Fowlde, Ltd.— Advt. *

At 9.11 this morning the Fire Brigade received a call to No. 46, Wnghtstreet, owned and occupied by Mr. Andrew Irvine. The house was being painted, and in the "burning-Off" process some of the outer boards had caught fire. The fire was extinguished without, much difficulty. The house was insured for £600 ih the North British Office, and the contents for £200 in the New Zealad Office. Throwing stones at a railway carnage near Kaiwarra was responsible for the appearance of three boys before Mr. D. G. A. Cooper, S.M., at a sitting of the Juvenile Court to-day. Two of the offenders were 13 years of age, and the other 9. The two eldest lads were ordered to receive six strokes of the birch, and the other was severely admonished and discharged. Another boy, 11 years of age, was also admonished by his Worship and discharged for the theft of a Post Office Savings Bank box. During the hearing of a civil case at the Supreme Court yesterday afternoon it transpired that the arc -lights connected with the tramway system were cut off at 12 o'clock midnight. " Why are they turned off then?" asked his Honour Mr. Justice Edwards of the witness who gave the information. "I don't know, your Honour," was the reply. His Honour : "It seems strange to anyone coming to Wellington to find the arclights cut off so early." Mr. J. O'Shea (City Council solicitor) : "There are the .street lights, your Honour." His Honour : " But there is not much light from the street lights." Police cases at the Magistrate's Court to-day were disposed of within a few minutes. An old offender, Albert White, was fined £2 for drankennep. in default 14 days in gaol. A prohibition order was also issued against him. \Vm. John O'Connor was "fined 10s for insobriety, with the usual alternative. Three first offenders, who were out on bail, received lenient treatment. A young man named David Hall, who admitted committing a grossly indecent act in Cuba' Street, was fined £2, with the alternative of fourteen days in custody. Tnspector Hendrey explained that Hall was suffering from the effects of drink. Mr. D. G. A. Cooper, S.M., was on the bench. Ernest "Wakefield Holmes, a day scholar at the Otago High School, put up a remarkable record at the recently-held school sports. This speedy youth is only 16 years of age, yet he (stands sft lOin high. During the afternoon he scored 21 points, and won the senior athletic cup. Two opponents scored 13 points each. Holmes won the 100 yards in 10 l-ssec, and also ran away with the 220, and 440 yards events. He was second in the half-mile and second in the high jump, but won the long jump with a leap of 19ft 3in. It is recorded that the lad is also a very clever student. Fleetness of foot runs in this family, as the father was a fine runner, and young Holmes's brother who \yent away with the Expeditionary Force has by his performances shown that he had the makings of a great all-round athlete. The shipbuilding trade at Auckland appears to be very brisk at the present time (states the Auckland Herald). At the yards of Mr. C. Bailey, jun., in Freeman's Bay, a new auxiliary schooner for the Pacific Cable Board is now nearing completion, and should be ready for launching in a few weeks' time. Tho vessel is one, of the first of her class yet constructed at the port, and is expected to show a fast turn of speed under sail and -auxiliary power. The keel of a now steamer for the passenger and cargo trade on the Northern Wairoa River had been laid at Mr. G. T. Niccol's yards. The vessel is for the Kaipara Steamship Company, which recently sold the old steamer Aotea to a local firm. The Aotea, which has been running in the river service for about sixteen years, will be retained in the trade until the new steamer is ready for service, which will be in about eight months' time. Most of the other Auckland shipbuilding firms are busy buildihg numerous small craft for harbour use. Messrs. Campbell and Burke are the successful tenderers for a new garage which is to be erected in Tory-street for the Public Trustee, as executor for the T. G. Macarthy estate. The Dominion Motor Vehicles, Ltd., has taken a long lease of the proposed building, which is to be fitted up to the firm's retirements. The frontage to Tory-street will be 60ft by a depth of 120 ft, and the back part of the building will adjoin the rear of the premises in Courtenay-plaee until lately known as the Eagles Private Hotel. This latter building has been purchased by the above company, and re-arranged to form a suite of offices on the ground floor, which will be connected with the new building. The building is to be of two stories, and the whole of the ground floor wiil be devoted to the garage and workshop, and will be fitted with the very latest .equipment for the proper handling of cars. The workshop is to be provided with overhead gear for raising and moving cars, as well as a pit for working underneath them ,and the latest machinery is to be installed. The garage will have two turn-tables and two wVslvdowns. A comfortably fitted up ladies' waitingroom and a fire-proof petrol store are also provided. The whole of the first floor is to be fitted up for the storage of cars and accessories. The building is to be of 'brick, with a concrete ground floor, the first floor wood, supported on steel girders and stanchions^ and the roof is to be carried on principles in one clear span. The removal of the old bottling store in connection with Macarthy's Brewery, to make room for the above building, as well as the increased output of the brewery, necessitates the erection of the larger and more substantial premises, for which Messrs. Campbell and Burkes tender has also been accepted. This new bottling store is to be of brick, with a frontage of 50ft to Tory-street, and will be equipped with the latest bottle-washing and filling apparatus. Both buildings have been designed by Mr. J. M. Dawson, architect, and will be erected under his supervision. The Mercantile Gazette reports registration of the company of A. R. Hislop, Ltd., as a private company. The office is in Wellington. Capital: £10,000, divided into 1)00 shares of £10 each. Subscribers : A. R. Hislop, 400 fully paid ; A. R. Hislop and A. R. Hislop (jun.), 200 ; A. R. Hislop (jun.), 400 fully paid. Objects : To acquire as a going concern the business of engineering merchants, ship chandlers, etc., carried on by A. R. Hislop, and A. R. Hislop (jun.) under the style of "A. R. Hislop." Summer's rain is seldom very severe, so in threatening weather take an umbrella and you'll be right. Geo. Fowlds, Ltd., carry a splendid range from 4s 6d to £2 2s.— Advt. A happy journey. No bother with baggage. Just check through us. We collect, check, and deliver. It facilitates checking if we take out your ticket. The N.Z. Express Co.. Ltd.— Advt. The following will be of special interest to the ladies of Wellington. Reports received from headquarters state that there is going to be a great scarcity of Kid Gloves during the next year or two, owing to the fact that the animals arc being killed off, and the enormous quantities of sluiib in process of cleaning, tanning, and dyeing have been neglected and spoiled. Already the prices abroad have advanced 60 per cont., and in some cases the prices have been doubled. Our readers will be glad to hear, though, that they will not bo affected to that extent if. thef buy their Gloves early at C. Smith's, Ltd., of Cuba-street, who wore fortunate in getting their full shipments before the war affected the trade. —Advt.

In connction with the Hutt Rose Show yesterday ft., competition for the best decorated table was held, Mrs. W. Fufcter securing the judge's verdict and Miss Bunny tho popular vote. The rose* naming competition was Won by S. E. Pearce. There were some unusual circumstances connected, with the death of a hoi'se at Tikot-angi, Waitara district, last week. The owner (Mr. Jury) had tethered the animal near a few hiveß of bees, and after it liad been there conic time it was worried by the bees. The result was that the horse made frantic efforts to get clear, and in doing 86 upset a number of hives. Then the attack be' gan in earnest, practically the whole colony settling on to the horse. Several neighbours endeavoured to do what they could to get, the victim of tbe bees away, but they, too, Were attacked. The final result of the occurrence was thab 'the animal was so much stung that it died, "Haven't you taken liquor there by the ton?" asked counsel of a witness in the box at the Supreme Court to> day. "Ask him something within the bounds of credibility," advised his Honour Mr. Justice Edwards, with a smile. "It was a Prohibition district," inter* jected the witness. "If you ask him if he took a ton of Hquor> and he says 'No, I didn't take a ton of litjnor,' he couldn't be indicted for perjury, although he might have taken a case of whisky," commented the Judge. "Ask him something within the bounds of commonsense." Counsel then proceeded to cross-examine the witness with a view to obtaining a better definition of the quantity of whisky involved. Tenders are now being called for the additions to the wool jetty in order to make it suitable for the Lytlelton Wellington ferry service. The berth lim already been dredged to aa ample depth, as already referred to in The Posi. )be plans for the work show that' the pre« sent wool wharf is 120 ft wide at the base, where the wool shed has been built, tt then juts out into the harbour to a. total length of 253 ft. The alterations will involve the widening of the outer part of the wharf from 34ft to 70ft, and <.>xtending the length by another 219 ft, which will give a total length of 4?2ft. The wharf &s altered will carry a largo waiting'shed for passengers (233 ft m length by 25ft in breadth), which will have an ornamental cantilever verandah projecting 6ft (on the western or ferry* boat side), roofed with Marseilles tiles. The whole western side of this shed will practically be permanently open. No walls ale provided on the western side at all. the roof being supported by iron pillars placed 20ft apart. The Lyttelton ferry steamers will nave all the way to Te Aro breastwork to back out in if necessary. Further, the boats will be berthed practically right oppose the new Wellington railway terminus.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19141126.2.67

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL, Evening Post, Volume LXXXVIII, Issue 128, 26 November 1914

Word Count
2,732

LOCAL AND GENERAL Evening Post, Volume LXXXVIII, Issue 128, 26 November 1914

Working