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THE TURF

FIXTURES. February 21 — Dunedin J.C. Autumn. ! February 21— South Auckland R.C. Autumn. February 26 and 28— Wanganui J.C. Autumn. March 4 and s— Dannevirk* R.C. j Autumn. March 11 and 12— Nelson J.C. Annual. Hitch 13 and 14— Napier Park R.C. Autumn. NOTES ANDjCOMMENTS (By Sir Bedivart.) Although The Parisian is now eight years old he is fancied in some quarters for the Australian Cup. His feet are apparently sounder than they used to be for he does not now have to wear bar shoes such as he wore prior to his success in the Melbourne Cup. W. Huxley, who accompanied F. Wootton on his visit to Australia, 1 is already on his way back to England. He should arrive just prior to the commencement of the season at Lincoln on 23rd March. "Cornach" writes from Tasmania :—: — ''In The Australasian of last week 'Terlfriga' has something interesting to tell of the oldest jockey in Australia, one Charles Mullaly. This frisky 'gossoon' is' 93, and, like Johnny Walker, of whisky fame, still going strong. Weil, of course, it's a fair age, but we are not going to let Botany Bay take the anke over Van Diemen's 'distant shore,' in the production of cast-iron, long-hy-ing natives. I quite recently met an octogenarian up Dunarlan way (my own native place), who used to be very fond of racing, and I asked him why he was not' at the Launceston Cupthis year. He replied, 'Well, you see, it's this way 5 lny father don't care for racing now, he is getting a bit on in years, and he don't like me to go tothem either, so I stay at home with him.' Now, what age must a man be who has a son over 80. They don't, as a rule, die about Dunarlan but, of course, . an odd one wears out." They race by electric light in Queensland, and trot by it in West Australia. Years ago there were meetings held twice or three times a week at Lillybridge, Sydney, which commenced at 8 p.m. The track was certainly not more than thre© furlongs round, and so many of the ponies which, raced on it used to fall whilst attempting to negotiate the turns that it was found necessary to pad the Tails and the jockeys' left legs like boxing gloves. It was a fairly warm spot was Lillybridge in those days, and the investment of a modest tenner would be sufficient to cause a three to one^ chance to jump to an odds-on proposition. So as to exclude people as far as possible from having a cheap view of the- proceedings a boarded fence? some 40ft high was erected. On the far side of the course, however, there was a hill, horn which vantage point the finishes could be seen, and the top of this was invariably well patronised. There it was possible to bet an even tram-ticket — six tram-tickets cost 5d — on the result of a race with a Chinaman. One night, when returning to Rand wick, I chanced to meet a prominent pony rider named Packy Quain. He had just come from Lillybridge, where, he informed me, he had piloted a winner. "Did you have a good win?" I asked innocently. "Well, nothing extra," he replied, "just give a graess^ — and don't make it too hot, for you know what the Bridge it, as to what I got for my winning mount." "A sovereign," I suggested. "What!"- said Packy. "A sovereign! Well this will give you sn idea of what a science they have brought things to at Lillybridge, for this is all I got out of it" — and he produced a packet of .Three Castles. Fact! Yes, things were about down to bedrock in those days, but there are still strang* happenings in connection with racing around Sydney. One of the funniest sights I believe is to watch the bottleofcs betting on results at Rand wick. They take up a position outside the fence on the hifls at the back of the course, and wager in kind. 1 Thus, three bottles to one, five bottles to four, etc. Poor Irving Saytes, who died suddenly in ChrisfccmKch the other day, ttsed to tell an amusing story about an experience he had near Melbourne. _Ho jumped into hansom and -was driven oat to one of the pony meetings. Now tt seems that certain of the cabbies used to kill two birds with one stone by getting a fare out to the coutso and on arrival there turning bookmakers. From their dickies they could see something of the racing, and they used to lay the odds to people outside the fence. On getting into his hansom to return home, Sayles heard his driver ask another : "How did you get on, Bill?" "Why," Teplied Bill, "they tore me to ribbons " "Go on, what did you do to them?" asked 'Arry. "Do," said Bill, "I done three blankety bob!" Returned visitors to Wingatui state that Kilrain -was quite unable to climb the hill there. The Lord Handicap, run at the Tasmanian Turf Crab's Meeting this month, fell to Tuticorin, a bay filly by Sarto from Chinook, bred by Sir George M'Lean. The Elwick Handicap was won by Tornea, by Stepniak from Gipsy Countess, bred by Mr. J. B. Reid. The English spring entries were of an encouraging nature, and in the Ascot Gold Cup France is very strongly represented. " Nimbus, who was considered very unlucky to lose the Derby, and Bruleur, 'who won the Grand Prix, are engaged. Sam Darling has definitely decided to give up training, and his stable will in future be. controlled by his son, S. F. Barling, who trained successfully for ■Messrs. Yon Weinberg in Germany. Darling prepared Galtee More and Atd Patrick for the Derby, Wild Fowler for the St. Leger, Slieve Gallion for the Two Thousand, and -Cap and Bells for the Oaks. He farms a large estate of his own. The Anglo-Australian sportsman Mr. Lionel Robinson is sending out from his 'Norfolk stud farm to the Randwick trainej* I. Eamshaw the three-.year-old St. Spasa, by St. Amant— Oarita, by Gallinule; and a two-year-old colt by John o' Gaunt, to be trained. St. Spasa, after showing promise on tne English Turf during his early two-year-old days, turned out a great disappointment, and M*. Jsobinson is of opinion that a change of dimate may effect an improvement. That is the reason he is sending him out to Australia. The following interesting particulars concerning Danny Maher are from the London Sportsman o! Bth tilt. : " Maher, although of Irish parentage, was born at Hartford, Connecticut, on 29th October, 1881, and is, in fact, an American, just over thirty-two years of age. He never served the apprenticeship which is the usual start of a jockey's career, and another exception to this rule is Tom Cannon, happily still alive and well to tell the tale of his many great exploits in tho saddle. Maher was first associated ■with his uncle, Michael Daly, and jumped straightaway into his bridle when, at the early age of fourteen, he («on on Phocebus, his second mount m

public, at Providence, Rhode Island. In 1898 h© rode 101 winners, in the yea* following 103, and in 1900 56, during which period his principal employers were Messrs. Arkwell and Trowbridge, Mr. David Gideon, Mr. W. H. Clarke, the late Mr. Pierre Lorillard, who brought him to England, and Sir Daniel Cooper, two pattern sportsmen, for whom George Blackwell was then training. His star was in the ascendant when he stepped aboard the St. Louis and started for England, for he has never looked back. By sheer merit and skill he has established himself as one of the finest jockeys ever seen in this country, his American methods— which were then more or less tabooed here—notwithstanding. In his case the crouching seat was not so pronounced as with most of his contemporaries, and certainly he is far more graceful in the saddle than the mighty little man Sloan, or any other American. He had not completed his nineteenth year y when, at the first opportunity in England, he rode a winner at Manchester, and there is no doubt he will always have pleasant memory of Mr. M'Creey's Paiute, who, trained by Blackwell, gave him such an auspicious send-off. During the two months of the season 1900 which remained he scored 26 times., and before the end of his second year in England had become something of a public idol on the Turf. Ninetyfour winners in 1901; 106 in 1902; 56 — he was standing down for several weeks owing to a nasty motor accident which nearly cost him his life — in 1903; 115 in 1904; 101 in 1905; 103 in 1906; 114 in 1907; 139 in 1908; 116 in 1909; 127 in 1910; 99^ — nothing but laziness kept him short of the century — in 1911 ; 109 in 1912; and 115 last year make up a splendid record, of which any man may be prond. Including 350 successes during his last three seasons in America, Maher has ridden 1771 winners within sixteen years, an average of 111 per annum." 'Mr. J. Loughlin, who has been appointed to the position of stipendiary steward to the V.R.C., vacated by Mr. Griffiths, is only thirty-four years of age. He graduated at the Sydney University. W. Higgs, who rode 148 winners in 1907, 124 in J9OB. and 101 in 1909, has retired from the Saddle. Last season he had 36 successes. M. Michel Ephrusi, a prominent French owner, died in Paris on sth January, at the age of seventy. At one time he had a few horses in training at Newmarket, and probably the best animal he ever owned was Finasseur, who won the French Derby, Grand Prix, and the Prix dv President de la Republique in 1905. 'American horsemen are still asking, When will the limit of trotting speed be reached? When Goldsmith Maid covered a mile in 2min 14sec in 1874 the trotting world was amazed, and when ten years later Jay Eye See traversed the same distance in 2min lOsec, it was thought the limit had very nearly been reached. Ten years later, however, Alix reduced I the mile to 2min 3fsec, and it was then thought that the two-minute mark, if ifc were ever reached, would without a doubt be the high-water limit. In 1903 Lou Dillon, with the aid of a windshield, t'f tted a mile in lmin 585860, and in the same year the gelding Major Delmar legitimately broke the two minutes by trotting a mile without the aid of an artificial wind-shield in lmin 59£ sec. Two years ago Uhlan reduced that record to lmin 58sec. Last year, I hitched to a sulky, with a galloper attached to an outrigger to take the weight I of the sulky, Uhlan did the mile in lmin 54sec, and covered half a mile in a sulky, without assistance, at a lmin 52sec gait. But, marvellous as these performances are, they were , totally I eclipsed last November by a, two-year-old trotting filly named Virginia Burnett, by the fashionable sire Moko, out of Zephyr, a mare with a 2min 7£sec record. Im probable as it may appear in Australia, where 2min 11 4-ssec is the fastest mile ever trotted by any aged horse, this trotting wonder^ but two years old, covered half a mile in lmin Ofsec. There «'.re dreamers in America who aTe asking, Will the trotting speed ever reach or excel the galloping speed? We may scoff, but thirty years ago the prospect of a trotter breaking the two minutes was regarded just as remote a possibility, and that has been beaten by bix seconds. —Witness. Since Moifaa was successful in the Liverpool Grand National Steeplechase ten years more than one colonial horse has been sent to England with designs on the big cross-country race, but few of them have even reached the length of going to the post. According to latest news from Australia, another invasion is in prospect, it having been I decided to send Bullawarra to England jto compete in the Grand National I Steeplechase and other important crosscountry races. Bullawarra, according to present arrangements, will leave at the conclusion of the Victorian winter jumping contests at the end of August or earty in September. He will thus arrive in England about six months before the big Liverpool cross-country race. J. N. M'Gregor, the crack cross-country horseman, who is wellknown in New Zealand, his successes including the Grand National Steeplechase on Slow Tom, will go to England to ride Bullawarra, but he will not leave Melbourne until the end of this year. Bullawarra, says " The Possible," is owned by Mr. Noman Falkiner, and has started in thirty-two races for twelve wins, four seconds, and two thirds. He has won over hurdles and across country, the Australian Steeplechase being credited to him last year under 12.11. At the Victoria Racing Club's meeting last November he won the Cup Hurdle Handicap, in which he carried 12.7 A few days later, in the November Hurdle Handicap, he finished second to Marton, to whom he' waa conceding two stone, and, as Marton was the crack hurdler of New Zealand a few months earlier, the form read particularly well. If Bullawarra only runs up to his Australian reputation, he will certainly create a favourable impression among English sportsmen. He is such a capable galloper on the flaii that he has only to become accustomed to the fences in England in order to take a very high place as a steeplechaser. The betting question is still being agitated in Germany, and the Bill for granting concessions or licenses to bookmakers is being actively discussed by the Special Committee deputed to report to the Parliament. Suggestions are being made- on every side, but according to Deutscher Sport a proposition exists which will, to a certain extent, hamper the dealings of those who are willing to lay the odds without having the license required. Tho law on betting and gambling will be altered, and the exception which enables men to invoke the Gambling Act as an excuse for non-payment of debts will not hold good in the case of the licensed bookmaker, who will be permitted to sue for and recover moneys owing to him or be sued for racing debts due by him. Only thoroughly responsible persons and men of real substance will be accepted, so that one great point will be secured. It seems strange that after the loyal essay made of the Totalisator on the other side of the Rhine the police are convinced that nothing can stop Turf speculation, and that any attempt to stop the giving and taking of odds j simply drives the best breeders and owners from a pursuit which is the keystone of a great national indgstry.

Changes are spoken of in the Austrian Jockey Club. Prince Alexander of Solms-Braunfels has intimated his intention of retiring. Prince Christian Kraffc Hohenlohe-Oehringen, who was President of the Union Club of Berlin from 1893 to 1910, but since which time hs has taken considerable interest in racing in Austro-Hungary, where he is a large landholder, has every chance of being elected. The ne\v betting regulations were to have come into force in Austria on ths first of the year. Several modifications were considered necessary at the last moment. The licensed bookmakers appealed against the heavy tax of two kronen (Is 8d) imposable on all wagers up to £12. They suggested a sliding scale for small investments, beginning with pence and gradually rising. The Hungarian Jockey Club have been informed by the authorities that they could not be permitted to establish offices for the purpose of betting according to the custom until now prevailing in Germany, so that all the club can do is to increase by three the number of the bookmakers holding concessions at the moment. Eleven years have passed since last a three-year-old colt carried off the Two Thousand, tho Derby, and the St. Leger, or, in other words, the "triple crown." In all only ten horses have succeeded in accomplishing the treble. West' Australian, in 1853) was the pioneer, followed in the 'sixties by Gladiateur and Lord Lyon. Twenty years then passed before Ormonde enrolled himself winner of the triple crown (1886), but in the 'nineties no fewer than four horses did the trick in Common, Isinglass, Galtee More, and Flying Fox, while in 1900 Diamond Jubilee and three years later Rock Sand made themselves famous in similar fashion. This year (writes "Vigilant"), rather curiously, several of the leading two-year-olds 'of last season are not engaged in all the three races. Imprimis, The Tetrarch, and Parhelion are only in the Two Thousand and Derby. Corcyra is in the Two Thousand and St. Leger, but not in the great Epsom classic. Then Aldford and Ambassador are only in the Derby and St. Leger, which applies also to Carancho and Dan Russel. Land of Song, again, is in < the same boat as Corcyra, being only in ihe first and last of the colts' classics, whereas the only classic open to Honeywood is the Derby. The most promising of the British-bred colts in all the three races include Black Jester, By George, Carrickfergus, Courageous (who split a pastern last summer), Evansdale, Flying Orb, Hapsburg, Kennymore, Kheri, Lancelot, Lanius, Laracor, Longtown, St. Cyr, St. Spasa, Sergoi, Soulouque,Stornoway, Ted Smith, and White Boy. Turning to the fillies, suffice it to remark that Torchlight, Lancaster Lady, and First Spear figure in the One Thousand Guineas, Oak 6, and Leger, while Glorvina and Mira are in the came races and also the Derby. The close of the past racing season on the flat was the signal for the retirement from the saddle of that remarkable young jockey Frank Wootton, and it is a coincidence that 1913 should have also seen the relinquishment of active work by one^ of the best of our cross-country professionals in F. Mason. "Tich" for several years held a leading position among the best cross-country horsemen of his day, and achieved the highest honour of his avocation when he steeied Kirkland to victory in the Grand National of 1905. After a remarkable im munitj from serious mishap he had a bad accident at Haydock Park in the March of 1911, and so roughly was he served that it was feared he woul3 be incapacitated from following his profession, and he then expressed a determination to relinquish riding horses and to train them instead. He made an extraordinary recovery, however, and towards the end of that year reappear**! in the saddle and rode in all his old form. The resolution he has now taken appears to be final, and cross-country sport loses >n him one of the best and most popular horsemen of recent years. As an indication of his ability, it may be recorded thafc he headed the annual list of winning jockeys' on seven occasions in eight years, his record being as follows :—: — 1900, 47 wins ; 1901, 58 ; 1902, 67 ; 1903, second with* 38 (P. Woodland being first with 54); 1904. 59; 1905, 74; 1906, 58, 1907, 59. In 1908 he was a good second, and filled the same position in 1910 and 191 L Should he determine to start us trainer, he will doubtless want nothing in the way of patronage, »nd do as w«ll as others who have taken up that line after a long experience of cross-country riding.— Sportsman. Mr. Tindal, the breeder of Yattendon, recently died in England, and in commenting on his death a Sydney exchange relates the following incident in connection with the foaling of Yattendon : — "Australia narrowly escaped losing one of its two greatest prizes in the thoroughbred horse lottery a few days after Yattendon was born. An employee noticed Cassandra in a great state of agitation and flurry, and having nothing better to do he investigated, and found her foal at the bottom of a deep hole, into which he had fallen, and had been there some time. It was late in the evening, and if Cassandra's excitement had not been noticed he would have died in the night. 4t is was, ho was only rescued jn the nick of time. From this on Yattendon never looked back and grew up into a magnificent horse, a rich' brown, with most perfect shoulders and barrel. His head inclined to be Roman, and many of his stock ' came with Israelitish 'ponums.' The Yattendons were, almost without exception, most wonderfully game horses. Old hands were in the habit of asserting : 'A Yattendon is never beaten until past the post.' Mr. W. A. Long, one of the oldest turfmen in Australia, looked upon Yattendon as really the best stallion this country has known, and he has often declared that had his best sons been used in the best studs the Vat- j tendons would have stood out high and dry in the sire line, as his daughters did on the female side. For a horse to have served 70 first-class performers — that is, winners of the best races — is something to boast of. This Yattendon succeeded in doing, and among about 100 successful brood mares he left in the Stud Book no less thac 30 — through themselves or their daughters — are on the records as producers of classic and first-class handicap winners, and the rest boie winners of minor races." In responding to the toast of his health at the- Adelaide Racing Club's luncheon a few days ago, the Governor of South Australia (Sir Day Boßanquet) said that he had seen much to excite hia admiration in the national resources of South Australia. "Here," he continued, "is to be found fin© manly sports and pastimes, which exercise an important influence upon the formation ot the national character. (Cheers.) Of these sports racing is one of the most interesting, and I am sure that, when property carried out, sport is productive of beneficial results. (Cheers.) It undoubtedly improved the breed of a valuable description of stock, for which the climate of South Australia is particularly suitable. (Cheers.) For my part, I hold that a taste for manly, national, out-of-door amusement is essential" to the formation of a sound, healthy, vigorous national character. (Cheers.) I think it is a mistake to discourage such pleasures because they may possibly lead to abuses and excesses. People must have recreation and amusement, and it is better to join and sympathise with them genially and heartily, and do what you can to pakg Ahem go o£ with pipderaiiiog and 1

propriety, than to spend one's time preaching against them as disreputable and demoralising." (Cheers.) According to El Jockey (Buenos Aires) of the 10th inst., Cyllene heads the list of winning stallions in South America (from Ist January to Bth December), with 26 winners of 52 races, worth 435,763 dollars. Second is Old Man, with 31 winners of 67 races, worth 427,673 dollars, and Jardy third with 33 winners of 63 races, of the value of 412,040 dollars. Diamond Jubilee comes fourth, with 22 winners of 51 races, worth 317,177 dollars, Orange fifth, with 23 winners of 196,800 dollars, Val dOr sixth (185,452 dollars), and Polar Star seventh (177,347 dollars). Thus the United Kingdom is responsible for the first, fourth, and seventh, and France for the third and sixth, while Old Man and Orange (the second and fourth) were bred out there, both by imported Orbit (winner of the Eclipse Stakes). Since being in England Carbine, who nas now retired from active service at • the stud, put uj> the following record :— ■ No. of No. of Value.

The best horse he ever sired was, of course, Spearmint and in Australia Wallace, each of whom is now ably maintaining the Musket line.

SOUTH AUCKLAND RACES (bt telegraph.— press association.) HAMILTON, 20th February. The first day of the South Auckland Meeting opened to-day in fine weather, and on'a fast course. There was a record attendance. Results : — Trial Handicap. — Glenspire, 1 ; Opposition, 2 ; Zalupin, 3. Scratched : Soldier and Firefly. Won by a length and a-half. Time, lmin 31sec. Claudelands Handicap.— Positive, 1 ; Arawa, 2 ; SaMa, 3. Scratched : Bogey, Lady Thorn, Harenoa, Obdurate, and Revelation. Won by a length. Time, lmin 2 2-ssec. Cup.— Goldsize, 1 : Almeida, 2 ; Gloy, 3. Scratched : Royal Irish. Won by a length. Time, 2min. Maiden Hurdles. — Cloudy Dawn, 1 ; Vestal, 2 ; Santiago, 3. Scratched : Spectre, Hammerless, Hawea, and Royal Patron. Won easily. Time, 2min 54sec. Pioneer Handicap.— Kitty Bellairs, 1 ; Laird o' Gowrie, 2 ; Attraction, 3. All started. Won by half a head. Time, 49 4-ssec. Publicans' Handicap.— Spalfish, 1 ; Tattoo, 2; Sa.lute, 3. All started. Won by half a length. Time, lmin 14 2-ssec. District Hack Handicap.— Spalperion, 1 ; Revelation, 2 ; Zalupin, 3. Scratched : Firefly. Won by half a length. Time, lmin 16sec. Flying Handicap — Tripoli, 1; Hinerewa, 2; Manurere, 3. Scratched: Bogey and Chasm. Won by half a length. WANGANUI ACCEPTANCES (IT TEtiEGIMPB.— PRESS ASSOCIATION.) ' WANGANUI, 20th February. In connection with the Wanganui Jockey Club's Autumn Meeting, acceptances for the first day's events are as follow : — ' Stewards' Handicap; eight furlongs and a-half.— Emperador 9.6, Expect 8.12, Patronale 8.1, Allegation 8.1, Passadena 8.1, Red Book 7.10, Merry Frank 7.9, Stepney 7.7, Coromandel 6.9, Guiding Way 6.9. Petre Hack Handicap ; six furlongs, — Vocation 8.15, Aratiatia 8.10, Avaunce 8.8, Historiette 7.13, Sweet Zinnia 7.13, Firing Line 7.8, Princess Moutoa 7.7, Belasco 7.7, Brunswick 7.4, Armature 7.1, While Plume 7.0, Sylvania 7.0, Grandston 7.0, His Eminence 7.0. Westmere Hurdles ; two miles — Bercola 11.2, Merrie Lad 10.9, The Rover 10.9, Kurnalpi 10.3, Timothy 9.12, Cornelian 9.7, Whimper 9.0. Tayforth Hurdles ; one mile and threequarters. — Waipaku 11.6 (including 101b penalty), Taurangi 10.2, Composed 10.2 (including 101b penalty), Aruake 9.6, St. Gate 9.0, Ruffy 9.0. Juvenile Handicap ; five furlongs. — Rencontre 8.9, Carloman 7,7, Bradan:ante 7.7, Shannon Bells 7*.5, Dame Rumour 7.2, Protocol 7.2, Grey Guard 7.2, Marcelifle 7.2. Wanganui Cup ; one mile and threequarters. — Bon Ton 9.0, Sinapis 8.10, Sir Solo 8.9, .Bronze 8.6, Los Angelos 8.2/ Sea Pink 8.2, Lord Renown 7.11, Cheddar 7.11, Sir Knox 7.9, Byron 7.9, Tiresome 7.7, Leonta 7.3, Marshal M'Donald 7.0, Moutoa Girl 6.13, Manawakaha 6.10. Wiritoa Hack Handicap ; eight furlongs and a-half.— Canute 9.0, White Crane 8.1, Square Deal 8.0, Lubriline 7.13 (including 101b penalty), Kimbombi 7.9, Record 7.6, Moirette 7.4, Sweet Van 7.2, Centenary 7.1. Flying Handicap; six furlongs. — Bon Reve 8.11, Gipsy Belle 8.8, Ermengarde 8.8, Culprit 8.5, Gladiole 8.3, Makara 7.13, Lady Volga 7.10, Grattan 7.4, Heather 7.3, Pavlova 7.3, Epworth 7.0, Sauci 7.0 (including 71b penalty), Avaunce 6.12, Gerberga 6.10, Sunbird 6.10. NAPIER CUP ENTRIES (t,r lELEGRIi>n PKBSS >SSOCIiTION.) NAPIER, 20th February. The following are the entries for the Napier Cup, of 500 soys ; one mile and a quarter. — Merriwa, Birkful, Ladoga, Los Angelos, Birkline, Sea Pink, Red Book, Mysteriarch, Settler, Tatimi, Perceler, Marshal M'Donald, Vi, Sea ton Dale, Mistie, Kooya, Bronze, Bertrada, Fair Rosamond, Byron, Passadena, Immer, Haskayne, Merrie Jack, Evadne, Lord Renown ; Moutoa Girl, Mangaroa, Eocene, Multiply, Suratura.

fear. .899 .900 .901 .902 .903 .904 .905 .906 .907 .908 .909 .910 [911 .912 .913 Winners. .., 2 ... 12 ... 11 ... 16 ... 12 ... 10 ... 12 ... 13 '... 9 ... 13 .... 8 ... 8 ... 5 ... 4 ... 3 . Eaces. £ 2 75 19 4,5S 23 8,04! 41 22,121 20 5,1H 16 4,441 20 5;40: 22 16,04! 21 4,06( 22 8,39 i 17 10,25< 9 2,24< 9 1,471 6 2,05' 6 1,05< 138 : 253 £96,03!

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THE TURF, Evening Post, Volume LXXXVII, Issue 44, 21 February 1914

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THE TURF Evening Post, Volume LXXXVII, Issue 44, 21 February 1914

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